CVIndependent

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Last updateTue, 18 Sep 2018 1pm

Jimmy Boegle

If you’re like me, the recent political and societal climate has got you down.

Well, thank goodness our lovely valley is doing its part to offer plenty of mood-improving distractions.

Every February, art takes center stage in Palm Springs, thanks to the Art Palm Springs fair (which is rapidly growing) and Modernism Week (which already really huge). Not-so-coincidentally, we here at the Independent have a tradition of bringing you a selection of stories every February previewing these awesome events.

In the February print edition (hitting streets this week), and next week at CVIndependent.com, Brian Blueskye will bring you a fantastic article on the Royal Hawaiian Estates. This little Polynesian-themed south Palm Springs complex has a fascinating history—and even more fascinating architecture. It’s also the site of one of Modernism Week’s biggest parties.

Also in the new print edition and online next week, Nicole Borgenicht has two companion pieces that show the local side of Art Palm Springs: She talks to owners of two local galleries about what they have in store for the fair, and two local artists whose work will be on display at the fair.

Modernism Week and Art Palm Springs are just the tip of the figurative iceberg as far as Coachella Valley arts events go. This weekend brings the Southwest Arts Festival to Indio, while March brings the La Quinta Arts Festival. Of course, April is dominated by two weekends of the Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival—you know it simply as Coachella—and one weekend of the country-tinged Stagecoach Festival.

Now … about that aforementioned political and societal climate: Starting tomorrow at CVIndependent.com, the Independent will publish a new regular column by veteran alt-media scribe Baynard Woods. “Democracy in Crisis” will focus its watchful eye on the actions of the Trump administration. And, man, is there a lot to watch.

In the meantime, I hope the Independent continues to inform you, enlighten you and entertain you.

Be sure to grab the aforementioned February 2017 print edition of the Coachella Valley Independent, coming to a location near you (if it’s not already there). As always, thanks for reading, and if you have any questions or feedback, please drop me a line at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

New in Downtown Palm Springs: Moxie Palm Springs

For several years, Grind Brgr Bar languished on the second floor at 262 S. Palm Canyon Drive, in downtown Palm Springs. I went to the Kaiser Restaurant Group-owned restaurant fairly frequently, because the burgers were good, and I loved the view. However, the place seemed constantly understaffed, and there was no vibe whatsoever.

Well, Grind is gone, as is its downstairs sister restaurant, The Chop House. In Grind’s place is Moxie Palm Springs—and it appears the charming second-story space (above what is now the Broken Yolk Café) is finally getting the treatment it deserves.

Don’t go to Moxie expecting a big, honking meal; instead, you’ll find salads, $4 bar bites (such as a single slider or a jicama shrimp taco) and “sharables” such as papas bravas ($8) and a charcuterie platter ($15). On the drink side, Moxie offers an innovative selection of “crafty cocktails” and “classy cocktails” for $11, and well drinks for $6—and you can knock a buck or two off those prices during happy hour, between 4 and 7 p.m.

Just as exciting as the food and drink, however, is the list of special events: A quick gander at Moxie’s Facebook page shows goings-on such as wine-tastings and live entertainment.

Moxie is open at 4 p.m. daily, and closes no later than midnight. For more information, call 760-318-9900, or visit www.facebook.com/moxiepalmsprings.


The Ace Looks to Taco Maria to Spice Up King's Highway Offerings

Forgive me if you’ve heard this before: The Ace Hotel and Swim Club, at 701 E. Palm Canyon Drive, in Palm Springs, has enlisted the aid of a highly regarded out-of-town restaurant to improve the food offerings at the King’s Highway restaurant.

This time, the help is coming from Taco Maria, the Costa Mesa restaurant that’s earned chef Carlos Salgado many awards; in fact, our friends at the OC Weekly have named it the best Orange County restaurant three years in a row.

It was just two years ago that I was telling you that the Ace had brought in Brooklyn, N.Y., restaurant Five Leaves to shore up the King’s Highway menu. Some of those changes were great—the Five Leaves burger was tasty, while the buttermilk fried Jidori earned a coveted Indy Endorsement from the rag you’re reading right now.

Despite these bright points, however, I’ve never really enjoyed eating at King’s Highway all that much—even though I would definitely qualify as an Ace regular. What came out of the kitchen over the last couple of years was inconsistent, while some of the prices were simply outrageous: Chips and salsa will set you back $9 in the Amigo Room. If you want the add “crushed avocado,” your total tab is $15. Really?!

So far, the changes I’ve seen to the menu have been encouraging. I’ll be curious to see what Salgado ultimately does as part of this culinary partnership. (Here’s hoping more-reasonable prices are among the changes!)

Visit www.kingshighwaydiner.com for more information.


In Brief

If you 1) love great food, 2) love great beer, 3) love a gorgeous restaurant atmosphere and 4) are reading this column fairly early, take note: You’ll want to be at the Purple Palm Restaurant, at the Colony Palms Hotel at 572 N. Indian Canyon Drive, in Palm Springs, on Wednesday, Jan. 25, for the Winter Food and Beer Fest. According to this here news release, Purple Palm executive chef Nick Tall “has created a festive dinner of shared plates, all expertly paired with beer” from Coachella Valley Brewing Co. The evening—which starts with a reception at 6 p.m. and is followed by a sit-down dinner—costs $70. Call 760-969-1818 for reservations or more information. … Breakfast is becoming big in down Palm Springs: We recently heard a rumor that a veeeeery popular Palm Desert-area breakfast/brunch joint may be soon moving into the second-story space that The Falls Steakhouse used to call home, at 155 S. Palm Canyon Drive. We have not confirmed the rumor, so we won’t share any further details, but keep your eyes open and your fingers crossed. … Frenchy’s Sports Bar and Grill is now open at 2155 N. Palm Canyon Drive, in north Palm Springs, in the space the late, lamented Dickie O’Neal’s used to call home. Live entertainment and karaoke are in the mix along with the food and sports. Call 760-424-8765, or visit www.facebook.com/FrenchysPalmSprings.

What: The California Split Sandwich

Where: The Lunch Box, 74868 Joni Drive, No. 1a, Palm Desert

How much: $6.95 (plus $2.75 for a cup of soup)

Contact: 760-610-1136; thelunchboxpd.com

Why: This sandwich is satisfying.

Even though I knew I was in the right place, a small part of me wondered if I was being punked when I turned off Cook Street onto Joni Drive in search of The Lunch Box.

All I saw at first were warehouses and industrial buildings—but then I spied the sign above The Lunch Box’s door. Whew. Trust me: You’re unlikely to accidentally stumble upon this highly regarded sandwich joint. But stumble upon it, you should: The sandwiches here are mighty tasty.

I ordered the California Split sandwich—applewood-smoked bacon, melted jack cheese, avocado, tomato, sprouts and mayo on warm sourdough—along with a cup of the soup of the day, creamy chicken and vegetable. (“Think the inside of a chicken pot pie,” as the gentleman behind the counter accurately described it.) Only a few minutes later, my food arrived; I tore off a couple of paper towels from the roll on the table, and dove in.

It was a rainy day—we’ve been having a lot of those lately, yes?—and therefore, this was a perfect lunch. This classic sandwich was warm and flavorful. The bacon was crisp, and the avocado fresh; I swear my palate detected some Italian dressing in there somewhere, too. The sourdough was surprisingly light and fluffy, yet strong enough to keep the sandwich together—although the bread didn’t have to do its job for long, as it was quickly consumed.

This place is all about sandwiches (although several salads and even a hot dog are offered as well), and no one item will set you back more than $6.95. The Lunch Box is a great spot for simple yet well-done lunch fare at good prices—in a most unlikely location.

What: The Pork Adobo Silog Platter (Adobosilog)

Where: Meng’s Filipino Cuisine, 34091 Date Palm Drive, Suite B, Cathedral City

How much: $6.99

Contact: 760-321-2277

Why: It’s a delicious Filipino favorite.

Confession: I have a checkered history when it comes to Filipino restaurants.

A couple of decades ago, I visited a Filipino restaurant in Reno, Nev., for lunch. Various tasty-looking items sat on a steam table; all were unmarked, so I asked the woman behind the counter about some of them. She was fairly friendly until I pointed to a cooked fish of some sort and asked what it was.

She began waving her arms. “No, no! You white boy! That’s not for you!” she proclaimed.

Flash forward to a couple of weeks ago, when I was standing in a hole-in-the-wall Cathedral City Filipino restaurant much like that one in Reno. I admit I was skittish asking about the various items at the steam table—so instead, I ordered one of the “silog platters” depicted on the picture menu on the wall above the counter. (“Silog” is a classic Filipino combination of a meat, garlic rice and eggs.) My choice: The pork adobo.

Thankfully, the people at Meng’s Filipino Cuisine were much nicer than that frantic woman at the place in Reno way back when—and I was excited to dive in when the plate arrived.

The stewed pork was tender, both meaty and fatty (in a good way), and savory with just a hint of sweetness. It was great on its own, but it reached a whole different level when I mixed everything together on the plate. I finished every bit of it, and both my stomach and palate were satisfied. That’s pretty darned fantastic for just $6.99.

A word of warning: The place can be hard to find. Even though Meng’s (also called The Filipino Cuisine on the menu board) has now been around for two-plus years, there’s no sign up for the place yet (!); look for the corner restaurant next to Winchell’s with the Filipino flag in the window.

Trust me: Meng’s is worth finding. It’s the exact opposite of fancy (including plastic utensils and disposable plates)—but the food is delicious.

New: The Coachella Valley Culinary Invitational Takes Place Jan. 13

If you like really good food, want to help out some future chefs, and have at least $179 to spare, you’re going to want to be at the Stergios Building at Desert Regional Medical Center, 1150 N. Indian Canyon Drive, Palm Springs, at 6 p.m., Friday, Jan. 13, for the first Coachella Valley Culinary Invitational.

What is this invitational, you ask? While the Invitational’s website is somewhat confusing, here’s what we’ve figured out: Top chefs from the valley and beyond will be offering various dishes—expect a dozen or so—to be enjoyed at one’s leisure, while fine local band Caxton provides the entertainment, and silent auction items are available for perusal.

And here’s something really cool: Before the event, four chefs will spend time with students at Rancho Mirage High School and La Quinta High School, and those kids will have a role in the dishes presented at the Invitational.

“The Coachella Valley Culinary Invitational … is an event designed to raise funds for a mentorship program for the youth of the valley enrolled in the culinary programs at the local high schools,” the website explains. “It will culminate with a scholarship program. Part of the proceeds will also benefit the chefs’ collaborative local group as it strives to educate the valley’s professional chefs on our responsibility to (develop) sustainable food systems.”

Participating chefs include Dish Creative Cuisine’s Joane Garcia-Colson, and Jimmy Schmidt of Morgan’s in the Desert.

Tickets are $179, or $229 for VIP admission. For more information, visit www.cvcinvitational.com.


Closed: Clementine Gourmet Marketplace and Café

One of Palm Desert’s top-rated restaurants—and one of my personal favorites—is yet another victim of the “summer closure” that turns out to be a permanent closure.

The Clementine Gourmet Marketplace and Café website, as of this writing, enthusiastically says: “Thank you to all of our customers for a great season! Stop in for one last meal with us! We’ll be closed for the summer, starting on June 20.”

Summer came and went … and the spot at 72990 El Paseo never reopened. Now the signs have been removed from the building, and the restaurant’s Facebook page has disappeared.

Efforts to track down the owners, Jennifer and Christophe Douheret, to find out what happened were unsuccessful. If we learn anything, we’ll let you know in this space.


In Brief

Bucatini Trattoria, which has been serving up tasty Italian food at 46660 Washington St. in La Quinta, just opened a Palm Desert location, at 36901 Cook St., Suite 10. Learn more at www.bucatini.biz. … Construction continues on Truss and Twine, from chef Michael Beckman and the rest of the Workshop Bar + Kitchen crew, at 800 N. Palm Canyon Drive, in Palm Springs. Keep your fingers crossed for an opening sometime in the first chunk of 2017. Follow the progress on the Truss and Twine Facebook page. … The signs have been changed, and the former Matchbox Palm Springs is now Brickworks American Bistro + Pizza. Don’t expect a lot of changes beyond the name and those signs, though (and we mean that in a good way). Check things out on the second floor of 155 S. Palm Canyon Drive (overlooking the creepy Sonny Bono statue), in Palm Springs, or head to brickworksbistro.com for more information. … The Omni Rancho Las Palmas Resort and Spa, at 41000 Bob Hope Drive in Rancho Mirage, will host a wine dinner at 6 p.m., Friday, Jan. 13, as part of the Taste of Rancho Dinner series. For $102—that’s $80 plus tax and tip included—you’ll get five courses paired with ONEHOPE Wine, a label which “creates delightful products that inspire people to indulge and do good.” Call 760-862-4518, or visit www.omnihotels.com/hotels/palm-springs-rancho-las-palmas for reservations or more information. … We hear that Fisherman’s Restaurant and Bar, at 70030 Highway 111 in Rancho Mirage, in the old Crab Pot spot, will be opening very, very soon, if it’s not open already. Call 760-321-7635, or visit www.facebook.com/thefishermansranchomirage to learn more. (It has no apparent relation to the other Fisherman’s spots in the area, by the way.) … Mecca is getting its first “nationally branded” (read: chain) sit-down restaurant, in the form of a Denny’s. Ground has been broken at the Mecca Travel Center at 90470 66th Ave.; watch for a mid-2017 opening. … In other chain news: Sonic Drive-In is coming to Indio, at Jefferson Street and Avenue 42. It should be open before all those big April music festivals take place.

When Trio Restaurant’s Sherman Chan walked into the Purple Palm Restaurant at the Colony Palms Hotel to compete in the first Palm Springs Craft Cocktail Championship on Nov. 17, she brought with her a secret weapon: an extensive culinary pedigree, including stints in the kitchens of multiple Michelin-star restaurants.

“I really appreciate cocktails’ flavor aspect,” she said. “It’s not just about booze; it’s about aromatics, everything.

Chan, 29, was born in Hong Kong, and has lived most of her life in big cities—Toronto, New York and the like. She’s always been intrigued by food, and was all set to study at the prestigious Le Cordon Bleu in Paris, she said. However, before she left, she was challenged by her mother to work in a kitchen for a month to make sure she enjoyed it.

“I was working with an old-school chef, and he said that I didn’t need culinary school; he’d teach me,” she said.

Chan wound up working at some of the world’s most renowned restaurants: L’atelier de Joel Robuchon (three Michelin stars); Caprice in Hong Kong (two Michelin stars); and the Restaurant at Meadowood in Napa Valley (three Michelin stars).

She came to the Coachella Valley in January 2012 to take a temporary job at the Parker Palm Springs, because the Restaurant at Meadowood was going through a month-long closure.

“I didn’t want to be on unemployment for a month,” she said.

She was only planning on staying for three months—in fact, she had her next job lined up in San Francisco. However, she became smitten with the desert.

“I love the weather, and it’s waaaaay cheaper to live here,” Chan laughed. “It’s a great place to live.”

She helped open the late, lamented Jiao, where she was a consultant and sous chef. Shortly thereafter, she started hankering for a chance to be in the front of the house, and she decided to take a job tending bar at Palm Desert Country Club.

“I thought I might as well start working the front of the house and see how it was,” Chan said, adding that the money is often better in the front. She actually started the process of moving behind the bar while she was in Napa, taking an online course from BarSmarts.

After Jiao, Chan spent time at a variety of well-respected local restaurants, in both the kitchen and at the bar—Escena, Tonga Hut, the Westin Mission Hills, Gyoro Gyoro Izakaya Japonaise, So.Pa at L’Horizon and Mastro’s Steakhouse.

In December 2015, she started working part-time at Trio. Turns out she’d found a home: The fun energy at Trio, she said, made her eventually quit another part-time job to work full-time there.

“In hospitality, it’s really easy to work in a lot of places where you don’t feel like you belong,” Chan said. “I am so happy I got the opportunity to work here. Plus, the business is expanding, and they treat the staff really well.”

At Trio, she’s added a lot of variety and nuance to the cocktail menu. She brought the Palm Springs Craft Cocktail Championship trophy to Trio with her “Bulleit Proof” drink, a combination of Bulleit Bourbon, grapefruit juice, honey syrup, lime, Peychaud’s bitters, ginger beer and rosemary.

“I really enjoy the whole bartending thing,” she said. “I get to create something and have guest interaction. It’s fun being a conductor of someone’s evening.”

Trio Restaurant is located at 707 N. Palm Canyon Drive, in Palm Springs. For more information, call 760-864-8746, or visit triopalmsprings.com.

I have always been blessed with the ability to see and understand both sides of various issues. One can select almost any hot-button topic, and I’ll be able to empathize with people who take each position—even if I disagree.

However, I am completely baffled by the modern-day “conservative” movement in the United States.

If someone believes in a smaller, less-intrusive government—traditionally a conservative value—I get it, even if I don’t agree with it. Meanwhile, if someone thinks the government should play a role in legislating do’s and don’ts when it comes to “moral” issues—like, say, LGBT rights or a woman’s right to choose—I can understand where that person’s coming from (even if I strongly disagree … and I most likely do).

I get lost and confused, however, when these two rather contradictory beliefs are melded together, as they are by a lot of so-called conservatives today. If you think the government should play a role in determining which couples can get a marriage license, and which ones can’t, yet you believe the government shouldn’t play a role in determining how far a company can go in terms of pollution and environmental damage—frankly, I think you’re intellectually dishonest.

This brings me to the story, published online last week, that serves as our January print-edition cover story.

I’ve had many discussions over the years with friend and regular Independent contributor Kevin Fitzgerald about his mother-in-law, Annette. She’d been battling cancer for many years, and had reached the point where she had mere months to live out a rather painful existence. This summer, she decided to look into California’s new End of Life Option Act—often referred to as the assisted-suicide law.

Click here to Kevin’s story about what happened from that point on. I guarantee you’ll find the piece to be both informational—and incredibly moving.

One of the issues Kevin touches upon is the fact that here in the Coachella Valley, it’s rather difficult for a dying individual to find assistance from the medical community when it comes to the End of Life Option Act: Not one of the three major hospitals participates in the law, and many of the valley’s doctors are prohibited from helping patients with the law by their employers.

Why? Kevin’s piece doesn’t address this question; watch the Independent for further coverage in the upcoming weeks and months. However I do know that opposition by some “conservatives” has played a role.

And you know what? I just don’t get it.

Happy New Year, and as always, thanks for reading. Oh, and be sure to pick up the January print edition, hitting newsstands this week.

What: The Baked Eggs in “Purgatorio”

Where: Joey Palm Springs, 245 S. Palm Canyon Drive, Palm Springs

How much: $9.50

Contact: 760-320-8370; www.facebook.com/joeypalmsprings

Why: It’s a perfect breakfast on a cool morning.

Amazing food can often be found in the most unexpected places—and Joey Palm Springs is a perfect example.

I met my friend Michael for coffee there one recent morning. I already knew that the space is beyond charming—it used to house the late, lamented Espresso Cielo—so I expected to enjoy a fine cup o’ joe in a nice spot with a good friend.

I was also feeling a bit peckish, so I decided to peruse Joey’s food offerings. At the top of the breakfast menu was a dish called baked eggs in “Purgatorio”: two eggs baked in soft polenta, marinara, Parmigiano-Reggiano and basil. Wow, I thought. I didn’t expect to find a dish like this in a li’l café like this!

Turns out I probably should have had higher expectations: Joey Palm Springs is owned and operated by Vince Calcagno and Joe Lucero—and this couple has a fine food pedigree: Calcagno used to own Zuni Café, widely regarded as one of San Francisco’s top restaurants.

While all of this sounds good on paper, the food was great in actuality. Cheese, polenta, marinara and egg are a classic combination for a reason, and while Joey Palm Springs’ version of this well-known dish—usually called “eggs in purgatory”—wasn’t at all unique, it was perfectly executed.

The baked eggs in “Purgatorio” dish was made even better by the weather—it was a chilly morning, something that’s rather common this time of year in our lovely bit o’ desert. Well, this little treat warmed me right up—and elated my taste buds at the same time. It was indeed an unexpected and most welcome find.

What: The Alps Wienerschnitzel Sandwich

Where: Alps Village, 77734 Country Club Drive, Palm Desert

How much: $13

Contact: 760-200-5400

Why: I keep thinking of the sandwich, days after eating it.

Alps Village opened around the start of 2016, a fact that somehow did not make it onto my radar screen. A friend mentioned the place in passing, and since I love German food—when it’s done right, that is—I decided to check it out. I am happy I did—but disappointed that I missed out on this lovely little spot for the better part of a year.

There were only a couple of other tables occupied on my recent weekday lunch visit. The menu includes German and Mediterranean fare—including Italian-style pastas, pizzas and various salads—but I focused in on the Germanic fare. I seriously debated trying the goulash or the stuffed cabbage rolls, but instead decided on the Alps pork wienerschnitzel sandwich. (Chicken is also available, as is veal for an extra $2.)

After devouring my appetizer, a soft pretzel with a simply amazing kajmak spread—a homemade cheese spread with a stronger flavor and the consistency of whipped cream cheese—my sandwich arrived. It was not on my plate for long—as it was swiftly devoured.

The breaded pork cutlet was delicious and moist. The “Alpskraut” added tartness and a lot of flavor without overwhelming the pork. The pink-orange “house sauce” provided a nice hint of sweetness. All of it together on the rye bread was near perfection: Had there been any more sauerkraut or sauce, the flavors would have been thrown off balance; any less, and the sandwich would have been too dry.

As of this writing, it’s been several days since I had the sandwich, and I keep thinking about it. It was that good.

When the members of the Palm Springs Gay Men’s Chorus take the stage this weekend for their two Hollywood Holiday—Christmas at the Movies concerts, they’ll be without one of their most prominent and beloved colleagues.

David Murdock, a singer who had also done everything from sound to public relations for the chorus over the last half-decade, died suddenly on Oct. 17. Murdock was also an active member of the Palm Springs Leather Order of the Desert, and was a key organizer of Palm Springs Leather Pride. He’d spent much of his life working in the entertainment and technology industries. Countless people—myself included—considered David a friend.

The chorus performed at Murdock’s memorial service at the Palm Springs Pavilion on Dec. 4, and this weekend, the PSGMC is dedicating its performance of “The Prayer”—a song from the film Quest for Camelot popularized by Celine Dion and Andrea Bocelli—to Murdock.

“I can’t even describe all that Dave did for the chorus,” said Douglas Wilson, the PSGMC artistic director. “We joined the chorus at the same time, but I didn’t know that until later, because he had jumped in and was doing everything.”

Hollywood Holiday is the first of the chorus’ three featured concerts this season—and the chorus’ first in its new home, the newly upgraded Richards Center for the Arts, formerly known as the Palm Springs High School Auditorium.

“It’s a beautiful place to be,” said Wilson, who is in his fourth year as the chorus’ artistic director.

As one can guess from the title, Hollywood Holiday features Christmas songs from various movies. Giving the holiday concert such a focus, Wilson said, helped the chorus overcome some of the normal difficulties in creating a Christmas program—new versus traditional, religious versus nonreligious, and so on.

“It is a difficult program to balance out,” Wilson said. “This year, with the idea of movies, it really made it easier to do.”

However, the focus created another difficulty—finding arrangements of not-as-well-known songs for men’s choruses. Wilson said he overcame this obstacle by tapping into the network of other gay men’s choruses—and, in some cases, arranging the songs himself.

As one example of a lesser-known but nonetheless excellent song in the show, Wilson mentioned “Cold Enough to Snow,” from Life With Mikey, a 1993 comedy starring Michael J. Fox—with a dismal 20 percent positive rating on RottenTomatoes.com.

“It’s not a very good movie, but it has a beautiful song,” Wilson said.

Wilson mentioned another song about which he’s excited: “Sparklejollytwinklejingley,” from the Broadway production of Elf: The Musical. While “Sparklejollytwinklejingley” is not from a movie, it is from a musical based on a movie.

“We’re kind of stretching it here,” Wilson laughed. Close enough.

Wilson promised that attendees will love the mix of songs, some of which are from beloved films including The Polar Express, A Charlie Brown Christmas and Meet Me in St. Louis.

The concert may also be a little more emotional than usual, given Dave Murdock’s absence. Wilson mentioned the large reaction he received from the chorus’ members after they were sent a message letting them know about Murdock’s passing.

“What really surprised me was how many people who were new to the chorus—only members for a few weeks, really—who responded, ‘Dave was one of the first people to say hello to me,’ or, ‘Dave helped me.’ He was the epitome of what we want to be as a chorus,” Wilson said.

Hollywood Holiday: Christmas at the Movies will be performed at 8 p.m., Saturday, Dec. 17; and 3 p.m., Sunday, Dec. 18, at the Richards Center for the Arts (formerly known as the Palm Springs High School Auditorium), 2401 E. Baristo Road, in Palm Springs. Tickets are $25-$50. For tickets or more information, call 760-219-2077, or visit www.psgmc.com.