CVIndependent

Tue11242020

Last updateMon, 24 Aug 2020 12pm

Local Issues

15 Nov 2020
The surf is about to be up in the Coachella Valley. The Thermal Beach Club is a private residential/vacation community being developed on the privately held Kohl Ranch land, just north of the Salton Sea. The developers hope its beaches and waves are open by 2023 to members—people who can either pay $1 million or more for one of the 326 homes, or $175,000 annually for a non-resident club membership. Not surprisingly, some current residents of the Thermal and Oasis communities are dismayed by that prospect—and the marketing push being employed by their new neighbor has exacerbated their misgivings. That marketing promises an opulent lifestyle characterized as: “Adventure living. Wrapped in luxury.” Artist renderings and a promotional video reveal a 20-acre wave pool that will feature a continuous stream of waves in excess of six feet each. “Our communities have remained undefended for generations,” said a representative of the grassroots…
12 Nov 2020
Voters narrowly defeated Proposition 15, the tax measure that aimed to eliminate decades-long protections for commercial properties—dashing hopes of billions of dollars flowing into California’s cash-strapped public schools and community colleges in the coming years. In the second-most-expensive ballot fight this election, Prop 15 supporters said the measure would help right what they viewed as a fundamental wrong in the state’s school-funding system by increasing the share of property-tax revenues going toward schools. Opponents characterized Prop 15 as harmful to small businesses and the state’s economy at a time when the pandemic has already strained or shuttered several local businesses. “We’re the fifth-largest economy in the world,” said E. Toby Boyd, president of the California Teachers Association, the top benefactor for the Yes on 15 campaign, “and big corporations should be paying their fair share to invest in our students, our public schools, our families and our communities.” The measure—backed…
27 Oct 2020
On April 2, with COVID-19 establishing itself as both a financial and fatal threat, Gov. Gavin Newsom signed an executive order prohibiting water shutoffs by local water agencies. The order applied to all homes and small businesses in the state, protecting them from losing their access to water due to the nonpayment of service fees. “This executive order will help people who have been financially impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic by ensuring they have water service,” Gov. Newsom said at the time. “Water is critical to our very lives, and in this time, it is critically important that it is available for everyone.” Today, nearly seven months have passed since then, and the state is still mired in the pandemic—so questions are beginning to arise about how much debt is being accumulated, not only by the state’s water providers, but by customers who can’t afford to keep up with payments.…
23 Oct 2020
For decades, California teens who committed the most-serious crimes—robbery, assault, murder—were sent to state juvenile prisons to serve their sentences. Now that is about to change. A controversial new law that takes effect next year will dismantle the state’s current juvenile justice system and transfer responsibility for convicted youth back to counties. Orchestrated this year by Gov. Gavin Newsom in a swift move, the state’s Division of Juvenile Justice will no longer accept newly convicted young people after July 2021—leaving counties with less than a year to plan for where to house the state’s most-serious young offenders. Opponents say they were stunned by the speed of the decision, and how little input was solicited from counties, probation officials, youth advocates and others affected by the dramatic overhaul. “We were caught off guard when the administration put this policy into the works,” said Karen Pank, executive director of the Chief Probation…
20 Oct 2020
In 2013, there were approximately 267,000 undocumented LGBT immigrants in the United States, according to the Williams Institute at the UCLA School of Law. We were unable to find more-recent data on this community—and were also unable to determine the number of LGBTQ detainees held currently in the 211 detention centers operating in the United States, privately owned or under the aegis of U.S. Customs and Border Protection. However, there is anecdotal evidence that sizeable numbers undocumented LGBT immigrants are, in fact, being held in abusive conditions throughout our country. This reality first caught the attention of Ubaldo Boido and his partner, Craig Scott, when they were living comfortably in Los Angeles with their dog, Twink. They moved to Palm Springs in September of last year. “We got involved with the Los Angeles chapter of Democratic Socialists of America,” Boido said during a recent phone interview. “They have an immigration-justice…
21 Sep 2020
Gov. Gavin Newsom in July ordered all of the state’s school campuses to remain closed in counties where COVID-19 case rates remained too high, according to the state’s criteria. That list included Riverside County—and as of our press deadline, almost all local schools remained closed for in-person instruction. “We fully anticipated re-opening in the first week of July at all of our facilities,” said Desert Recreation District General Manager Kevin Kalman during a recent phone interview. “Then Riverside County had its infection rates start rising again. So what we had geared up for, and had been prepping our team for, all changed overnight. This ED-REC/Connect (ERC) program became the best activity we could think of to be truly relevant and helpful in this time. This pandemic is everybody’s problem—and our goal is to be part of the solution.” Since mid-August, the ERC has sponsored well-equipped, supervised distance-learning hubs at various…
04 Sep 2020
An academic year in which public education will intersect with public health has created back-to-school shopping lists unlike any other for California’s schools as they attempt to transition toward in-person instruction—once they have the state’s blessing. Bakersfield’s Panama-Buena Vista Union School District plans to hire a manager to handle contact tracing for a system of 19,000 students and 4,000 employees. Anaheim Union High School District spent more than $500,000 this summer on additional band instruments so students won’t have to share clarinets, saxophones and flutes. Among the few California schools to physically reopen, Yreka Union High School District near the Oregon border is spending about 10 percent more than it would in any given year to hire more maintenance staff to support exhaustive cleaning efforts. While an overwhelming majority of students began the year in distance learning, schools are preparing for that moment when schools physically open—sourcing personal protective equipment…
01 Sep 2020
Members of the Service Employees International Union-United Healthcare Workers West (SEIU-UHW) picketed at each of the three Tenet-operated hospitals in the area last week—claiming that employees at the hospitals need to take life-threatening risks every day to care for local patients battling COVID-19. The members formed picket lines at the Hi-Desert Medical Center in Joshua Tree on Wednesday, Aug. 26, before moving to the Desert Regional Medical Center in Palm Springs on Thursday, followed by Indio’s JFK Memorial Hospital on Friday. “The overlying reason is that we are in a contract negotiation right now, and at the same time, we are fighting to make sure that all of our workers are safe and have enough PPE, or personal protective equipment,” said union member Gisella Thomas via telephone before Friday’s picketing action in Indio. “Tenet is my employer. I’ve been a respiratory therapist for 48 years, and I’ve worked at Desert…
24 Aug 2020
For more than five years, Palm Springs residents and business owners have waited for the arrival of a showplace downtown park. In 2018, the Palm Springs City Council approved plans to deliver the attraction by the fall of this year—plans which were derailed by the arrival of the COVID-19 pandemic. “We’ve taken a long time to get to this point,” councilmember Lisa Middleton told the Independent, “and I want to see a completed project there.” Pretty much everyone agrees with that statement. However, there’s significant disagreement about how the project will be completed—which became apparent after a contentious 3-2 vote at the Aug. 6 Palm Springs City Council meeting. The short version of the controversy is this: Councilmembers Grace Garner, Christy Holstege and Dennis Woods voted to proceed with the original, fully funded plans for the park—overturning a decision made two months prior to scale back those plans and save…
20 Aug 2020
As the Aug. 31 finish line for the California State Legislature approaches, Assemblymember Eduardo Garcia and his colleagues are working hard to pass a package of bills designed to bring relief to the state’s farmworker communities and workplaces—which are struggling to cope with the COVID-19 pandemic. “We are making bold efforts to put forward policy that protects the health and safety of the farmworkers,” Garcia said during a recent interview with the Independent. “But, also, we’re looking at the economic security of workers, and we want to prevent disruptions in the nation’s food supply, which is as critical to all of us today as it was even before this pandemic. “We’ve got this series of five bills that we want to highlight. We had a press conference back in April about these issues, and after that discussion, the governor took a number of executive orders, like hazard pay (for essential…

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