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04 Oct 2016

An All-American Success Story: Steve Grand Headlines at the Center Stage Gala

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Steve Grand. Steve Grand.

In 2013, Steve Grand maxed out his finances to make a video for his song “All-American Boy.”

He uploaded it to YouTube—and the rest, as they say, is history.

Grand will perform at Center Stage, a benefit for the LGBT Community Center of the Desert, on Friday, Oct. 28, at the Riviera Resort and Spa.

During a recent phone interview, he discussed what he originally planned to do with “All-American Boy.” (Scroll down to watch the video.)

“I had something very specific in mind that I wanted to accomplish,” Grand said. “I wanted to tell a story of love between two men. I wanted the backdrop of it to be very earthy, traditional, American and safe. I also wanted to contrast that with the idea that people have or had in their heads that homosexuality is something that wasn’t part of the American dream. I wanted to bring that to light with art in a compelling way.”

Grand has been mislabeled as the first gay mainstream country artist. For one thing, Grand was not the first—and he doesn’t label himself as a country artist.

“I don’t spend time thinking about that, because the reality is that I am a singer. I’m also a gay man, and I just do what I do,” Grand said. “People call it whatever they want to call it. It’s something I really try to micromanage. There are a lot of things I don’t have control over. … I never said I was a country artist and never wanted to be labeled as one. People heard my song and heard whatever they heard, and it got picked up by the media. Even though I ask not to be, I’m still pegged as a country artist.

“As far as the LGBT thing goes, I’m proud to be part of the LGBT community, and I’m a proud gay man. It’s an important part of my life. It was something I knew from a young age and tried to fight it because it was against the world I grew up in. It became an important part of my identity, because it’s something I had to fight for.”

Grand said all people can relate to his music.

“One of the things I stand for the most as an artist is to show people that no matter what your sexual orientation or gender is, where you come from, or your skin color, we experience things as humans,” he said. “We begin to lose our humanity when we box people off. … We need to focus on our common bonds like love and loss. These are human experiences that apply to every group.”

Grand said he’s proud of all he’s accomplished thus far in his young life.

“I didn’t really have the help that (some) people have when they’re first starting, and I think that now with all I know, if I was back in 2013, I would have handled the aftermath of that differently,” he said. “I am proud that I was a 23-year-old young man with no experience in this—with just heart and passion and a work ethic—who was able to create something from very little. I draw back from that when I’m at low points and remind myself that I created all of this from something that was conceived in my head, and I brought it to life with my talents and by reaching out to people who thought I’d do a good job. I’m also really proud that my Kickstarter campaign to finance my first album raised over $300,000.”

Grand is always working to make himself a better musician, he said.

“I am staying busier than ever, even though I’m kind of leaving smaller imprints on the Internet world than I have in the past,” he said. “It’s all work behind the scenes right now and staying busy every day and working on transforming my live show now that I’ve gotten to know my audience so much better. I want to be a more versatile live performer. … I want to build a live show that reflects more of my musical talents. I’m working on my next record, with a couple of side projects keeping me busy. I work all day pretty much every day.”

Looking back, Grand said there is one moment as a live performer he will never forget.

“The one that comes to mind is when I first played Market Days in 2013,” he said, referring to the iconic LGBT street festival in Chicago. “My video had just come out a month before and was still very fresh. There were so many people—the most people I had ever been in front of, and I saw so many people with their cameras up. Not even a month before, I was playing to the most empty room at the place I used to play at in Chicago, for $100 a night for two hours. Now all these people were there, and I had this captive audience who was there to see me. … That was a special moment for me. I felt very powerful and triumphant. ”

Steve Grand will perform at the Seventh Annual Center Stage, a benefit for the LGBT Community Center of the Desert; comedian Kate Clinton is the host. The event starts at 5:30 p.m., Friday, Oct. 28, at the Riviera Resort and Spa, 1600 N. Indian Canyon Drive, in Palm Springs. Tickets start at $195. For tickets or more information, call 760-416-7790, or visit thecenterps.org.

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