CVIndependent

Fri07032020

Last updateMon, 20 Apr 2020 1pm

Our big April Music Issue will start hitting newsstands next week—and to celebrate, we're releasing April's Coachella-themed FRESH Sessions mix a bit early!

The Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival has been around since 1999, and has grown—massively—ever since. This year’s lineup features a diverse collection of performers from all over the world. To celebrate the festival, for this month’s FRESH Sessions, I've compiled a set of tracks that includes some music by up-and-coming artists at the festival, as well as songs by some more well-known acts.

I like Coachella because it showcases a wide variety of performers and genres. Everything from indie rock to trance is represented under various tents, all with an atmosphere that is electric. While the festival has lost a bit of its local element, unfortunately, it still seems to carry a strong sense of culture and creativity.

As for my appearances in April: Watch my Facebook page (www.facebook.com/ansofficial) for an updated list of gigs—but make sure you don’t miss the Pre-Coachella Warehouse Party, at Coachella Valley Brewing Co. (30640 Gunther St., Thousand Palms), starting at 3 p.m., Saturday, April 5. Tickets are $35, and that includes four CV Brewing Co. beers, lots of music, live art and tons more. Get your tickets now at brownpapertickets.com!

In the meantime, here’s the April FRESH Sessions. Enjoy—and watch out for a surprise!

  • Chromeo featuring Toro Y Moi, “Come Alive”
  • Duck Sauce, “Barbara Streisand”
  • Anna Lunoe and Touch Sensitive, “Real Talk”
  • Flight Facilities featuring Elizabeth Rose, “I Didn't Believe”
  • Chromeo, “Bonafied Lovin’”
  • DJ Topsider, “Mast (Yale x Classixx)”
  • Anna Lunoe “Up and Down”
  • Alf Alpha x All Night Shoes, “Deep End”
  • Justin Timberlake, “Suit and Tie” (Aeroplane Remix)
  • Flume featuring Chet Faker, “Left Alone”
Published in Subatomic

The Coen Brothers have made films raging from dark-comedy works to Westerns—yet they all have a distinctive, specific Coen Brothers feel. Their latest, Inside Llewyn Davis, is loosely based on Dave Von Ronk, a Greenwich Village folk singer who tried—and failed—to captivate audiences in the early ‘60s.

The story begins in a café. After performing, Llewyn Davis (Oscar Isaac) is told by the owner that a “friend” is waiting for him outside. When he steps outside, he’s beaten up by a stranger. The struggling musician—his new record isn’t selling—sleeps on the couches of his friends, and he’s trying to come to terms with the suicide of a former collaborator and friend. He ponders returning to the Merchant Marines.

Inside Llewyn Davis has some of the dark humor typical in a Coen Brothers film, and the comedy relief is always perfectly timed to break the moments of intense heartbreak you feel for the struggling Llewyn.

The musical performances also make the film worthwhile. Isaac’s work is fantastic. (He performs solo and as a trio with Justin Timberlake and Adam Driver.) Other music performances come from the likes of Nancy Blake and Declan Bennett. The soundtrack for Inside Llewyn Davis is indeed worth remembering.

The Coen Brothers can do no wrong, it seems, when it comes to making good films that separate themselves from previous efforts. There is no doubt that this one is going to bring home some awards; in fact, the nominations have already been pouring in. 

Inside Llewyn Davis is now playing at the Camelot Theatres (2300 E. Baristo Road, Palm Springs; 760-325-6565) and the Cinémas Palme d’Or (72840 Highway 111, Palm Desert; 760-779-0430).

Published in Reviews

Was the world aching for a movie about online gambling? If so, was it aching for a movie about online gambling in which Justin Timberlake gets beaten up a lot while looking really scared? Was it aching for a film in which Ben Affleck feeds poultry to his pet crocodiles?

In Runner Runner, Timberlake plays Richie, a college student paying his tuition through online gambling. After possibly getting hustled, he travels to Costa Rica to get in the face of the guy in charge of the gambling site (Affleck). Richie winds up getting a job and thrusting himself into a seedy online gambling underworld that involves running around a lot and acting really confused.

Timberlake is an actor who can look really good—or really, really lost. This time, he’s lost. As for Affleck, I kind of like him in this movie; it’s fun when he plays a bad guy.

Sadly, the movie lets him down in a big way with its silly subplots and failed attempts at being clever.

Runner Runner is now playing at theaters across the valley.

Published in Reviews