CVIndependent

Mon07132020

Last updateMon, 20 Apr 2020 1pm

Pets

18 Jun 2020
Nothing is more identified with the Fourth of July or summer celebrations than the display of fireworks. I love the beauty of fireworks—the excitement and the celebratory nature. But as a caregiver of pets, I despise the private and sometimes illegal backyard fireworks, which often take a toll on animals. I can manage planned fireworks with calming medicine, clothing or loud music—but not the random, louder-is-better explosions that set dogs on edge and panic them to the point of danger. According to the American Humane Society, July 5 is the busiest day of the year for shelters finding companion animals that fled in fear—breaking chains, jumping fences and running miles away in abject panic. Being prepared is important. There are some basic steps to take to keep your beloveds safe: • Microchip your animal, and make sure that your name and phone number are up to date. Update your dog’s…
18 May 2020
The heat sure rolled in quickly this year! OK, a confession: I feel this way every year. If we didn’t have the weather to complain about, we would be miserable! I dread the heat—but I wouldn’t want to live anywhere else. However, the hot weather poses unique challenges to our pets in the Coachella Valley. I reached out to Kimberly Raney, owner of Vet Tech to You, a new mobile veterinary-technician service, and asked her about the most important things a pet owner should think about in the hotter weather. Four things came to mind, she said: walking on heated surfaces; heat exhaustion; animals in cars; and other animal threats, like coyotes and snakes. Walking on heated surfaces: Dr. Pia Salk offers a “rule of paw” for judging safe pavement temperatures: Touch any outside surface for seven to eight seconds. If it causes pain, it’s not right for any animal…
19 Apr 2020
COVID-19 has put me into a haze. Each day runs into the next. My motivation is down, as the days of sheltering in place stretch out ahead, with no end in sight. I’m procrastinating a lot (as if that wasn’t a problem before). I go back and forth—from optimistic to pessimistic, discouraged to encouraged, depressed to grateful. My husband is considered an essential employee, and he commutes twice a week—an hour and a half each way. That brings a whole new level of worry. Compounding my concerns and fears is the lack of performance by the federal government in addressing this pandemic. Each day seems to bring some misrepresentation or attempted negation of facts—while people are dying in this great country. Our safety net has huge holes in it. At least there is evidence the measures in place in California have flattened the curve. But wondering what the future will…
18 Mar 2020
It’s so hard to know what to believe when it comes to the COVID-19 pandemic. So much misinformation is being posted and spread around. State, county and local governments have been forced to figure this out on their own—and that has left us hanging. I don’t want to get sick, and I really don’t want to have my friends and loved ones ill because we didn’t take things seriously enough. People need to take precautions—if not for themselves, out of care for others—and that includes the need to provide a plan for our best friends, our beloved companions: the animals that rely on us for safety and care. One bit of good news: According to World Small Animal Veterinary Association Global Veterinary Community, there is no evidence that companion animals can be infected by COVID-19. But we humans can, and we should always—not just in a crisis—have plans in place…
17 Feb 2020
The love we receive from our animals is deep, beautiful, unconditional and extraordinary. The relationships we have with our animals are incredible: You might be aggravated with all the humans in your house or even in your life—but the magic woofie or kitty will always save the day. Whether you’re returning home for a trip or a simple errand outside, a pet is always happy to see you, wagging or barking to welcome you. This magical relationship makes it even more difficult, painful and heartbreaking to say goodbye. No matter how many years they live, it is never enough—and sadly, we often must make the decision to end their lives. It’s terrible to watch the decline of a pet. Sometimes it seemingly comes on suddenly—our eyes are opened for the first time to a slowing gait, a missed jump onto the couch, or the inability to finish the usual walk.…
21 Jan 2020
Earlier this month, Gov. Gavin Newsom called for California to become a “no-kill” state by including $50 million in his budget for the University of California at Davis to create a new grant-based system to help shelters achieve the goal of no longer euthanizing treatable cats and dogs. Making California no-kill is an outstanding and commendable goal. Animal shelters almost always kill animals simply because of a lack of space. Hold times for animals in a shelter can range from no time at all for animals surrendered by owners, to five days or less for an unchipped stray, to 10 days or more for a microchipped animal. Hold times are up to the discretion of the shelter manager or shelter veterinarian—and animals that show any sign of illness or unfriendliness often end up on a euthanasia list. It’s a matter of simple math: The only way to reduce the animal-shelter…

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