CVIndependent

Wed02262020

Last updateTue, 18 Sep 2018 1pm

Cannabis in the CV

18 Dec 2018
by  - 
As we approach the one-year anniversary of legal cannabis in California, the Coachella Valley has gone through many changes—specifically on the employment front. As this new industry has evolved, so have the career prospects in the region, with many cannabis employers in the Coachella Valley ramping up to hire in large numbers in 2019. Understandably, many potential employees have questions about careers in the cannabis industry—and there are a few things any prospective employee should know before jumping in. The job opportunities are numerous and continuing to grow along with the industry, ranging from entry-level jobs, such as budtenders and trimmers, to high-level growers and professional roles, such as human-resource work and executive leadership. While the high-end jobs can pay up to six figures, it is taking some time for the industry to catch up in terms of pay and benefits, although things are beginning to level out. Remember that…
20 Nov 2018
by  - 
After California’s legalization of cannabis in January 2018, many people in the Coachella Valley noticed the start of a “Green Rush” of business—and have questions about how it will affect the economics in the valley. Since this is a new industry in the state, that question can be answered, at least in part, by examining the outcomes in states that already have a history of legalized cannabis, such as Colorado. There is a great deal of data that can be gathered from that state showing the Coachella Valley may be on its way to—pardon the pun—much greener pastures. In March, The Denver Post reported the results of a landmark study done by Colorado State University-Pueblo in Pueblo County, which found that legalized marijuana had an unprecedented impact on the economy. It found that the cannabis industry contributed $58 million to the local economy of Pueblo County alone in 2016. Once…
16 Oct 2018
by  - 
A new law directing the California Veterinary Medical Board to create guidelines for veterinarians to discuss pets’ use of cannabis was signed by Gov. Jerry Brown in September, and will go into effect on Jan. 1. Assembly Bill 2215 is surprisingly controversial—for several different reasons. On one hand, it’s a leap forward—as of now, the veterinary board can revoke the license of a veterinarian if he or she even discusses cannabis use for pets. On the other hand, the law still prohibits vets from prescribing cannabis products for their patients. Again, the longstanding prohibition mentality is standing in the way of real progress. Lawmakers, veterinarians, the veterinary board and pet owners are justifiably concerned, because almost no research has been done regarding the safe and effective uses and dosages of cannabis for pets. Given humans’ longstanding use of cannabis, it is not surprising that we have also been using it…
18 Sep 2018
by  - 
Pesticides are a problem. In August, the Environmental Working Group—a nonprofit “dedicated to protecting human health and the environment”—announced the results of a study it commissioned to test foods made with oats. The group found glyphosate, an herbicide linked to cancer, in nearly all of them. Pesticides are a problem when it comes to marijuana, too. It’s complicated: Pesticides and herbicides are regulated by the federal government. However, the federal government continues to enforce cannabis prohibition. Therefore, there are currently no pesticides and herbicides approved for use on cannabis plants. To make things even more complicated, marijuana can be used in so many different ways—smoked, eaten, vaporized, as a salve, etc.—and there is no consensus among scientists regarding safe levels of pesticides with cannabis. A chemical might be safe to consume on food—but highly toxic when exposed to the high heat of smoking or vaping. For example, Eagle 20EW, a…
22 Aug 2018
by  - 
Finding work in the Coachella Valley is not an easy task—unless you’re looking for a low-paying job without much opportunity for advancement. Even people with a lot of skills and great work histories have trouble finding satisfying work. I have heard of people with doctorates in Spanish taking jobs as housekeepers just to pay the bills. I came out of the service industry, and taught in the culinary program at a community college for 13 years; I mistakenly assumed my skills would be in high demand when I came to the desert. Instead, I have had to hustle to find meaningful employment. This is why the jobs the newish and thriving cannabis industry is bringing to the Coachella Valley are needed and welcome. On Indeed.com alone, at last check, there were 11 local marijuana-industry positions paying $50,000 a year or more listed. It’s estimated that there are approximately 123,000 full-time…