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08 Nov 2013

Style Yes, Plot No: The Guerilla Filming of 'Escape From Tomorrow' Is More Interesting Than the Film's Story

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Jack Dalton in Escape From Tomorrow. Jack Dalton in Escape From Tomorrow.

Writer-director Randy Moore took a film crew and performers into multiple Disney parks and managed to film a fairly cohesive movie—without permission, and without getting caught.

In Escape From Tomorrow, Jim (Roy Abramsohn) finds out that he has lost his job during the movie’s opening scene. Rather than tell his wife (Elena Schuber), he takes his family on one last day of park-hopping that includes the It’s a Small World ride, monorail trips and Epcot Center. Jim notices people coughing as he enters the park—as well as two French teens who seem strangely interested in him. Hallucinations, blackouts and eventual health issues ensue, leading to sequences that make no sense and an ending that is just strange.

I couldn’t help but be impressed by the scenes shot in the actual parks. Some green-screen shots are obvious, but Moore and his crew managed to get other usable shots using the video functions in standard digital cameras. In this way, the movie is a marvel.

As for the plotting, it suffers a bit from this guerilla-filming format and has a lot of holes and inconsistencies.

The way the movie was made is far more interesting than the movie itself. 

Escape From Tomorrow opens Friday, Nov. 8, at the Cinemas Palme d’Or (72840 Highway 111, Palm Desert; 760-779-0730).

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