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Media

16 Oct 2014
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This one has all the ingredients of a dreamed-up Hollywood blockbuster: A Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist uncovers a big story involving drugs, the CIA and a guerrilla army. Despite threats and intimidation, he writes an explosive exposé and catches national attention. But the fates shift: Our reporter’s story is torn apart by the country’s leading media; he is betrayed by his own newspaper. Though the big story turns out to be true, the writer commits suicide and becomes a cautionary tale. Hold on, though: The above is not fiction. Kill the Messenger, a film now playing at the Century Theatres at The River, is the true story of Sacramento-based investigative reporter Gary Webb, who earned both acclaim and notoriety for his 1996 San Jose Mercury News series that revealed the CIA had turned a blind eye to the U.S.-backed Nicaraguan Contras trafficking crack cocaine in South Central Los Angeles and elsewhere…
02 Aug 2013
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Gannett—the nation’s largest newspaper company, and the owner of The Desert Sun—today laid off dozens, if not hundreds, of employees across the country. The Independent has heard from a source that up to a half-dozen Desert Sun staffers, including one person from the news side—an editor—were let go today. Emails sent earlier today to publisher Mark Winkler and executive editor Greg Burton have not received a response as of this writing. A Facebook message sent to the veteran editor who was reportedly laid off has also gone unreturned. As of 5 p.m. Pacific time, Gannett Blog’s Jim Hopkins had received reports about a total of 202 layoffs and position-eliminations at 36 Gannett operations across the country. (Update 6:20 p.m.: Commenters at Gannett Blog are pointing out that a fair number of the people who were laid off are longtime Gannett employees—and therefore on the higher end of the pay scale.…
28 Jun 2013
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Si, buenas tardes?” Miriam Ceja chirped into the microphone at La Nueva Mix’s studio in Glenwood Springs, Colo. It was 5 p.m., “prime drive time,” on a Wednesday evening in late March. La Nueva Mix is primarily a music station, playing Norteño ballads and other Latin-American tunes. But since its debut six years ago, program director Axel Contreras has also introduced talk shows on health, real estate and dealing with police encounters. By far the most popular, though, is Punto Legal, a weekly immigration-law call-in. Ceja, an assistant at the law firm Hess and Schubert, is one of the show’s translators. Her boss, immigration attorney Ted Hess, who says he doesn’t speak “a lick of Spanish,” scribbled notes as she spoke. “I’ve been working without a Social Security card,” said the anonymous caller, who sounded like a young man. “Will I still be able to take advantage of immigration reform?”…

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