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Last updateTue, 18 Sep 2018 1pm

1. Earth to Echo* (20th Century Fox)

2. The Purge: Anarchy* (Universal)

3. Deliver Us From Evil (Sony)

4. Mr. Peabody and Sherman* (20th Century Fox)

5. X-Men: Days of Future Past* (20th Century Fox)

6. Sex Tape (Sony)

7. Edge of Tomorrow (Warner Bros.)

8. A Million Ways to Die in the West (Universal)

9. Transformers: Age of Extinction (Paramount)

10. The Fluffy Movie* (Universal)

* Available for rental before Redbox and Netflix

Published in Video Top 10

1. Earth to Echo* (20th Century Fox)

2. The Purge: Anarchy* (Universal)

3. Neighbors (Universal)

4. X-Men: Days of Future Past* (20th Century Fox)

5. Sex Tape (Sony)

6. Mr. Peabody and Sherman* (20th Century Fox)

7. Transformers: Age of Extinction (Paramount)

8. A Million Ways to Die in the West* (Universal)

9. The Fluffy Movie* (Universal)

10. Snowpiercer (Anchor Bay)

* Available for rental before Redbox and Netflix

Published in Video Top 10

1. Neighbors (Universal)

2. Transformers: Age of Extinction (Paramount)

3. X-Men: Days of Future Past* (20th Century Fox)

4. Edge of Tomorrow* (Warner Bros.)

5. Godzilla (Warner Bros.)

6. Mr. Peabody and Sherman* (20th Century Fox)

7. Blended (Warner Bros.)

8. A Million Ways to Die in the West* (Universal)

9. Chef* (Universal)

10. Brick Mansions (20th Century Fox)

* Available for rental before Redbox and Netflix

Published in Video Top 10

I’m not a hater of X-Men Origins: Wolverine; I thought it was stupid fun. I am in the minority, though, so along came The Wolverine, a new attempt to take Hugh Jackman’s Logan into a freestanding franchise.

Directed by James Mangold (3:10 to Yuma), The Wolverine goes in a darker, more-serious direction, although the film still includes some fine action scenes. (The opening scene in Nagasaki and a fight above a bullet train are both incredible.) Jackman, who has a lot more veins popping than he did last time, again has a blast in the title role.

The plot involves an old friend of Logan looking for the key to eternal life—a key which Wolverine actually has, making him a mutant of extra purpose and value. Most of the action takes place in Japan, and Wolverine loses his powers for a stretch, so we get the odd sight of him bleeding and getting lethargic.

Mangold and his crew deserve credit for filming two of the world’s most beautiful women: Tao Okamoto and Rila Fukushima. The also-remarkable-looking Famke Janssen makes some dream appearances as Jean Grey—and stay through the credits to get what some might consider to be the film’s best scene.

While I didn’t hate X-Men Origins: Wolverine, I acknowledge this effort is a better movie. Next year’s X-Men: Days of Future Past looks like the stuff of a comic-book-lover’s wet dream, and is sure to give Mr. Jackman another wondrous showcase for those sideburns.

Special Features: The extended edition comes on its own disc and features about 12 more minutes, as well as a commentary by Mangold. You also get the theatrical version, with a nearly one-hour documentary on the film’s making, and an alternate ending. There’s also a short preview for X-Men: Days of Future Past.

Published in DVDs/Home Viewing

Jack the Giant Slayer will go down as one of the worst domestic flops in recent Hollywood history.

Using a budget somewhere in the neighborhood of $200 million, director Bryan Singer—who took a lot of flack for his underperforming Superman Returns (a film I liked)—has put together a visual mess.

The movie features live actors performing along CGI giants, and the live action doesn’t integrate with the effects at all. The effects have a cartoon quality that had me wondering why they didn’t just make this a CGI animated adventure. It’s not like they have huge stars anchoring the picture. Will Smith fought cartoon zombies in I Am Legend, but you forgave the silliness of those cartoon zombies because Smith sold the whole damn thing.

The responsibility of selling Jack rests on the shoulders of the likable but not extremely charismatic Nicholas Hoult (who was very good in Warm Bodies). He plays the title character with enough charm to make the movie almost tolerable, but that’s it. Ewan McGregor and Stanley Tucci have supporting roles, and they actually register more than Hoult.

Unlike in the classic fairytale, Jack must go up against an army of giants. Those giants are created via motion-capture animation that is never convincing or impressive. In fact, the lineup of giant characters looks quite bad.

It doesn’t help matters that the lead giant, a two-headed villain named General Fallon, is voiced by Bill Nighy. Nighy, of course, voiced the Davy Jones in the Pirates of the Caribbean movies, and his work here is very similar. In other words, you’ll spend the movie being constantly reminded of his better performance as a more-interesting villain in another picture. It also doesn’t help that Fallon’s simpleminded second head is a total Gollum rip-off.

The movie is rated PG-13, but don’t take the little kids. Singer inserted many violent moments in which the giants dispatch human victims, often by biting the humans’ screaming heads off. Granted, Singer doesn’t show the bloody aftermath, but it’s pretty shocking for what’s supposed to be a family film.

People get stomped, too, like Charles Grodin in the 1976 version of King Kong, which I just re-watched on Netflix the other day. The ’76 version of Kong was better than Jack the Giant Slayer, because Rick Baker in a monkey suit was more convincing than the CGI giants in Jack. Plus, Jessica Lange was really hot.

As the reluctant princess who runs away from her puny king dad (Ian McShane), relative newcomer Eleanor Tomlinson doesn’t exactly light up the screen. This isn’t necessarily her fault, considering that the screenplay provides her with nothing but flat dialogue, and the wardrobe department makes her wear silly hats.

McGregor fares best and has a couple of good moments, including a sequence in which he almost winds up as a pig in a blanket. Tucci is saddled with a goofy wig and goofy teeth. He looks like he thinks he’s playing somebody funnier—but he isn’t funny.

For the kids, Singer allows for a few farts and boogers. I suppose he thinks that balances it all out: Yes, giants rip heads off screaming victims in this movie quite often, but I will throw in a couple of farts to keep the kids laughing.

I’m curious why Warner Bros. moved this from its original release date last summer. Is it because they wanted to do some more work on the special effects in an effort to make them look better? (If so, they failed.) Or did they know they had a stinker on their hands, so they decided a March release would lessen the competition?

Either way, they have a history-making stinker on their hands.

Up next for Singer is X-Men: Days of Future Past. That’s encouraging news; let’s just hope none of the X-Men fart, pick their nose or bite somebody’s head off.

Jack the Giant Slayer is playing at theaters across the valley.

Published in Reviews