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Last updateTue, 18 Sep 2018 1pm

There is a stigma that often comes from women talking about menstruation publicly. And the shame happens in many ways.

Last year, the online publication Jezebel published an article titled called “What Life Is Like When Getting Your Period Means You Are Shunned.” It profiled the life of a 16-year-old girl in Western Nepal named Radha, who, like all the other women in her village, could “not enter her house or eat anything but boiled rice” while she was menstruating. Radha was not allowed to touch other people during her menstruation cycle, because she’d “pollute them” and perhaps make them sick.

She wasn't allowed to sleep in her own house. She must join the rest of the women in the village who happen to be menstruating that week in a tiny shed far away from the village.

The Western world claims to be more progressive, yet even here, there are many forms of shaming menstruating. Consider the way in which menstrual products are usually commercialized and advertized in “stylish,” cool, colorful containers. It sends a message to women: If they own the cool, colorful products, that will lessen the shame that comes from being a human woman with a healthy, working body.

For me, as a young girl raised locally, it always seemed like a periods were taboo subject. The community I grew up in (Mecca, located on the east side of the Coachella Valley) is mostly Latino/Hispanic, and parts of that culture have deeply rooted patriarchal and misogynistic ideas about what it is to be Latina; girls internalize these ideas as they grow up. Adding to the taboo is the fact that women and girls in the 21st century grow up within a highly sexualized culture, further internalizing the idea that their bodies are objects for men to lust over—with health not even being prioritized.

According to the zine Menstruation Sensation by Alyssa Beers, in the U.S. alone, there are 73 million menstruating women right now. So why can't we talk about it without everyone cringing or crying out, “Gross!”

From 4 to 6:30 p.m. this Friday, Jan. 23, we’re holding an event at Raices Cultura, located at 1494 Sixth St., in Coachella. This event will include a discussion of alternative menstrual products that are not talked about in the mainstream media. These alternative menstrual products are also not as available in stores as tampons and sanitary pads—yet the benefits of using reusable menstrual products are huge.

Tampon applicators and disposable pads are made of oil-based polyethylene plastics. They just add to the country’s dependency on oil companies, and they contribute to the thinning of the ozone layer while they are being fabricated. The Menstruation Sensation zine states that in 1999, 1.4 million pads, 2.4 million tampons and 700,000 panty liners were disposed of daily. Annually, more than 12 billion tampons and napkins are disposed of. And we all know climate change isn't a made-up thing.

If that isn't enough for you to consider looking into reusable menstrual products, then look into TSS (toxic shock syndrome), which can come from using tampons. Men and children have also been known to been affected by it.

There’s one more reason to like reusable menstrual products: They save you a lot of money. Who doesn't like saving money?

During the event, two other presenters and I will be discussing and presenting the different types of menstrual products, where to get them, and even how to make them yourselves.

The youngest presenter, Cynthia Portillo, is 17 and a filmmaker. “We can improve so much just by knowing how and why our body works,” she says, which is true—a lot of women don't seem to fully understand their body and often don’t want to understand their body, due to fat-shaming, cat-calling, slut-shaming and, of course, menstruation stigma.

It'll be a safe space for girls and women to share, learn and converse about their bodies and health. No shaming will be allowed! If men want to join, that's also cool, but they must come willing to learn and engage in the conversation in a mature, non-sexist way. 

For more information, visit the event’s Facebook page.

Published in Community Voices

In 2003 and 2004, an ambitious group of young Latino community organizers and activists, all raised in the eastern Coachella Valley, returned home after earning college degrees.

They were known as over-achievers in their hometowns, and they searched each other out, they say, because they were determined to make a difference. They wanted to improve the lives of their friends and loved ones in the barrios and farm fields of the eastern valley, in part by gaining power via the political process.

A decade later, it’s clear: These organizers and activists, all Democrats, are making a mark and attaining many of their lofty goals.

V. Manuel Perez recently was elected to the Coachella City Council after three terms in the State Assembly. Eduardo Garcia swapped places with Perez, sort of: He just joined the State Assembly after serving as Coachella’s mayor. Maria Machuca is the president of the Coachella Valley Unified School District Board. Most notably, Dr. Raúl Ruiz is beginning his second term representing the Coachella Valley in Congress.

We talked to these young leaders about how they attained their current success—and what they have in mind for the future.


“I grew up in Cochelita, which was one of the toughest areas in Coachella Valley at the time, and we saw the injustices at an early age,” recalled V. Manuel Perez, who successfully ran for a Coachella City Council seat this year after a failed bid for the Riverside County Board of Supervisors. (He was term-limited out of the Assembly.) “Why was it that in my barrio, there weren’t any parks, so we had to play football and tag in the middle of our street, where drive-by shootings were ongoing? And why was it that my parents would come home from work as farmworkers late in the day, only to go to work early the next day so that they were too tired to help me with my homework? And why, whenever I had a toothache, did we have to wait until the end of the week to go to Mexicali to see the dentist, because we didn’t have health insurance?”

Garcia was first elected to the Coachella City Council in 2004 and became mayor two years later, not too long after finishing college. “What I remember quite vividly is that there was a group of us who happened to be returning to the Coachella Valley from other endeavors,” Garcia said. “In my case, I was returning from finishing my undergraduate work at UC Riverside. Manny (Perez) had been organizing and working in the central and Northern California areas (after his graduation from UC Riverside and Harvard University post-graduate work), and a few others were returning from college. We all got together and really started organizing community events in and around the cultural and art arena, with a specific objective to raise consciousness about issues affecting our community.”

Machuca (right) graduated from Coachella Valley High School and continued on to Cal State San Bernardino. “And I always said that my goal after getting a college degree was to come back home regardless,” she said.

Josseth Mota, the current community services coordinator for the Coachella Valley Housing Coalition, introduced Machuca to the group of young men, including Perez and Garcia, who had started meeting regularly to launch a community-service organization that could make a difference in their hometowns. She was already doing work with the Fair Housing Council and the Mecca Community Council.

“They told me they’d really like to get some women involved in their group, because then, it was a whole bunch of guys,” she recalled. “They said, ‘We need mujeres (women), because when a movement is going on, it’s pretty much the mujeres who move things forward. So I was interested, but I was going to be the only girl in this group with these guys who I’d only heard of back in high school.

“I knew Eddie Garcia, because he was a year ahead of me at Coachella Valley High School. Victor Manuel (Perez), I had heard about when I was in elementary school, because he was the guy who went to Harvard, and that was huge for us. And Raúl Ruiz, I knew because when we were in high school, some of us wanted to start an Aztec dancing club, and Joe Mota said he knew this guy who could teach us how to do the Aztec sun dance. The problem was that this guy was waiting to hear if he would be accepted at UCLA to go to medical school. … Back then, really, nobody from our background made it to that kind of college.”

After teaching several lessons, Ruiz indeed went off to medical school. “The next time I saw him was when he came back after he’d gotten his medical degrees. He was working at Eisenhower Medical Center, and he joined our Raices meetings,” she said. (More on those meetings later.)

Perez has known Ruiz—whose office did not respond to an interview request for this story—since he was a kid.

“Raúl and I grew up together and played Little League ball together,” Perez said. “We were in high school for four years together, and he was always president, and I was his secretary, treasurer and director of assemblies. When he went to UCLA, I was at UC Riverside, where I was an organizer, and he was organizing at UCLA. So we would have lots of discussions, but once he went off to Harvard Medical School, I kept strong ties here locally. Then I went out to Harvard as well, and Raúl and I were roommates there for a short time. So we would talk about these issues, but as far as the strategy to run for office and build a political infrastructure in Coachella Valley, that began in 2003-2004. When Raul came home, that’s when he began to engage. That was in 2008, and that’s when he decided to run for office as well.”

By the time Ruiz returned to the valley, Perez, Garcia, Machuca and others had already started building what they called their Raices infrastructure.

“Its emphasis was to educate politically, perform community outreach, and find individuals who we can transition from the conscious to the critical consciousness—so that perhaps they recognize their self-power, their self-agency, so that they can say, ‘You know what? There are things that we can change here. There are things we can transform,’” Perez said.

However, Perez was quick to point out that Raices also stemmed from the efforts of leaders from generations before, “from the Coachella Valley Voters League organization, whose members really put an emphasis on building political capital in the eastern Coachella Valley, to the movement of Cesar Chavez and the United Farmworkers, in which many of our parents were engaged.”

Perez was the president of Raices when it was founded in 2004.

“I always felt while organizing that we have to hold ourselves accountable to each other, and the best way to do that is by having an infrastructure, an organization that has a mission,” he said. “Because what I’ve learned through organizing in other areas throughout California is that if you identify someone who should run for office, and if these individuals are not accountable to an entity larger than themselves, they stop working with the collective and for its goals.

“We felt we had to form an organization that would do three things. First was to build and develop the political voice of the eastern Coachella Valley; second was to develop and create access to healthier communities; and the last was to utilize the cultural arts for social activism. Those were the three points of emphasis for Raices that exist to this day.”

Machuca said the development of Raices into a fully formed nonprofit organization was the organic result of the group’s shared aspirations.

“When we started meeting around founding Raices, it was weird how we had known of each other years ago, but now we were connecting to do something for our communities,” Machuca said. “So it felt genuine; it felt real; it felt like we were going to make a difference for the generations that came after us and give them something that we couldn’t have, and didn’t have. We were meeting once a week, and then it became twice a week, and then it became almost every night, because we were that passionate about putting this organization together and getting it off the ground.”

The group was initially called Youth for Change, but the members eventually decided the movement needed to involve everyone, not just young people.

“It was at one of those meetings that we came up with the name Raices,” she said. “It was supposed to be an acronym for something, but we never came to an agreement on what those words would be.”


Garcia said a key moment in Raices’ history came when the group screened a documentary by Antonio Gonzalez Vasquez called Living on the Dime: A View of the World From Along the I-10.

“This video had to do with the growth and development of the Inland Empire and the impact of building the Interstate 10 freeway right through those communities,” he explained. “And by impact, I mean how the I-10 divided communities into east/west/north/south, how it brought about different socio-economic groups in the region, and how the political structure began to govern in a way that gave us a division between the haves and the have-nots.

“We showcased the film at Cesar Chavez Elementary School in Coachella with the idea of beginning a conversation among the residents about the importance of growth and development in Coachella and the eastern end of the Coachella Valley. This was at a time when we were just beginning to see all the development and building activity that was going to occur. So that was our first real ‘action’ that triggered the discussion about responsible growth and development strategies for the city of Coachella, and whether areas of the city were being planned out responsibly to benefit both existing residents and the new residents in terms of developing public amenities like city parks and community centers.

“From there, members of the group moved on to discussions of direct involvement and representation of our Latino citizens at the government level. So, I’m simplifying things here, but that really was the first action that led ultimately to several of us running for public office.”

In 2004, Perez ran for the CVUSD school board, while Garcia ran for the Coachella City Council. Their campaigns did not go off without a hitch.

“As we started organizing some of the campaign events and actions, we began to feel the division between us and some of the elders in the community,” Machuca said. “We wanted to work with them, but it seemed that they saw us either as young and naïve, or as being in over our heads, as we were trying to change our world. At first it, it wasn’t too bad, but then as people began declaring that they were going to run for so many local positions, the division became a reality. It became: ‘How dare you disrespect us elders by running against us!’ Although it was never really said in so many words, it felt that way.”

Still, Perez and Garcia went on to win their races.

“We bonded even more during the real grassroots effort of those campaigns,” Machuca said. “We learned so much about the dos and the don’ts of campaigning and just how dirty things can get. We tried to play nice, because at the end of the day, we didn’t want the community to be divided. And we had a lot of community support, which showed in the results of the elections. We were young, had new ideas, and we grew up there. Some of the opposition ran their campaigns on platforms criticizing the fact that we left our communities to get college degrees. … But we came back!”

Despite the political wins, some of the people within Raices did not like the political direction in which the group was going. “They wanted to stick only with the arts, culture and community-building aspects of our mission,” Machuca said.

Ultimately, those dissenting members prevailed, as the original organization has been transformed into Raices Cultura.

“Today, Raices is focused on its nonprofit work and bringing about opportunities for Latino youth by utilizing our indigenous art and culture as the anchor,” Garcia said. “But everything is done with a community focus to create a critical consciousness in our youth to look at ways to improve their lives and the lives of others in their community, despite the barriers and challenges that many times exist in communities like ours. That is the focus of Raices today.”

While Perez may see more of a link between the nonprofit and the development of future eastern Coachella Valley community leaders than Garcia does, he perceived a change in direction as well.

“It’s morphed over the years,” Perez said. “When we first started, we recognized that we needed to continue to think of ways we could change things politically and change the institutions of power. But at the same time, we knew that as we grew older, eventually, the next generation will need to take the lead. So back in the day, what we would do, for example, is bring in computers and provide tutorial services on how to access higher education in the hope that afterward, they’d come back home. Now it’s more about offering instruction concerning cultural identity, and for that matter, self-love. A lot of courses are based on spirituality and the teachings of the Aztecs and the Mayans, a lot of indigenous culture … .

“Also, there’s an emphasis on trying to influence individuals toward self-love as opposed to self-hate. What we’ve seen for years is youth violence—youth-on-youth shootings, and gangs, drug abuse and domestic violence. A lot of that comes from the anger that develops in a person because of the oppression that they’ve had to endure for so many years. So the teaching that goes on today is helping to develop individuals with more positivity in their lives. That spirituality piece is really, really important.”


What’s in store for the political arm of this heavily Latino community-service collective? Perez said there’s a lot of work left to do.

“We identified people over the years who have engaged in our campaigns,” he said. “In the Ruiz campaigns and also in mine, you’d see a lot of youth out knocking on doors, passing out literature and phone-banking. So that’s kind of a training ground where the young people get to see up close what we as candidates go through. … Some of these youngsters have gone on to higher education and are now leaders with organizations that are registering people to vote, like Voto Latino, or for that matter, are doing organizing work with UFW (United Farm Workers).”

Perez said he always made it a point to offer internships to youths who wanted to learn about the policy-making process.

“What does it really mean when you work on an issue, and then pass a policy?” he asked. “How do you connect those dots? For instance, what does it mean if we pass legislation on a safe route to school that has some funding attached, but in Coachella or Mecca or Thermal, there’s a lack of sidewalks? … It’s not about an individual; it’s about a collective, a movement. And ultimately, it’s about achieving social justice through policy, organizing and developing the human being’s capacity as social capital, and to finally turn our community around in ways that are very positive.”

To accomplish those ends, the policy-making representatives of these eastern valley communities need to maintain their political presence. Garcia envisions a solidification of power in a more formal organization informed by the Raices Cultura ideals.

“The question is: Will Raices Cultura programs and participants influence the development of a democratic political structure that weighs in on issues of local, state and national significance? The answer is yes,” Garcia said. “It happens by natural progression, and I think what’s missing here is the actual organization of an official Democratic club which attributes its beginnings to the formation of Raices 10 years ago, and is a political organization and framework … able to lead the charge on issues of policy and importance to our community. I think we’re getting there, and will very soon create an organization from the eastern Coachella Valley that is strictly political and on the Democratic side of the spectrum.”

Below: Eduardo Garcia: “I think what’s missing here is the actual organization of an official Democratic club which attributes its beginnings to the formation of Raices 10 years ago, and is a political organization and framework … able to lead the charge on issues of policy and importance to our community.” PHOTO BY KEVIN FITZGERALD

Published in Politics

Film

Family Movie Night: Free Birds

Families and friends of all ages can enjoy a free screening of Free Birds. No tickets needed; just come for a fun-filled flick. 6:30 p.m., Friday, Nov. 21. Free. Indio Community Park, 45871 Clinton St., Indio. Myrecreationdistrict.com.

Special Events

27th Annual Hoedown at Sundown

The evening commences with an open bar, appetizers and a silent auction, and is followed with Western barbeque fare at 7 p.m. At 8:30 p.m., guests can kick up their heels to music and instructional line-dancing, as well as a live auction. Patrick Evans is the emcee, and all the fun benefits the 44 locations of the YMCA in our desert cities. 5:30 p.m., Saturday, Nov. 1. $135. Agua Caliente Casino Resort Spa, 32250 Bob Hope Drive, Rancho Mirage. 760-341-9622; www.ymcaofthedesert.org.

AMFM Fest

Art. Music. Film. More. A creative feast in the Cali desert for progressive artists, musicians, filmmakers, designers, curators, creators and culture-makers. All movies will be shown at the Mary Pickford Theatre. Venues vary for art, music, panels, parties and special events. Thursday, Nov. 13, through Sunday, Nov. 16. Prices and venues vary. Amfmfest.com.

Fourth Annual Italian Festival

This community event to celebrate the Italian heritage and culture features vendors, performers and a family fun zone. Taste the Italian flavor of fine restaurants, create your own Venetian mask, ride the Buckets o’ Fun and enjoy a special Italian-themed puppet show. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Saturday, Nov. 1, and Sunday, Nov. 2. $10 one day pass; $15 two-day pass, with discounts. La Quinta Civic Center Campus, 78495 Calle Tampico, La Quinta. Desertarc.org/italian-festival.shtml.

Eighth Annual Fall Family Festival

This festive occasion brings together fun games, arts and crafts and community resources for Coachella Valley families in one joyous celebration. Main Street in Old Town La Quinta will be closed off and lined with more than 50 exhibitors and vendors, all with a family focus and activities for children. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday, Nov. 8. Free. Old Town La Quinta, Main Street, La Quinta. 760-342-7400; www.aboutfamiliesinc.com.

Gourmet Food Truck Event

Try food trucks for lunch featuring burgers, barbecue, tacos, California cuisine, sushi and dessert. Outdoor seating is available, or bring a blanket. Dabble in the local farmers’ market; listen to music provided by The Coachella Valley Art Scene; enjoy a beer garden with some of the best craft beers from La Quinta Brewing Company and Coachella Valley Brewing Company. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., the first Sunday of the month. Free. Cathedral City Civic Center Plaza, 68700 Avenue Lalo Guerrero, Cathedral City. Thecoachellavalleyartscene.com.

Hike 4 Education

Three-, five- and 10-mile hikes for all ages benefit technology in Desert Sands Unified School District classrooms. 8 a.m., Sunday, Nov. 2. $15 to $30. Lake Cahuilla Recreation Area, 58075 Jefferson St., La Quinta. 760-609-4622; desertsandseducationalfoundation.org/hike.html.

Hollywood Dine and Dish II: A Star-Studded Dining Event to Support AIDS Assistance Program

Join comedienne extraordinaire and “Love Goddess” Judy Tenuta, the effervescent Ruta Lee, award-winning photographer of the stars Michael Childers, and Emmy Award-winning comedy writer Bruce Vilanch for a one-of-a-kind evening. One hundred percent of each ticket will feed five AAP clients for one month. 7 p.m., Saturday, Nov. 1. $500; $750 couple; 100 percent tax-deductible. At a private residence; info given following ticket purchase. 760-325-8481; aidsassistance.org.

Indio Powwow

Hosted by the Cabazon Band of Mission Indians, the powwow features Native American drums, dancing and singing, plus arts and crafts, and traditional Native American foods. Various times Friday through Sunday, Nov. 28-30. Free. Fantasy Springs Resort Casino, 84245 Indio Springs Parkway, Indio. 760-238-5770; www.fantasyspringsresort.com.

Palm Springs Leather Pride

Celebrate the anniversary of the Palm Springs Leather Order of the Desert with a weekend-long event that has become a centerpiece of the West Coast leather scene, featuring parties, leather-formal events and the Mr. Palm Springs Leather Contest and Silent Auction. Thursday, Oct. 30, through Sunday, Nov. 2. Prices and locations vary. Desertleatherpride.com.

Playa De Los Muertos: A Dia De Los Muertos Celebration

The event features a sangria bar, tray passed (appetizers) inspired by the traditional Mexican holiday, and lots of entertainment from DJs Von Kiss, plus COLOUR VISION and DJ Aaron C. Proceeds from the event will benefit Meals on Wheels, whose volunteers deliver more than 170,000 meals to homebound individuals from Palm Springs to the Salton Sea each year. 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., Saturday, Nov. 1. $45. Hacienda Cantina and Beach Club, 1555 S. Palm Canyon Drive, Palm Springs. 760-778-8954; playadelosmuertos.bpt.me.

Raices Cultura Annual Dia de los Muertos

The Ninth Annual Dia de los Muertos event, hosted by Raices Cultura, closes Coachella’s Sixth Street for experience-art displays, large-scale installations, performances, and arts and crafts activities. 6 to 11 p.m., Saturday, Nov. 1. Free. Sixth Street in Coachella. 760-428-8763; www.raicesdelvalle.org/muertos.

Stroke Recovery Center’s 35th Annual Winter Wonderland Ball: A Night at the Copa

Stroke Recovery Center’s annual black-tie gala features cocktails, a delicious dinner and dancing with music by Wayne Foster Entertainment. Proceeds go directly to caring for survivors of stroke and traumatic brain injury who, along with their families, receive free year-round, long-term rehabilitation, counseling and education at the center. 6 p.m., Saturday, Nov. 22. $350. Riviera Palm Springs, 1600 N. Indian Canyon Drive, Palm Springs. 760-323-7676; galasrc.org.

The USO Variety Show

The USO has been entertaining troops worldwide in times of peace and times of war for more 70 years. Now, the Bob Hope USO needs you to laugh, enjoy and have some fun remembering the good ol’ times. Join us for live nostalgic tributes to Bob Hope and his band of Hollywood celebs; enjoy free tours of the museum pre- or post-showtime. 2 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 13. $55 to $75. Palm Springs Air Museum, 745 N. Gene Autry Trail, Palm Springs. 760-778-6262; palmspringsvacationtravel.com.

Wild Pride Party

In association with Greater Palm Springs Pride, this fun event will benefit the Living Desert and Palm Springs Pride. Ticket includes food and one signature drink, with a cash bar all evening, plus music by master DJ Luc Benech; Bella da Ball makes a special appearance. 5:30 to 9 p.m., Wednesday, Nov. 5. $30. The Living Desert, 47900 Portola Ave., Palm Desert. 760-346-5694; www.livingdesert.org/event/wild-pride-party.

Visual Arts

Art Under the Umbrellas

The event presents a diverse collection of 80 talented artists exhibiting their original creations along Old Town La Quinta’s picturesque Main Street. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday, Nov. 15 and 29. Free. Old Town La Quinta, Main Street, La Quinta. 760-564-1244; lqaf.com.

Desert Art Festival

A three day art event featuring numerous artists presenting their original work in all mediums of two-- and three-dimensional fine art, including paintings in acrylic, oils and watercolors, photography, etchings, sculpture in clay, glass, metal, stone and wood. Each artist will be present to meet with the public and discuss their work. All work is available for purchase. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Friday through Sunday, Nov. 28-30. Free. Frances Stevens Park, 538 N. Palm Canyon Drive, Palm Springs. 818-813-4478; westcoastartists.com/shows/ps5.html.

A Grand Adventure: American Art in the West

The epic 19th-century landscape paintings of Yosemite and Yellowstone by Albert Bierstadt and Thomas Moran introduced the American public to the grandeur of the West. By the turn of the century, a new genre of Western art had developed. A Grand Adventurebrings together 40 significant classic and traditional artworks from private collections. The artworks span nearly 100 years, dating from the latter half of the 19th century through the early decades of the 20th century. The exhibit is on display through Sunday, Jan. 4, 2015. Included with regular admission prices. Palm Springs Art Museum in Palm Desert, 72567 Highway 111, Palm Desert. 760-346-5600; www.psmuseum.org/palm-desert.

Twentynine Palms Weed Show

The Weed Show is one of Twentynine Palms’ oldest and most unique artistic traditions. This annual display, now in its seventh decade, features artistic arrangements of indigenous desert vegetation as well as found objects both natural and manmade. Awards are granted in nine categories, with a “People’s Choice” award to be decided by visitors to the exhibition. Noon to 4 p.m., Saturday, Nov. 8; and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Sunday, Nov. 9. Free. Old Schoolhouse Museum, 6760 National Park Drive, Twentynine Palms. 29palmshistorical.com.

Submit your free arts listings at calendar.artsoasis.org. The listings presented above were all posted on the ArtsOasis calendar, and formatted/edited by Coachella Valley Independent staff. The Independent recommends calling to confirm all events information presented here.

Published in Local Fun

A smile grows on Jacqueline Aguilar’s face when she talks about local art and her community.

Aguilar, a senior at Coachella Valley High School, is passionate about these topics—and she’s eager to share her insight with anyone willing to listen.

Aguilar represented Raices Cultura when she spoke about art and her community to an audience of city planners at the 2014 Annual Conference of the American Planning Association’s California Chapter in Anaheim in mid-September.

“I was really nervous. I was shaking,” Aguilar said. “I’m not usually that nervous, but people started showing up, and it was really weird to have such a large audience.”

Aguilar and other youth representatives from the eastern Coachella Valley participated in a youth panel at the annual conference titled “Legitimate Voices: Youth Perspectives on the Meaning of Building Healthy Communities in the Eastern Coachella Valley.”

The youth panel was an opportunity for planners to hear from youth who are working in the Eastern Coachella Valley. The Building Healthy Communities Initiative was represented by Adriana Diaz-Ordaz, and Pueblo Unido CDC was represented by Sahara Huazano and Victor Gonzalez.

Daisy Ramirez, a health education assistant for the County of Riverside Department of Public Health, said she was proud of the panel, because the youth representatives were able to better educate the planners about the work that is going on in the eastern Coachella Valley.

“Some planners didn’t even know where the eastern Coachella Valley was, or what was going on in the eastern Coachella Valley,” Ramirez said. “Sometimes, we assume people already know.”

The youth panel met again on Sept. 22 at the Building Healthy Communities office in Coachella to debrief. Diaz-Ordaz and Huazano both said they felt honored to present their community projects to people who are responsible for planning future communities.

“There’s this realm, or sphere of influence, that comes with being a planner,” Diaz-Ordaz said. “There’s that network, there’s that community, and that social capital that comes along with even being in that place.”

At the conference, Huazano and Gonzalez presented Pueblo Unido’s Coachella Valley Mobile Home Pavement Project, which is aimed at improving the health of more than 400 families in 39 mobile home parks in the eastern Coachella Valley. Huazano said the conference helped her identify skills she needs to build in order to keep representing the eastern Coachella Valley well.

“I’ve been thinking of how I can improve my speaking skills, because I want to continue on doing this work.” Huazano said. “And in order for me to represent my community how they deserve, I need to learn how to speak properly.”

Miguel Vazquez, the co-chair for the California Planning Roundtable Healthy Communities Workgroup, organized the panel and moderated the session. At the debriefing, Vazquez said he’d never heard an audience applaud so long for a panel.

Vasquez encouraged the youth presenters to use the momentum they built at the conference to keep working on community issues.

“It would be really cool if something came out of this, and next year, we could go back and say, ‘Remember that group of youth? Well, they did this. And it wasn’t futile,’” Vasquez said.

Alejandra Alarcon is a reporter for Coachella Unincorporated, a youth media organization in the east Coachella Valley, funded by the Building Healthy Communities Initiative of the California Endowment and operated by New America Media in San Francisco. The purpose is to report on issues in the community that can bring about change. “Coachella Unincorporated” refers to the region youth journalists cover, but also to the unincorporated communities of the Eastern Valley with the idea to “incorporate” the East Valley into the mainstream Coachella Valley mindset. For more information, visit coachellaunincorporated.org.

Published in Local Issues