CVIndependent

Tue10202020

Last updateMon, 24 Aug 2020 12pm

Today was one of the biggest COVID-19-related news days in quite a while, so let’s get right to the links:

Reopening processes around the country—and in some parts of California—are coming to a halt or being reversed, due to increasing COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations. In Texas and Florida, bars are being closed, and other business are being restricted.

San Francisco was planning on allowing hair salons, outdoor bars and other businesses to open on Monday. That move has been delayed indefinitely.

• And most worrisome locally: For the first time since the reopening process began, the state has told a county that it needs to re-impose a strict stay-at-home order—Imperial County, our neighbors to the southeast. And another neighboring county, San Bernardino, is close to running out of non-surge hospital beds

Riverside County is behind the curve at hiring contact tracers. The good news is that as of yesterday, the county was up to 220 of them, with 180 added in the last five weeks, according to the Riverside Press-Enterprise. However, the state says we need around 375 of them.

• Dr. Anthony Fauci said the federal government is considering a new way of testing for SARS-CoV-2—pool testing. “The approach works this way: Samples from, say, 20 people are combined into a single pool,” reports The Washington Post. “One coronavirus test is used on the entire pool. If the test comes back negative, researchers know they can move on to another pool of samples. If it comes back positive, only then would each individual be tested.

A Tucson emergency room doctor penned a column for The New York Times with this headline: “I’m a Health Care Worker. You Need to Know How Close We Are to Breaking.”

• While the state-by-state numbers here are probably too small to take too seriously … a recent Axios/Ipsos poll shows that 64 percent of Californians wear masks whenever they go outthe second highest percentage behind New York.

• A JPMorgan study shows a correlation between restaurant spending and the spread of the coronavirus, according to CNBC—and, conversely, “higher spending at supermarkets predicts a slower spread of the virus.” However, experts point out that this doesn’t necessarily mean restaurants are to blame for the spread.

• Also according to CNBC: The number of homeowners delaying their monthly mortgage payments is on the rise again, after falling for several weeks.

Can you shop safely in a brick-and-mortar clothing store? Esquire talked to some experts to get answers. Key quote from Erin Bromage, associate professor of biology and immunology at the University of Massachusetts: “It comes down to how long you spend in the store and how many people are in the store. If you are only in there for a short period of time, and they’re restricting occupancy, then the risk is low.”

From our partners at CalMatters, via the Independent: University of California campuses are telling students to prepare for a fall semester that will mostly—but not entirely—take place online.

• We’re now moving to our WTF?! portion of the digest, starting with the news that American Airlines is going to stop keeping middle seats open, and resume booking flights to capacity.

• It’s not often that I’ve wanted to tip my hat to Dick Cheney, but here we are: He says that real men wear face masks.

• Did you know North Carolina has an anti-mask law? It’s true—and it’s caused no small degree of confusion. It turns out the law is a decades-old measure meant to crack down on the KKK—but thankfully, it’s been temporarily suspended, at least through Aug. 1.

• Finally, this story is particularly devastating news to those of us here at Independent World Headquarters: Costco has stopped making half-sheet cakes. DAMN YOU ’RONA! DAMN YOU!!!

• No … we take back that “finally”; we can’t end the week on that awful note. So here’s some good news: San Francisco’s Transgender District was “the first legally recognized district in the world dedicated to a historically transgender community.” The economic downturn almost forced the nonprofit to close—but then came the Black Lives Matter protests. Now, the Transgender District is on firmer footing, as “the two movements have converged in a kind of intersectional synchronicity that is bringing renewed attention to the realities of transgender people of color,” reports the San Francisco Chronicle.

Readers, these are scary times. Please, take care of yourself this weekend. Wear a mask when you go out. Check in on neighbors and loved ones. Live in the now and enjoy life, because these days still count against the total number you have on this planet. Right? Oh, and help out the Independent, if you’re able, by becoming a Supporter of the Independent. The Daily Digest will return Monday.

Published in Daily Digest

Holy hell, does Sacha Baron Cohen have balls.

His latest TV show, Who Is America?—in which he disguises himself in heavy makeup and tricks people (including well known politicians) into sitting for interviews—is jaw-droppingly funny.

In the first episode on Showtime, he disguises himself as a right-wing activist on a scooter, even though he has no handicap. (“This here scooter is to preserve my body’s finite energy!”) He tries to persuade a very patient and confused Bernie Sanders into believing the 99 percenters can be moved into the top 1 percent, so we will all be 1 percenters. Bernie was not amused.

Other Cohen victims include a Trump delegate who suffers from white privilege (Cohen disguises himself as a left-wing, sensitive ponytail guy) and an art-gallery owner. (Cohen disguises himself as an ex con who makes art with his own feces and ejaculate.) It’s amazing to see just how tolerant some people can be.

The capper is a sequence in which Cohen, disguised as an activist who looks an awful lot like Freddie Mercury, gets a bunch of politicians (including Trent Lott) to read a public-service announcement favoring guns in the hands of 4-year-old children.

It’s vintage Cohen. Upcoming episodes will feature a now publicly angry Sarah Palin, Roy Moore and Dick Cheney, who actually did a show promo for Cohen. Cohen’s movies took a sharp turn into shitsville, so it’s good to see him being a dangerous interviewer again.

Published in DVDs/Home Viewing

On this week's evil-targeting Independent comics page: The K Chronicles bemoans the absence of a cigarette butt as a target; This Modern World honors the Cheney family; Jen Sorenson looks at college as a business; and Red Meat deals with yet another creature trapped in the basement.

Published in Comics

On this week's elegant Independent comics page: Red Meat prepares for a lovely meal at a seafood restaurant; The City catches up on the news out of Arizona; Jen Sorenson (who was just named the winner of the 2014 Herblock Prize for editorial cartooning!) ponders the freedoms of customers versus the freedoms of business owners; and The K Chronicles heads outdoors to go to a hockey-game spectacle.

Published in Comics

On this week's historic yet fragrant Independent comics page: The City tackles news items including Dick Cheney's daughter and the return of the Twinkie; Red Meat stews in its own juices; The K Chronicles urges you to go see a documentary, A Band Called Death; and Jen Sorenson puts ignorant tweets in historical context.

Published in Comics