CVIndependent

Sat03282020

Last updateMon, 23 Mar 2020 12pm

I have always been awful at living in the moment.

My mind, left unchecked, is always running—usually pondering something out of my control, or a hypothetical, or something in the future (i.e., a hypothetical).

What is this disaster going to do to my business? Will I be able to pay my bills? This was supposed to be opening week of baseball season; what if there’s no season at all this year? I am worried about my friend who’s coming down with something. I’ll need to go to the store tomorrow, and I don’t want to.

You get the idea.

Earlier today, I took a break and took a walk around the block with a friend who lives in my apartment complex. (Social distancing precautions were taken.) It was nice to be outside, and my friend and I had a good talk … but I couldn’t tell you five details on things I noticed on the walk. It was a gorgeous day, yet my mind was babbling to itself with worry, with fear, with what-ifs? and so on.

Wasted opportunity.

Truth be told, my stomach is feeling tight with anxiety as I type this. But if I take a deep breath, and focus on the moment, the now … everything’s OK.

It doesn’t feel OK, but it really is OK. I am home. I am safe. I am well-fed—and in fact, I am sipping a delicious michelada. I am working on something with purpose while listening to comfort music (i.e. the’80s station on SiriusXM). I am comfortable. The rest of my day is slated to consist of work I enjoy, a delicious dinner (homemade soup, salad and then homemade meatloaf) with the husband and cat, and then all sorts of Bon Appetit YouTube videos.

In the moment, in the now, life is good.

Just going through the exercise of typing this and thinking about its truthfulness has that anxiety knot in my stomach loosening … even if just a little. (Like I said, I have always been bad at this.)

For most of us, for most of the time, for most of this shelter-at-home phase, we will be OK in the now/moment. Yeah, we all need to prepare and plan and work to do our all to make sure our future selves—and our future friends, family, community, etc.—are taken care of. Yes, each of us will have bad moments. But we will all be better off if we are able to actually, for example, enjoy the gorgeousness of our spring weather during a walk around the block.

In the moment, in the now, life is good.

Here’s today’s news.

• Courtesy of our friends at Dig Boston, here’s another recap of COVID-19 coverage from alternative newspapers across the country.

The National Guard is here to help FIND Food Bank make sure the valley’s hungry are getting fed

• Palm Springs Mayor Geoff Kors reminds you that in California, sheltering-in-place is a requirement, not a recommendation.

• The California DMV is extending deadlines and launching virtual field offices. Watch for updates.

• If you’re looking for statewide news on the coronavirus and its effects, one of the best sources is our partner CalMatters. We’ll be republishing a lot of CalMatters’ coverage at CVIndependent.com, as we always do, but there’s always good stuff there.

• Casey Dolan, over at aggregation website Cactus Hugs, has also been doing a daily recap of COVID-19 news and links; here are his for today.

• Audible has launched a new free service with audiobooks for kids and teens during the duration of this COVID-19 mess.

• The city of Indio reminds you that city parks are open, but the playgrounds are closed.

• Jewish Family Service of the Desert—which is actually non-denominational, by the way—is offering telecare therapy for both existing clients and new, as well as other services. Details here.

• Bill Plaschke of the Los Angeles Times checked in with the legendary Vin Scully during these troubled times. Read the story, and listen to the video to hear words of hope from the legend himself.

• Finally, whether you’re a fan of the TV show Schitt’s Creek or not … some excellent advice above.

Keep washing your hands. Stay at home if you can. Call or message a loved one and say hey. More tomorrow.

Published in Daily Digest

FIND Food Bank Celebrates 35 Years of Feeding Coachella Valley Residents in Need

The statistics are staggering: Each month, FIND Food Bank—which supports the communities of the Coachella Valley, high desert and Salton Sea area—helps more than 85,000 people, both directly and through its partner agencies. In a year’s time, more than 10 million pounds of food will be given to those in need—more than half of that fresh fruit and vegetables.

The cynical among us right now might be thinking: “That’s great. But this is a restaurant-news column. What does this have to do with restaurant news?”

My retort: Those of us fortunate enough to eat at restaurants on occasion need to realize that a whole bunch of our neighbors need our help to get food on the table, period.

To that end, FIND is celebrating its 35 years of existence during September—which is also Hunger Action Month at FIND and all Feeding America-affiliated food banks—with an ambitious goal: FIND’s management is hoping 3,500 people will donate $35 to mark the Indio-based food bank’s 35 years of service.

Debbie Espinosa, FIND’s president and CEO, said she, her staff and volunteers are proud of what they’ve accomplished over 35 years.

“The accomplishment is amazing,” she said, “from starting with basic food rescue out of a blue Pinto, and turning it into a food bank that serves the Coachella Valley and beyond.”

Help out, if you can, with that $35 or more. Get details at www.findfoodbank.org.


In Brief

Gyoro Gyoro Izakaya Japonaise, the sprawling restaurant located 105 S. Palm Canyon Drive, in downtown Palm Springs, has closed for good. File this one under “wasted opportunity”: The restaurant, owned by now-in-bankruptcy Ramla USA Inc., could not take advantage of a relative dearth of Japanese restaurants in the west valley. While Gyoro Gyoro was a gorgeous restaurant with at-times great food, it seemed mismanaged, including a notorious closure following a bad health inspection, and a lack of community involvement. However, the news is not all bad: The family that owns L’Olivo Italian Restaurant, located at 333 N. Palm Canyon Drive, has already snapped up the location. Watch this space to see how that turns out. … Toucans Tiki Lounge, the popular gay bar located at 2100 N. Palm Canyon Drive, in Palm Springs, has been purchased by managers who are part of Foundation 10 Creative, the company that owns restaurants including Birba, Cheeky’s and Mr. Lyons Steakhouse. Dave Morgan, of Reaction Marketing and Promotions, is also involved. The new owners are saying Toucans will remain a gay bar focused on entertainment. Let’s see how this goes. ... Newish to Rancho Mirage, at 42452 Bob Hope Drive: Hielo Sno, a shaved-ice/snow-cone joint. Learn more at hielosno.business.site. … Donald “Lucky” Callender has purchased Babe’s BBQ and Brewhouse, located in Rancho Mirage’s The River at 71800 Highway 111, from the trust fund set up by his father, Donald W. Callender, the man who started both Babe’s and the Marie Callender’s chain. We hear changes are already taking place. … Celebrate Mexican Independence Day, if you’re so inclined, on Sunday, Sept. 16, with $16 tequila flights and live music at Las Casuelas Terraza, located at 222 S. Palm Canyon Drive, in downtown Palm Springs. Watch www.lascasuelas.com for more details. … On Saturday, Sept. 15, The Saguaro, at 1800 E. Palm Canyon Drive, in Palm Springs, will hold its Beats and Brews Fest. For $45, sample beers and tequilas from well more than two dozen companies, and enjoy great music from bands including The Flusters, Spankshaft and Plastic Ruby. Get more details at thesaguaro.com/palm-springs. … Coming soon to Palm Desert: The Vine Wine Bar, at 74868 Country Club Drive. Watch www.thevinewinebar.com/palm-desert-ca for details. Oh, by the way, it’s right next door to a new IW Coffee location! … Bit o’ Country, the diner at 418 S. Indian Canyon Drive, in Palm Springs, has reopened. It has new owners and has been tidied up a bit, but the greasy-spoon food and vibe remain (and we mean that in a good way). … There is good news and bad news from Bootlegger Tiki, the craft-cocktail joint at 1101 N. Palm Canyon Drive, in downtown Palm Springs. The good: The Tales of the Cocktail Foundation honored the bar with one of its Spirited Awards, for having one of the 10 Best Bar Teams in the western U.S. The bad: The leader of that team since the bar’s opening, Chad Austin, has departed Bootlegger and the Coachella Valley for greener pastures. Congrats to Bootlegger, and best wishes to Chad!

Published in Restaurant & Food News

The 2014 holiday season has officially arrived, and while many of us are busily planning schedules around parties and shopping, more and more of our neighbors are facing formidable food and resource shortages.

“Over the last 24 months, we’ve seen the monthly average number of people served meals in our region increase from 80,000 per month to 90,000-plus,” said Chantel Schuering, community relations director for the FIND Food Bank. “We get those numbers directly from each organization that partners with FIND to acquire food resources, and then we aggregate them here.”

Those partner organizations include almost all of the agencies who provide meals on a regular basis to those in need of food assistance. One such partner is The Well in the Desert, based in Palm Springs.

“I wish we had fewer customers, but we don’t, unfortunately,” remarked Arlene Rosenthal, president of the board at The Well. “And around Thanksgiving and Christmas, we get a lot of people who don’t use our services regularly, but at the holidays, find it difficult to provide totally for themselves.”

While the realities of life can be discouraging this time of year—especially to those working to lessen the impact of hunger on a daily basis—the holidays can be a time of happiness and encouragement as well.

“We usually get about 1,500 people on Christmas Day, and these are a combination of the working poor, seniors on fixed incomes and the homeless,” Rosenthal said. “We open the doors at noon, and we have hundreds of people waiting to attend. They walk down this aisle formed by volunteers on each side who are shaking hands and high-fivin’ with the kids and seniors and the homeless. I’ve seen people in tears. It just brings out the best in everybody, and it’s become my favorite event.”

At Martha’s Village and Kitchen in Indio, the demand for holiday assistance increases as well.

“We certainly do see a huge, huge increase of folks coming on the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays. Since they don’t have families or others to go to, they utilize our services,” said K. Magdalena Andrasevits, the president and CEO. “That’s why it’s so important that the community comes together, as they always have. So I always say thank you, thank you, thank you to the community for helping us to do what we can to help our neighbors in need.”

However, Andrasevits points out that hunger and a need for help aren’t just seasonal issues. “I probably echo every other service provider when I say that the need isn’t just at the holiday season; it is year-round.”

For Mike Thompson, executive director of the LGBT Community Center of the Desert in Palm Springs (which also operates the NestEggg Food Bank), one focus of his organization’s holiday assistance is on people’s emotional and psychological needs.

“What I would like to call attention to is our mental-health program, and specifically, our low-to-no-cost counseling services for older adults,” Thompson said. “The holiday season can be stressful times for those living alone who might feel isolated, so we’d like to highlight this counseling program and make sure that people understand this help is available.”

Thompson also mentioned specific holiday-time events that are being held by The Center. “We’ve got a ‘Paws and Claus’ event where people can bring their pet to see Santa Claus, and that takes place (in December). These events are designed to bring people together.”

How tough is it for assistance organizations to attract needed funds today?

“You know nonprofits are always in need of funding support, whether that be in-kind donations, volunteer time or financial resources,” Thompson said. “As people begin to think about their end-of-the-year tax-giving, we like to remind them that The Center is here, and remind them of the programs we have here that benefit the valley’s LGBT community, and ask that they consider supporting us.”

We asked Schuering of FIND how concerned she and her colleagues are about the increasing demand for services.

“It’s a constant state of concern,” she said. “But when you feed 90,000-plus people a month, no single donation will make or break your effort. When demand goes up, as we’ve seen recently, we’re always trying to connect people with other resources so that food doesn’t have to be the thing they give up in their lives. We do a lot of work connecting people with the food-stamp program, for instance. Some of the crazy rumors people hear are just horrible, and it’s enough to keep them from applying for funds that are set aside for them to use for food.”

In closing, Schuering offered this sobering holiday thought. “Every month, there are tens of thousands of Coachella Valley residents going hungry. Every month. We only have 440,000 residents year-around, so if 90,000 of them are hungry every month, that’s one out of every five of our neighbors. Those are numbers that you cannot ignore.”

FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO HELP:

FIND Food Bank: 760-775-3663; www.findfoodbank.org

The Well in the Desert: 760-327-8577; www.wellinthedesert.org

Martha’s Village and Kitchen: 760-347-4741; marthasvillage.org

LGBT Community Center of the Desert: 760-416-7790; www.thecenterps.org

Published in Local Issues

On a warm and breezy Saturday evening, the night’s festivities were just beginning at Georgie’s Alibi, at Azul in downtown Palm Springs.

You could feel the bass thumping from the music as you walked up the stairs to Georgie’s Alibi. Once inside, the pink and purple lights, bumping music and beautiful ladies set the mood just right for a night of dancing and socializing—and it was all happening thanks to a fairly new group called Boudoir Entertainment.

Boudoir Entertainment, also known as B.E., is an entertainment group that has a goal to “satisfy the nightlife needs for lesbians and queer women in the Coachella Valley in a unique atmosphere BY and FOR women,” according to creators Delfina Zarate, Alexis Ortega and Marie Elloso.

However, Boudoir Entertainment events aren’t just for women who like women; B.E. prides itself on not being an exclusive organization, in an effort to bring together the community.

“In order for us (Boudoir Entertatinment) to be successful, we need to be welcoming to all people in the community, not just in the LGBTQ community,” says Ortega.

Zarate echoes that statement. “Our organization is set apart from others in the community because Boudoir Entertainment is community-based and all about giving back.”

These three ladies want to support the community that they grew up in and that helped shape them into the women they are today. The three 20-somethings were all raised in the Coachella Valley, where regular events designed for gay men are prevalent—while events for lesbians are fewer and farther between.

Thus, Boudoir Entertainment is filling a void—while demonstrating a dedication to community. B.E. has helped out with multiple fundraising events for local nonprofit organizations. The most recent event Boudoir Entertainment helped promote was the sixth annual Mid-Summer Dance Party at the Ace Hotel and Swim Club, a benefit for the Desert AIDS Project.

Boudoir Entertainment has also donated money from its own activities as well. The group gave around $850 to the FIND Food Bank, by pledging a quarter of the profits from Boudoir’s 2013 Dinah Shore event, and by offering a raffle with a local hair salon.

Zarate, who works as a bartender, maintains that is it is her responsibility to “promote Boudoir (Entertainment) so it can be recognized for its value in the community.” Ortega, a Stanford grad and Palm Springs native who works for the Desert AIDS Project, is the woman in charge of social media, marketing and promoting the brand of Boudoir Entertainment, which is described as being “luscious, refreshing, alluring, mesmerizing, and ecstasizing” on the website. Elloso, a College of the Desert student, is the first contact who all newcomers encounter when they attend any Boudoir Entertainment event. She is also responsible for bringing in local talent, such as burlesque dancers and DJs, to perform.

According to Zarate, the idea of Boudoir Entertainment is to develop a “safe and comfortable space for lesbian and queer women to come together to hang out and socialize … to provide an atmosphere for women to be themselves, to be free to be who they want to be.”

Based on the growing interest and number of supporters, these ladies must be doing something right.

Boudoir at Georgie’s Alibi, at Azul, 369 N. Palm Canyon Drive, Palm Springs, takes place at 9 p.m., every other Saturday; the next event is on Saturday, Aug. 17. There is no cover. For more information and a complete calendar of events, visit boudoirnightlife.com, or look them up on Facebook.

 

Published in Local Fun