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Last updateTue, 18 Sep 2018 1pm

The Regrettes have in youth achieved what most musicians spend their entire lives trying to achieve.

The band, which has more than 250,000 monthly listeners on Spotify, earlier this year completed a European stadium tour. Debut album Feel Your Feelings Fool! achieved critical acclaim in 2017, and follow-up How Do You Love? is scheduled for an Aug. 9 release.

The four young adults in the Los Angeles-based punk/alternative-rock band are creating the soundtrack for the lives of teenagers everywhere—and the band will be kicking off its latest U.S. tour on Friday, July 19, at all-ages Pappy and Harriet’s Pioneertown Palace.

Frontwoman Lydia Night talked about opening for Twenty One Pilots during a European tour earlier this year.

“That was an insane experience, something that I never would predict to happen so soon, or just at all,” Night said. “Playing in front of that many people is something that you can’t really prepare for. (Opening for) a band that size, you just don’t know what’s coming at all. You just have to hop in with both feet and hope for the best, just go for it, and learn from experience with each show. … To see all of that was so exciting and inspiring.”

The Regrettes did not have a lot of time to prepare.

“The craziest thing about that tour was that we found out we were going on it six days before it started, so that was pretty fucking nuts,” Night said.

The band is starting off its tour in Pioneertown, in part because Night has a lot of personal experience at Pappy and Harriet’s.

“Pappy’s is somewhere I actually started doing open mics at, when I was 9 or 10, really young,” she said. “My dad owns a hotel out there, and Joshua Tree has been a big part of my life as a musician. I remember walking around with a tip jar at Pappy’s after doing open mics and shows on the indoor stage. Playing on the outdoor stage has always been a goal and dream of mine, so the fact that we’re playing there is so special to me and really exciting.”

Night is 18 years old; I’m a 17-year-old musician (I also got my start at Pappy and Harriet’s, coincidentally), so I was curious to hear her thoughts on the treatment of younger bands at 21-and-older shows.

“Yeah, it’s so frustrating,” she said. “It hasn’t happened in so long, since we’ve gotten bigger, but in my old band, which was a two-piece, there were a lot of shows we’d play that weren’t all-ages, and they’d be weird about us even being in the venue before playing, which just made no sense to me. We’d have to wait outside or go kill time before the show and be escorted to the stage, always with X’s on our hand.”

One of The Regrettes’ standout tracks, “Seashore,” mentions getting looked down upon because of a young age: “You’re talkin’ to me like I’m dumb / Well I’ve got news; I’ve got a lot to say / There’s nothing you can do to take that away.” Night said she’s learned how to deal with people treating her differently due to her age.

“It used to be something that was just talked about in press or media. People sometimes do, but not nearly as much now,” she said. “It’s more of other bands approaching us or people at venues approaching us. It hasn’t been in-your-face disrespectful, but there’s an underlying tone, because there are three women who are all pretty young. Sometimes people approach us like they’re more knowledgeable about our gear, or about the way a show is run, and we’re like, ‘Actually, we’ve been touring for a very long time. Thank you very much, but we know how to work our amps.’ But honestly, it doesn’t happen too often, and we’re pretty good at avoiding it and standing up for ourselves.”

Many Regrettes songs cover the emotions and insecurities teenagers face; Night said she hopes the songs serve as consolation.

“I just speak on things I know about and am experiencing,” she said. “… I’m just a very honest songwriter, and stuff that’s being talked about in our music is from a truthful place. I think it’s important as an artist to take a stand like that when writing music. … I like doing that, because it lets others know that it’s OK to be confident in those feelings and emotions, whatever they’re going through.”

The band’s three newest singles—“I Dare You,” “Pumpkin” and “Dress Up”—offer more of an alternative-rock feel, in contrast to the punk-heavy songs on Feel Your Feelings Fool! Night said to expect more of this on How Do You Love?

“It’s more of a mix of Blondie/’80s pop meets early Strokes meets Regrettes,” she said.

The Regrettes will perform with Hot Flash Heat Wave at 9 p.m., Friday July 19, at Pappy and Harriet’s Pioneertown Palace, 53688 Pioneertown Road, in Pioneertown. Tickets are $15. For tickets or more information, call 760-365-5956, or visit pappyandharriets.com.

Published in Previews

I bumped into Robyn Celia, the co-owner of Pappy and Harriet’s, in the coffee aisle at the grocery store—and she reminded me to make sure I got to The Breeders show early to catch The Regrettes, the opening band.

I take Celia’s recommendations seriously, since she and Linda Krantz have created one of the best music venues in America.

Lydia Night, the lead singer of The Regrettes, greeted the early crowd: “Hi, Pappy’s! How are you doing? Get closer; we are not going to bite.”

“Come Through” was a blast as Lydia danced and strutted on the stage like a veteran. The Regrettes sang about teenage insecurities in “A Living Human Girl”: “I’ve got pimples on my face and grease in my hair, and prickly legs; go ahead and stare.” Night was full of confidence and talent beyond her years. The Regrettes just became one of my new favorite bands.

The Breeders kicked off their only announced California stop on their U.S. tour in support of their first new record in 10 years, All Nerve, featuring the lineup from 25 years ago: Kim Deal and her twin Kelley Deal, with Jim MacPherson and Josephine Wiggs.

The band walked onstage, and Kim Deal announced: “We are The Breeders, and it looks like we landed on a different planet. Are you ready?”

I must admit that I have a little crush on Kim Deal, who, in my humble opinion, has the best vocals on the most popular Pixies songs. But as a fan boy, I only had one wish—to hear a rendition of a song played in Lollapalooza in 1994. The cynic in me doubted that I would hear this song, since they’d likely be pushing the new material; this is show business, after all. But as I heard, “I like all the different people, I like sticky everywhere, look around, you bet I’ll be there!” I could not stop smiling: The band actually started the set with that song, “Saints.”

The perfect rendition of the song made it apparent that the extensive sound-check earlier in the day paid off, as Kim Deal’s voice was spot-on.

At that point, I thought the Breeders wouldn’t top that. But the band did.

After “Divine Hammer,” a song that illustrated the sweetness of Kim Deal’s voice, she told the crowd the band was going to play some new songs, and introduced “All Nerve,” a slow-tempo song with remarkable reverb, which invoked tenderness: “I hit the hull. Oh God, I hit them all. You don’t know how far I’d go.”

With a chrome whistle in Kim Deal’s hand, the crowd went crazy as the band played “Cannonball.” Feeding off the audience, the Breeders appeared to be having a blast.

As Kim Deal introduced one of my favorite songs off the new album, “Skinhead No. 2”—co-written by Wiggs—she did not holding back with the opening verse: “I need spit to crush these beetles on my lips.”

The song “Dawn,” also off the new record, was pure ecstasy. The gangly song “Nervous Mary” received great fan reaction. A video of the song filmed in the Netherlands, released earlier in the year, stars Kim and Kelley Deal as adorable puppets.

Changing things up, Kim said, “My mom says Kelley needs to sing a song,” and introduced Kelley on lead vocals for “I Just Wanna Get Along.”

Kim Deal said: “Thank you very much for coming out. Good luck getting home. There is no cell service at Pappy and Harriet’s.” The band then closed with a cover of “Gigantic,” by the Pixies. It was bittersweet but lovely, seeing as Kim stood on the same spot as the Pixies did during a surprise April 2014 show, sans Kim.

Coming back for a short encore, the Breeders ended with “Huffer,” another classic from an incredible band.

Published in Reviews