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12 Aug 2020

Kamala's California Roots; a Nose Spray That Could Prevent COVID—Coachella Valley Independent Daily Digest: Aug. 12, 2020

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Let’s jump right into today’s news, because there sure is a lot of it:

Our partners at CalMatters look at Sen. Kamala Harris—soon to be the Democratic vice-presidential nominee, as you may have heard—and her distinctively Californian roots. Key quote: “Born and bused to school in Berkeley, tested by San Francisco’s cut-throat municipal politics and propelled onto the national stage as the state’s top law enforcement officer and then its first female senator of color, Harris’ approach to politics and policymaking were honed here.”

• MedPage Today explains the hopes doctors have for something called a vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) called RLF-100 as a coronavirus treatment. The VIP was first developed 50 years ago—and this could be its shining moment.

• More encouraging news, this time out of USCF: Scientists there are touting the results of a study of a nasal spray that apparently blocks SARS-CoV-2. Once manufactured, it could be sold in stores—and offer serious protection from the virus.

Is it possible previous immunizations are protecting some people from COVID-19? While that figurative jury remains out, it’s indeed possible, according to researchers interviewed by CNN.

We’ll just leave this MedPage Today study headline and subheadline right here: ‘Widespread COVID-19 Outbreak at Georgia Camp Raises Concerns About Reopening Schools; 76% SARS-CoV-2 positivity rate suggests kids are ‘efficient transmitters.’

• According to the Los Angeles Times, proper state stockpiles of masks and other personal protective equipment could have saved at least 15,800 essential workers from getting COVID-19and could have saved the state hundreds of millions of dollars in unemployment claims, per a study by the UC Berkeley Labor Center.

An epidemiologist, writing for The Conversation, got sick with COVID-19 back in March, and is still dealing with symptoms more than four months later. She discusses the research being done on people like her—who call themselves “long-haulers.”

COVID-19 case rates have been steadily declining in the U.S. for the past two weeks. Unfortunately, so has the volume of testing—meaning we don’t know for sure whether progress is actually being made. Sigh.

The Washington Post reports on a Duke University study on the effectiveness of masks. Key takeaways: The more layers, the better—and neck gaiters may actually make matters worse.

Russia became the first country to register a COVID-19 vaccine—even though scientists are skeptical, because the vaccine has not gone through all the proper clinical trials and tests. CNBC explains the Russians’ justification for the early registry: They were working on the vaccine long before this particular coronavirus came along.

• Sort-of related: The feds have announced yet another deal for 100 million vaccine doses, from yet another manufacturer, for yet more billions of dollars.

• Horrifically, the outbreak at San Quentin State Prison has become a real-time test of the achievability of herd immunityand, as the Los Angeles Times points out, so far, the results are not good.

• During normal economic downturns, people tend to spend less on their pets. However, the exact opposite has happened this year: Veterinarians’ business is booming, according to The New York Times. https://www.nytimes.com/2020/08/10/upshot/pets-health-boom-coronavirus.html

• Even though there is a residential eviction moratorium in the state, people are still being evicted from their homes—including many here in Riverside County. From our partners at CalMatters, via the Independent: “More than 1,600 California households … have been evicted since Newsom declared a statewide state of emergency on March 4, according to data CalMatters obtained via public record requests from more than 40 California sheriffs’ departments. Nearly a third of those evictions took place after Newsom’s March 19 shelter-in-place order, and more than 400 since Newsom issued a self-described March 27 “eviction moratorium.” 

• Medical experts are justifiably worried about the potential double-whammy of influenza and COVID-19 during the upcoming flu season. However, SFGate points out that the flu season has been mercifully light in the Southern Hemisphere, thanks to mask usage and more people getting flu shots.

What are the odds of contracting COVID-19 on an airplane flight? According to a preliminary study by a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, they’re pretty darned low.

• The New York Times reports that “bars and restaurants have become a focal point for clusters of COVID infections.” Fortunately, the story is mostly talking about indoor dining—not outdoor, as is allowed here. Key quote: “’As of recently, we still hadn’t traced a major U.S. outbreak of any sort to an outdoor exposure,’ Lindsey Leininger, a health policy researcher and a clinical professor at the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth, said.

The Wall Street Journal examines the supply-chain shortages that continue to keep supermarket shelves emptier than normal.

• Meanwhile, in Florida, a sheriff has prohibited his deputies and visitors to his department from wearing masks. Correct, he will not ALLOW people to wear masks. It would be irresponsible for me to engage in speculation regarding what inadequacies Marion County Sheriff Billy Woods’ may be overcompensating for here to make such an overwrought move.

After losing a critical court case over whether its drivers should be classified as employees or independent contractors, Uber’s CEO said today that the company may need to temporarily suspend operations in California.

• The New York Times examines the current state-by-state status of voting by mail. The good news: people in 42 states, representing 76 percent of voters, can vote by mail without an excuse. The bad … well, there’s that other 24 percent.

• Every summer, the Rancho Mirage Chamber of Commerce holds its Taste of Summer Rancho Mirage fundraiser. It works like this: You buy a wristband for $10 from a charity that gets to keep that $10; that wristband gets you deals at participating Rancho Mirage restaurants. This year’s fundraiser was delayed a bit because of, well, you know, but the revamped “Take Out” Taste of Summer starts Aug. 17. Get the details here.

At more than 20 links, that’s enough news for the day. Wash your hands. Wear a mask. Be kind. If you’re able, please consider throwing a few bucks our way to the Independent can keep doing what we do, and making it free to everyone. The Daily Digest will return Friday.

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