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If you’re a data geek like I am, you can have a lot of fun with Pollstar magazine’s annual list of the Top 200 theater venues in the world.

For example: The Coachella Valley’s McCallum Theatre—considered a small- to medium-sized venue—in 2018 came in at No. 70 in the entire world, with well more than 100,000 tickets sold. No theater in Southern California sold more tickets than the McCallum did, even though the venue is only open for half the year.

That’s right: The McCallum had more butts in its seats in 2018 than any theater in Los Angeles, the second-largest city in the country.

Mitch Gershenfeld, the McCallum’s president, CEO and show-booker, said 2019 has been even stronger—and that he has high hopes for the 2019-2020 season. Tickets for all shows in the upcoming season go on sale online today (April 11) at 6 p.m., with box-office and phone sales beginning tomorrow morning at 9 a.m.

The 2019-2020 season includes the big names—Melissa Etheridge (Nov. 14), anyone?—that people have come to expect to be on the McCallum schedule, along with valley favorites like the Ten Tenors (Feb. 19-23, 2020) and Pink Martini (March 4-8). However, Gershenfeld said he’s particularly thrilled about the Broadway shows he’s booked; five of them have never been to the McCallum before, kicking off with the musical adaptation of A Christmas Story (Nov. 26 and 27).

“It has all of the key things that are in the movie,” Gershenfeld said. “There’s a whole number with dancing leg lamps.”

That will be followed by Waitress (Dec. 6-8) and The Play That Goes Wrong (Jan. 21 and 22), a critical darling that just closed on Broadway earlier this year—and is still going strong on London’s West End.

“It’s the quintessential British farce,” Gershenfeld said.

Escape to Margaritaville (Jan. 30-Feb. 1)—a musical featuring the songs of Jimmy Buffett, but you probably figured that out already—will be followed by Beautiful: The Carole King Musical (Feb. 7-9), which has become a Broadway fixture, recently celebrating its fifth anniversary there.

“It’s really nice to get another musical that’s still on Broadway,” Gershenfeld said.

Those new-to-the-McCallum shows will be joined by returnees Chicago (March 13-15) and The Illusionists (April 7 and 8).

Mitch’s Picks—a series of a shows by unheralded performers that Gershenfeld personally recommends—are back, starting off on Nov. 22 with a double-bill of performers who perform traditional Latin music with a twist: the all-women Mariachi Flor de Toloache and The Villalobos Brothers. They’ll be followed by a Christmas show on Dec. 16 by YouTube a cappella sensation Voctave.

“They’re an amazing group who primarily performs at Disneyworld,” Gershenfeld said. “The core members have beautiful voices, and the arrangements are extraordinary.”

Other Mitch’s Picks include the Derina Harvey Band, a Celtic-rock group (Jan. 14); Wicked alum-turned-soul singer Shoshana Bean (Feb. 4); and Mnozil Brass (March 24), a brass septet that melds original tunes, classics and a lot of humor.

The National Geographic Live series will be back at the McCallum for a second year with three shows. Gershenfeld admits he was concerned about how a science series would do—and he was pleasantly surprised by the reaction of McCallum audiences this year.

“They love it, and they point out that it’s so different,” Gershenfeld said. “It’s also a program that attracts children, which is great. During the Q&A sessions, the kids are always asking questions.”

This year’s shows are On the Trail of Big Cats (Jan. 6), Photography Without Borders (March 2) and View From Above (April 5) with astronaut Terry Virts.

Gershenfeld said the new season’s highlights include some tribute shows that are quite special. First and foremost is A Toast to Steve Lawrence and Eydie Gormé (April 4). The two were most successful act to regularly appear at the McCallum before the Ten Tenors came along, Gershenfeld said.

“Frank Sinatra would show up to hang out backstage,” he added.

Gormé passed away in 2013, and Lawrence has retired from performing; this show will feature their son, David Lawrence, and Tony Award-winner Debbie Gravitte, along with a 32-piece orchestra and vintage video clips.

“We have all of their original music charts,” Gershenfeld said. “… This is the first place this show is going to play. There’s no place (Steve Lawrence) would want to do the first show other than (here).”

Speaking of Frank Sinatra … he’ll be returning to the McCallum, sort of, thanks to the talents of Bob Anderson, on Feb. 14 and 15. Gershenfeld explained that the Sinatra impressionist sounds exactly like Ol’ Blue Eyes, and to add to the impression, he has a prosthetic mask of Sinatra’s face. When you add in a 32-piece orchestra playing Sinatra’s original arrangements … the likeness is eerie and amazing.

The other big names coming to the McCallum zigzag across genres—Mandy Patinkin (Nov. 16), The Beach Boys (Dec. 1), Itzhak Perlman (Jan. 20), Ricky Skaggs (March 12), the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater (March 15), and so on.

“Last season (2017-2018) was the most successful in our history,” Gershenfeld said. “This year (the just-concluding 2018-2019) surpassed it.” And 2019-2020 has a great chance of continuing that trend.

Tickets for the McCallum Theatre’s 2019-2020 season go on sale online at mccallumtheatre.com at 6 p.m., Thursday, April 11; and at 9 a.m., Friday, April 12, at the box office, 73000 Fred Waring Drive, and by phone, at 760-340-2787. For the complete schedule, visit www.mccallumtheatre.com.

Published in Local Fun

When the band Chicago released its second album, commonly referred to as II, in 1970, it pushed the group’s blend of rock, jazz and classical into even greater territory.

Chicago is currently touring behind a remastered release of II, and at some stops is playing the album in its entirety. The group will perform at Fantasy Springs Resort Casino on Saturday, Oct. 6.

The first album, Chicago Transit Authority, released the year before, challenged radio formats with songs longer than the typical-for-singles three minutes. “Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?” clocks in at 4 1/2 minutes, while “Questions 67 and 68” goes beyond 5—yet they became hit singles. This continued with II; “25 or 6 to 4” is almost 5 minutes long.

Chicago not only survived the death of guitarist Terry Kath in 1978 and the departure of singer, songwriter and bassist Peter Cetera in 1985; the band kept on going, earning induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2016. After the recent departure of another founding member, Walter Parazaider, due to a heart condition, three founding members remain. One of them, trumpet-player Lee Loughnane, said during a recent phone interview he’s unsure whether the band will perform II in its entirety at the Fantasy Springs, although it’s been a lot of fun to do.

“We often talked about doing it, but this is the first time we actually decided to go ahead and do it,” Loughnane said. “The reason is because (in 2016), Rhino Records hired a guy from England named Steven Wilson to remix it. That started spurring interest in the second album, and we were nominated for the Grammy Hall of Fame, and we wanted to continue that resurgence and play it in its entirety on the road. We’ve been doing that all year, and it’s been a lot of fun. When we started doing it, we wondered how people that young could come up with that intricate musical style. I don’t hear any songs like that anywhere else, and it’s unique to us. It’s been a lot of fun to re-create them.”

Loughnane said he and the other original band members had already played most of II at single shows before.

“We’ve played every song except for ‘Memories of Love’ live, because at that point, we only had two albums, and it was all we knew. We played everything that we knew at the time,” he said. “Until we got enough hits and people would say, ‘Well, how come you’re doing that and not the hits?’—that’s when we stopped doing what people always called ‘album cuts.’”

In 2016, a documentary on Chicago was released titled Now More Than Ever: The History of Chicago. It was an honest look into the band’s high times (no pun intended … mostly) and low times. The members discuss the period when they worked with producer David Foster, who made Cetera the face of the band and reduced the amount of horns in the music.

“He was hired to put us back on the map. … He took the reins, and that’s what he came up with: He used less horns,” Loughnane said. “He did make sure some horn parts got into the songs, but he didn’t concentrate too much on them. That got me playing different instruments, and I played bass sometimes when we’d play those songs live. He got us to do different things with our talents, and in retrospect, many of those songs still work for us every night. He did admit in the documentary that maybe he overproduced and maybe changed our style to a drastic point where it was a departure from what we did before. But when you look at it now, it’s almost as if we’ve had two different careers, and they’ve worked. We’re combining them when we play live every night.”

Chicago has released a string of live recordings from recent shows.

“It’s sort of a document of what we’re doing at the time. Unfortunately, the band has changed so many times in the past couple of years,” he said. “Now, it’s to the point where it’d be nice to have a studio album of the current band, because it’s so much fun to play together. But we’ll see what happens. It’s harder and harder to come up with albums that will be played for enough people to hear them to where it’ll make sense for us.”

Chicago’s live shows are definitely a spectacle; you can feel how difficult many of the songs are and how many different times the key changes. Loughnane laughed when I brought this up.

“Our songs are interesting. They are difficult to play, and you have to keep your chops together to pull it off. ‘Ballet for a Girl in Buchannon’ is probably the most intricate song that we do, as well as ‘Introduction.’ There are so many styles in each of those songs—different tempo changes, different keys and a lot of different factors. They never get any easier, and it’s always fun to play them.”

The members of Chicago understand that music has changed—and that what they do is not seen much anymore. But Loughnane said he doesn’t fear the future.

“Unless they listen to oldies radio where you’d hear us more often, it’s hard to hear music that incorporates brass and strings, as well as other instruments. Now it’s all vocals and drum machines,” he said. “I’m not afraid that it’s going to completely go away, because music is going to survive, and the writers will figure out a way to bring back other instruments into the fold.”

Chicago will perform at 8 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 6, at Fantasy Springs Resort Casino, 84245 Indio Springs Parkway, in Indio. Tickets are $59 to $99. For tickets or more information, call 760-342-5000, or visit www.fantasyspringsresort.com.

Published in Previews

Peter Cetera left the band Chicago in the summer of 1985 to embark on a full-time solo career—and success followed him.

A year after leaving Chicago, his song “Glory of Love” became a No. 1 hit after appearing on The Karate Kid Part II soundtrack—and the success did not stop there.

Cetera will be stopping by Spotlight 29 on Saturday, Feb. 18.

In 2016, Chicago was finally inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Many Chicago fans hoped there would be a reunion for at least one evening at the ceremony—but Cetera and the band could not agree to terms, and it didn’t happen.

Cetera said he doesn’t have a formula when it comes to writing successful songs.

“I wish I had a formula for success,” Cetera said, “because I’d be more successful than I am now if I had one. I don’t really know. I love what I do, and I think I write from the heart, and I think people can feel that.”

Cetera has produced eight of his own albums. Fun fact: He also produced an album for ABBA member Agnetha Faltskog.

“Back during the ‘Glory of Love’ era, I went over to Europe, doing some TV shows,” Cetera explained. “I was in Sweden and performed for the queen’s jubilee. That’s where I met a guy from a record company over there who introduced me to Agnetha Faltskog. He called me up later and was curious if I would consider producing her next album. I said, ‘Yeah, let’s go!’ It was a lot of fun. I went over there, and we got the material together and brought her over to the States to record. That was the last time I could get her back here, because she has a fear of flying.”

While Cetera was older than most of the artists being shown on MTV in the 1980s, he found a lot of success, both with Chicago and as a solo artist, thanks to the music video. Looking back, however, Cetera said he isn’t a fan.

“I hated it, to be perfectly honest,” he said. “I think it’s been proven: Little by little, it takes away from the music itself and puts more emphasis on theatrics. I think what you see now in music is exactly that: It’s based on how many dancers and what kind of moves you have onstage rather than paying attention to the music.

“Toward the end, we made some fun videos, and they were great. But basically, it was kind of a pain. It probably helped sales, I would say. The MTV thing kind of lost its way, and it was good while it lasted.”

Cetera, like his former bandmates, thought he would never see Chicago inducted into the Hall of Fame.

“I knew somewhere in the bowels of their very evil hearts, there was some kind of vendetta keeping us out,” he said. “I thought that would continue, and it did continue for years. It wasn’t until they saw a loss of interest in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. They had to get some interest back into it. They decided to have this open fan vote, and when they did, we won by an overwhelming majority. It kind of proved a point, I think.”

Cetera talked about the two Chicago albums he thought were the most important.

“The very first album is obviously groundbreaking and brought us to the forefront in music,” he said. “I think Chicago 17 was very important, because it brought us back to the top.”

Surprisingly, Cetera said he’s not a fan of classical music or jazz music—even though Chicago incorporated elements of each into its sound.

“I was never a jazz or classical person—I wanted to rock ’n’ roll,” he said. “I am still not a jazz person or a classical person. I respect that music, but I don’t play it. I was sort of forced into playing that, and it wasn’t my forte. I never really cared for it.”

If you’re hoping for new material from Cetera anytime soon … prepare for disappointment.

“I’m working on absolutely nothing,” he said. “I’ve done more concerts this (past) year than I have in years. I’ve been busy doing that. When I get through with this, we’ll see.”

Peter Cetera will perform at 8 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 18, at Spotlight 29, 46200 Harrison Place, in Coachella. Tickets are $45 to $65. For tickets or more information, call 760-775-5566, or visit www.spotlight29.com.

Published in Previews

February is upon us—which means it’s time for Valentine’s Day. In other words, the month is bringing some great romance-tinged events—as well as shows for those who might not be in the romantic mood.

The McCallum Theatre’s schedule is packed with so many great events in February that it’s hard to choose which ones to mention—so be sure to peruse the McCallum website for the full schedule. At 8 p.m., Monday, Feb. 6, the son of the legendary Mel Torme, Steve March Torme, will be performing his “Torme Sings Torme” show. He’ll be accompanied by a 10-piece band as he performs his father’s best-known material. Tickets are $27 to $77. At 8 p.m., Monday, Feb. 13, country music hit-maker Phil Vassar will be performing. Vassar has 10 No. 1 singles and 26 Top 40 hits under his belt. That’s impressive! This is a great show to put you in the mood for Stagecoach, which is coming up in April. Tickets are $27 to $67. If you’re not in the country mood, it’s OK, because at 8 p.m., Wednesday, Feb. 15, classical trio Simply Three will be performing. The YouTube sensation has gained more than 10 million views and is well-known for a repertoire of covers from Puccini to Coldplay. Tickets are $27 to $57. McCallum Theatre, 73000 Fred Waring Drive, Palm Desert; 760-340-2787; www.mccallumtheatre.com.

Agua Caliente Casino Resort Spa has some big events in February. Really big. At 9 p.m., Friday, Feb. 10, Air Supply will be returning to rock your faces. OK, just kidding. The duo of Graham Russell and Russell Hitchcock is a soft-rock outfit that has sold millions of records. I guess this show could be a nice surprise for someone special in your life as an early Valentine’s Day gift. Just make sure that someone special likes soft rock … or else there could be consequences. Tickets are $40 to $60. At 8 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 11, Sting will be stopping by, which is kind of a big deal. The Police was one of the bands that defined music in the ’80s. Since Sting went solo, he’s become just as big as The Police were—if not bigger. Fun suggestion: Watch Andy Summers’ documentary Can’t Stand Losing You, which was filmed during The Police’s reunion tour and also shows older footage of the band. You’ll learn Sting is kind of a jerk. Tickets are $95 to $200. The Show at Agua Caliente Casino Resort Spa, 32250 Bob Hope Drive, Rancho Mirage; 888-999-1995; www.hotwatercasino.com.

Fantasy Springs Resort Casino has some heavy hitters coming—so many, in fact, that I don’t have space to talk about them all. At 8 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 4, Chicago will be returning to Fantasy Springs. You really won’t fully understand Chicago until you see them live: I was absolutely blown away by them back in July. Tickets are $39 to $79. Remember the ’90s? Well, at 8 p.m., Friday, Feb. 10, get a double-dose of the ’90s with Sugar Ray and Smash Mouth. These bands are often the butt of jokes—but looking back, I have to laugh. Sugar Ray actually had more than 15 minutes of fame, and frontman Mark McGrath had punk credentials before Sugar Ray became a pop band. Smash Mouth, on the other hand, has been embarrassed after some recent fan-filmed performances—with the band melting down onstage—went viral. Still, both bands had enough popular songs to warrant greatest-hits albums. Tickets are $29 to $59. At 8 p.m., Friday, Feb. 24, R&B superstar Mary J. Blige (upper right) will be performing. She’s been charting hits since 1994 and has done duets with the late George Michael, Bono, Barbra Streisand and many others. Tickets are $59 to $129. Fantasy Springs Resort Casino, 84245 Indio Springs Parkway, Indio; 760-342-5000; www.fantasyspringsresort.com.

Spotlight 29 has a full schedule. At 8 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 4, the supergroup The Golden Boys—consisting of Fabian, Frankie Avalon and Bobby Rydell—will be returning to the Coachella Valley. They’ve been sharing the stage since 1985; the chance to see all three 1950s teen idols together has attracted many fans. Tickets are $45 to $65. At 8 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 25, singer-songwriter Gino Vannelli will be performing. He’s toured with Stevie Wonder and earned a Grammy nomination. Tickets are $25 to $45. Spotlight 29 Casino, 46200 Harrison Place, Coachella; 760-775-5566; www.spotlight29.com.

Morongo Casino Resort and Spa has a few events you won’t want to miss. At 9 p.m., Friday, Feb. 10, Uncle Kracker will be performing. Uncle Kracker started out as Kid Rock’s DJ and provided some of the rap lyrics on Kid Rock’s early albums. Uncle Kracker later broke free and found success on his own. Tickets are $29 to $40. At 6:30 p.m., Sunday, Feb. 19, producer and songwriter David Foster will be performing. Even if you’re unfamiliar with Mr. Foster, you’ve heard many of the songs he’s produced or written for other artists. He’s a big name in the music industry. Tickets are $55 to $75. Morongo Casino Resort Spa, 49500 Seminole Drive, Cabazon; 800-252-4499; www.morongocasinoresort.com.

Pappy and Harriet’s Pioneertown Palace, per usual, has a lot going. At 7 p.m., Friday, Feb. 10, Nickel Creek frontman Sean Watkins will be performing. He has released five solo albums of contemporary folk music. While these albums haven’t produced any hit singles, they’re all great. Tickets are $15. At 7 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 16, country music singer-songwriter Brandy Clark will be performing. Her songs have been recorded by musicians from Sheryl Crow to LeAnn Rimes. Tickets are $20. At 7 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 23, supergroup Crystal Fairy (below) will take the stage. It features Buzz Osborne and Dale Crover of the Melvins, Teri Gender Bender from Le Butcherettes, and Omar Rodriguez-Lopez of the Mars Volta and At the Drive-In. The psychedelic sound will melt your face; this is truly a kick-ass band. Crystal Fairy released a single, “Drugs on the Bus,” back in October, and I highly suggest giving it a listen. Tickets are $15. Pappy and Harriet’s Pioneertown Palace, 53688 Pioneertown Road, Pioneertown; 760-365-5956; www.pappyandharriets.com.

The Date Shed has an event worth mentioning. At 8 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 11, there will be a performance by Johnny Cash tribute band Cash’d Out, as well as a performance by my friend, CV Weekly writer Lisa Lynn Morgan, and her band Lisa and the Gents. Lisa has some mad country music credentials, an incredible voice and some great players backing her, including James St. James and Larry Gutierrez. Tickets are $12. The Date Shed, 50725 Monroe St., Indio; 760-775-6699; www.dateshedmusic.com.

Published in Previews

When the band Chicago released its first album in 1969, the group’s combination of jazz and classical elements with rock music was unlike anything ever heard before.

Now almost five decades later, the band is in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. The group will be performing at Fantasy Springs Resort Casino on Friday, July 1.

During a recent phone interview, Lee Loughnane, one of the band’s four remaining original members, discussed the group’s 2016 induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

“It took 25 years to get nominated,” Loughnane said. “It’s not that we didn’t care, but we didn’t think it would actually happen. When they decided to nominate us, we were shocked and excited. Even then, it was possible during the voting that we wouldn’t be elected to the induction ceremony. When that happened back in December 2015, and they announced the inductees, and we were one of them, it was pretty exciting.”

Also part of the 2016 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame class: N.W.A. Loughnane said there was only one thing that disappointed him regarding N.W.A.’s controversial induction. 

“I would have actually liked to have seen them perform at the ceremony. That’s one of the reasons you’re on the map—you’re there to show how you got you there,” he said. “For whatever reason, they decided it wasn’t appropriate. But it’s fun to be included with your peers—past, present and future. That’s something that something no one can take away from you. It’s like winning the World Series.”

When Chicago first began playing all those many years ago, the band was known for lengthier than usual songs. However, that changed somewhat over the years.

“Radio did a lot of editing,” Loughnane said with a laugh. “That’s how you keep them under 4 or 5 minutes. They usually only allow 3:30 or something like that. It’s very rare to hear a song that’s over 4 minutes on the radio. They have to pay their way and do a lot of ads. That’s what cuts the music down.

“Initially, we just wrote music. It wasn’t until commercial radio decided they wanted to play something of ours (that songs got shortened). We didn’t worry about how long a song was and just wrote and played. We do the same thing now.”

An oft-stated fun fact about Chicago is that Jimi Hendrix was a huge fan of the band and envied the guitar-playing abilities of Terry Kath. Chicago even toured with Hendrix.

“I remember hearing him say he thought Terry played better than him,” Loughnane said. “… (He felt) that he just played one gig after the other and got tired of the stuff he was playing. He felt that he should have been further than he was. But honestly, he was fine the way he was. It was just that internal push with the artist wanting to be better and open new avenues of music. There’s an inevitable period when you feel you’re not going it. When we met Jimi, it was at the end of his career just before he died. It was fun playing with him, opening for him and hanging with him. Not many people can say they got to do that.”

The accidental death of Terry Kath in 1978 due to a self-inflicted gunshot wound is still a tough subject for the original members of Chicago to discuss, even though the band kept on going.

“Terry’s death was the hardest thing to get through. … As memory serves, we thought that was the end of the band,” Loughnane said. “That was only a couple of weeks, and I’d be really surprised if it was more than a month before we realized Terry was gone, but the rest of us were still together, and it was still viable, and we had to replace Terry, which was no easy feat.”

From 1969 to 1980, the band released an album every year—racking up numerous hits along the way. Through most of the 1980s, the band released albums every other year. As a result, Chicago has a massive catalog of hits.

“It’s impossible to play all the hits in one show,” Loughnane said. “We have experimented through the years with various shows … and we put things in, and if it doesn’t work, it gets pulled out of the set, and we put something in that does. For the most part, we have been successful every night in making people happy.”

Loughnane said the city that gave the band its name is still a great place for music.

“Obviously, it influenced us. We grew up listening to blues and rock ’n’ roll, along with jazz and all the other musical influences that came through Chicago. It was part of our being as we became musicians. Today, that has continued with other artists growing up in the city and being influenced by whatever types of music they were listening to at the time. You can tell that Chicago is musically multifaceted.”

Chicago will perform with Rita Wilson at 8 p.m., Friday, July 1, at Fantasy Springs Resort Casino, 84245 Indio Springs Parkway, in Indio. Tickets are $39 to $79. For tickets or more information, call 760-342-5000, or visit www.fantasyspringsresort.com.

Published in Previews

It’s February, and you know what that means: Love is in the air for Valentine’s Day, and it’s also the month of Modernism Week.

Here are some local events during our shortest month.

The McCallum Theatre is booked solid through February with a ton of events. Cesar Millan will be stopping by the McCallum at 3 p.m., Sunday, Feb. 9. Although his famous show on the National Geographic Channel, Dog Whisperer With Cesar Millan, has ended, Millan is still sharing his techniques and wisdom in the field of dog-training; this live show should be a real treat (no pun intended) for dog-owners. Tickets are $45 to $75. Frank Sinatra Jr. (right) will be stopping by post Valentine’s Day, at 8 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 15. Although the younger Frank may be best known as the victim of a famous kidnapping, he is a talented performer in his own right, and has also branched out into acting over the years. Tickets are $45 to $85. Boz Scaggs will be at the McCallum at 8 p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 18. The sometimes-lead singer of the Steve Miller Band was a songwriting powerhouse in the ’70s and continues to put on a great show. Tickets are $55 to $95. Roberta Flack will be appearing at 8 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 22. Flack had a No. 1 hit in with “Killing Me Softly With His Song”; The Fugees would return the song to the top of the charts in 1996. Tickets are $35 to $85. McCallum Theatre, 73000 Fred Waring Drive, Palm Desert; 760-340-2787; www.mccallumtheatre.com.

After a slower January, Agua Caliente Casino Resort Spa has some fantastic events in the second half of February. If you’re a fan of soft rock, Air Supply (bottom of page) will be softly rocking for a special performance on Valentine’s Day, at 9 p.m., Friday, Feb. 14. Tickets are $35 to $55. The great Johnny Mathis will be appearing at 6 p.m., Sunday, Feb. 16. The romantic-ballads singer has been performing since 1956 and was one of a handful of crooners from his era who survived the wave of rock ’n’ roll. Tickets are $60 to $100. For fans of Jeff Dunham, you’ll be pleased to know that he will be joined by Walter, Peanut, Achmed the Dead Terrorist and the rest of the puppet gang at Agua Caliente at 8 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 22. Tickets are $85 to $135. The Show at Agua Caliente Casino Resort Spa, 32250 Bob Hope Drive, Rancho Mirage; 888-999-1995; www.hotwatercasino.com.

Spotlight 29 Casino doesn’t have a lot of events in February, but there are a couple worth noting. Kenny “Babyface” Edwards will be performing on Valentine’s Day, at 8 p.m., Friday, Feb. 14. The ’80s R&B star has had a long and successful career; not bad for a guy who originally started playing with Bootsy Collins—the man who gave Edwards his famous “Babyface” moniker. Tickets are $55 to $75. There will also be a tribute to Creedence Clearwater Revival at 8 p.m., Friday, Feb. 21. Attendance is free. Spotlight 29 Casino, 46200 Harrison Place, Coachella; 760-775-5566; www.spotlight29.com.

Fantasy Springs Resort Casino has a spectacular list of events for February. Chicago will be appearing at 8 p.m., Friday, Feb. 7. The band has been around since 1967, and still features four of the founding members. Since Terry Kath’s unintentional self-inflicted shooting death in 1978, the band has experienced a series of ups and downs, but they are survivors and have continued to make great music. Also: In Little Nicky, Adam Sandler discovered a rather hilarious subliminal message if you play their self-titled debut album backward during “Does Anybody Really Know What Time It Is?” If you haven’t seen it, YouTube it! It’ll blow your mind. Tickets are $39 to $69. CeeLo Green will be performing at 8 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 15. The singer of “F**k You” (or “Forget You,” whichever version you prefer) has managed to escape the potential one-hit wonder status used to describe his former project, Gnarls Barkley. While Danger Mouse swears that he and CeeLo will make another Gnarls Barkley album, Green’s success as a solo artist seems to throw that into question. Tickets are $39 to $69. Rick Springfield will be performing the following evening, at 8 p.m., Sunday, Feb. 16. The soap opera actor and “Jessie’s Girl” hit-maker has a fanatical, mostly female following. He’s still wildly popular and is the subject of a recent documentary, An Affair of the Heart, currently available via Netflix. Tickets are $29 to $49. Fresh out of bankruptcy court, Wayne Newton will be performing at 8 p.m., Sunday, Feb. 23. While Newton was the king of Vegas and has remained a music icon, recent photos of him seem to prove that age and plastic surgery don’t always go hand in hand. Tickets are $29 to $49. Fantasy Springs Resort Casino, 84245 Indio Springs Parkway; 760-342-5000; www.fantasyspringsresort.com.

Pappy and Harriet’s Pioneertown Palace, per usual, has some good shows booked for February. At 8 p.m., Sunday, Feb. 2, Futurebirds will be performing. The experimental indie band recently released a new album, Baba Yaga. They have been described as a “psychedelic country” band and have toured with the likes of the Drive-By Truckers, Widespread Panic and others. Admission is free. At 8 p.m., Friday, Feb. 14, Pappy’s will host a Valentine’s Day show with Ferraby Lionheart. Lionheart is an indie-rock performer out of Los Angeles. He has some very catchy tunes that will make for a non-traditional Valentine’s Day show. Take your sweetheart to Pappy’s for some pre-show barbecue and then enjoy the show; you won’t be disappointed—plus admission is free. There will be a show not to miss from Moistboyz (right) at 8 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 27. Moistboyz is a project that includes Dean Ween, formerly of Ween; Nick Oliveri, formerly of Queens of the Stone Age; and vocalist Guy Heller. The project has been around since 1994, when they released their debut album on the Beastie Boys’ now-defunct Grand Royal label. After the breakup of Dean and Gene Ween, it’s not a surprise Dean Ween has resurrected Moistboyz. The current touring lineup also includes Hoss Wright of Oliveri’s Mondo Generator. Tickets are $15. Pappy and Harriet’s Pioneertown Palace, 53688 Pioneertown Road, Pioneertown; 760-365-5956; www.pappyandharriets.com.

After requesting a list of events from The Date Shed, I was informed that the venue is now heading in a direction toward more private events. However, the venue still hosts shows from time to time. Along with the Tribal Seeds show, The Date Shed has Ozzmania booked at 9 p.m., Friday, Feb. 7. Ozzmania, a local Ozzy Osbourne and Black Sabbath tribute band, has received acclaim for excellent covers. A true metal fan wouldn’t miss it—plus it’s a free show, so there’s no excuse for not attending. The Date Shed, 50725 Monroe St., Indio; 760-775-6699; www.dateshedmusic.com.

The Hood Bar and Pizza has some great local shows going on. At 10 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 6, The Hoodwill host the second monthly Industry Night, featuring DJ Angelique. Attendance is free. At 10 p.m., Friday, Feb. 7, Mikey Raines Acoustic Movement will be performing, with The Hive Minds opening. Derek Gregg and Sean Poe of the Hive Minds are starting to sound tighter and tighter as they keep playing regularly. Since they parted ways with bassist Patrick “Tricky” Mitchem, they have yet to find a permanent replacement, but have brought in friends on occasion. Attendance is free. At 8 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 8, the aforementioned Mondo Generator will take the stage. While Nick Oliveri and some of the members of Mondo Generator are playing with Moistboyz at Pappy and Harriet’s later in the month, this is another not-to-miss show featuring Oliveri. At 9 p.m., Friday, Feb. 14, Long Duk Dong will be returning for a Valentine’s Day Show that will be themed like a 1980s prom. The Hood Bar and Pizza, 74360 Highway 111, Palm Desert; 760-636-5220; www.thehoodbar.com

The Ace Hotel in Palm Springs will be hosting Haunted Summer at 10 p.m., Friday, Feb. 21. After a successful show at Pappy and Harriet’s in January, the Los Angeles dream-pop duo is happy to be doing a performance for us here in the low desert. The Ace Hotel, 701 E. Palm Canyon Drive, Palm Springs; 760-325-9900; www.acehotel.com/palmsprings.

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