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18 Apr 2015

The Nail That Sticks Up: Blake Kushi Is Magnificent as a Real-Life Hero in CV Rep's 'Hold These Truths'

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The Nail That Sticks Up: Blake Kushi Is Magnificent as a Real-Life Hero in CV Rep's 'Hold These Truths' Sal Mistretta

There’s an old Japanese proverb, “Deru kugi wa utareru.” It basically means: “The nail that sticks up is the one that gets hit.” It represents Japan’s conformist tendencies, and the long-held belief that an individual should never rock the boat.

It’s also the underlying theme of the Coachella Valley Repertory Theatre’s season-ending production, Hold These Truths, written by Jeanne Sakata and starring Blake Kushi. Originally staged in 2007 as Dawn’s Light: The Journey of Gordon Hirabayashi, it chronicles the true story of Hirabayashi, a second-generation Japanese American who had the guts to rock the boat by resisting the legally mandated internment of Japanese citizens during World War II.

The oldest son of a truck driver, Gordon learns about discrimination early on. As a young boy, after he tries to come to the aid of an injured dog in the street, a white man screams at him and his mother: “Get out of our country, you fucking Japs!” Local businesses hang signs warning, “Japs, go home!” During his first trip to New York, Gordon is relieved at the lack of such signs, and his ability to eat at a restaurant without being thrown out.

Hirabayashi is studying at the University of Washington in 1942 when President Franklin D. Roosevelt issues Executive Order 9066, which requires that all West Coast residents of Japanese descent be sent to internment camps. Hirabayashi refuses to join the ranks of the hundreds who obeyed, in the process losing their homes, businesses and self-respect.

He writes a letter to the government explaining his actions—but he’s arrested for refusing the evacuation order. The legal defense group that takes up Hirabayashi’s cause claims the 1942 executive order violated the Fifth Amendment, which prohibits the seizure of property and rights without due process of law.

Hirabayashi’s case goes all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court in 1943, where he eloquently argues that ancestry is not a crime, and passionately declares: “I am an American.” However, he ultimately loses. After requesting a 90-day sentence rather than a 60-day sentence (it’s the only way he can serve it outdoors), Hirabayashi hitchhikes all the way to Tucson, Ariz., to serve his prison time in a labor camp.

The play depicts Hirabayashi’s subsequent marriage to his college sweetheart, the births of his children and his successful teaching career. Forty years later, he gets a phone call from a law professor who has unearthed old evidence that there was no military necessity for the mass incarceration. In 1987, Hirabayashi’s conviction was overturned, and in 2012, he was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Barack Obama, just a couple of months after his death.

Not bad for a nail that stuck up.

Carrying a show alone that’s nearly two hours long is not easy, especially when the show deals with such heavy duty issues. Thankfully, both Jeanne Sakata’s writing and Blake Kushi’s performance are excellent. The script has many upbeat—and some downright funny—moments. Kushi has a great stage presence, and is very likable, which this role requires. Throughout the play, Kushi also portrays Hirabayashi’s father, mother, college friends and lawyer, as well as several other characters, all with great skill.

As always, Ron Celona’s direction is quite good. The simple set is effective, and the use of newsreel photos (flashed on downstage screens) and radio broadcasts from the era take the audience back in time.

Hold These Truths is a fabulous choice to end CV Rep’s season, which carried the theme “The American Melting Pot.” Don’t miss it. It will make you laugh, think and perhaps shed a tear or two. And it reminds us all that rocking the boat is sometimes necessary—in fact, it can change history.

Hold These Truths is performed at 7:30 p.m., Wednesday through Saturday; and 2 p.m., Saturday and Sunday, through Sunday, May 3, at the Coachella Valley Repertory Theatre, 69930 Highway 111, in Rancho Mirage. (There is now show at 2 p.m. on Saturday, April 18.) The running time is just less than two hours, including a 10-minute intermission. Tickets are $45, with a special rate of $15 for children and college students with an I.D. For tickets or more information, call 760-296-2966, or visit www.cvrep.org.

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