CVIndependent

Sun05272018

Last updateWed, 27 Sep 2017 1pm

Lance Riebsomer is one of the Coachella Valley’s most active singer-songwriters, probably best known for his old band, Foxy Cleopatra.

More than a year ago, Riebsomer took part of Foxy Cleopatra’s sound and morphed it into a new band called Black Water Gospel, which includes other notable locals such as David Morales (Eevaan Tre and the Show and Foxy Cleopatra), Matt Claborn, Alex Maestas (Robotic Humans) and Dan Dillinger (Bridger, and the Sweat Act).

Black Water Gospel will be throwing an EP release party on Sunday, Feb. 18, at the Big Rock Pub in Indio. The Flusters and Brightener will also be performing.

During a recent interview in Palm Desert over lunch, Riebsomer explained the link between Foxy Cleopatra and Black Water Gospel.

“Black Water Gospel plays some Foxy Cleopatra songs,” Riebsomer said. “Foxy Cleopatra was kind of like a collaboration until my mindset solidified. I kind of wanted to go in my own direction. (Foxy Cleopatra) was something that naturally just disbanded. David (Morales) played bass in Foxy Cleopatra, and now he plays guitar in Black Water Gospel.”

Speaking of Morales: Although he is quite humble, some in the local music scene consider him to be a genius.

“Anybody around town would say that about David. Anybody who is a musician would also say that about David. He plays every instrument; he can flawlessly do any kind of music; he can pick up on any song; and he does a lot of solo stuff around town for extra money,” Riebsomer said. “For me, his talent is like a security blanket. I’ve told him, ‘We can do this, because you’re going to make everything sound really good.’ He’s kind of like George Harrison: He may not have written the songs, but he makes them a lot better. The songs that he does write are good, too. He’s also a kind human being and one of my best friends.

“What’s frustrating is he’s always booked. I’ll be like, ‘C’mon, let’s play this!’ and he’ll say, ‘I’m already booked.’ He probably plays six nights a week, and he really grinds.”

Riebsomer explained how they picked up Matt Claborn; he had been in a post-hardcore band that once played the Vans Warped Tour.

“Dan (Dillinger) left for Austria over the summer after he went through a hard time with his mom passing away and the Sweat Act broke up,” Riebsomer said. “We were still wanting to keep some momentum going while he was gone, so we asked our friend Matt—whom Alex, David and I have known since we were teenagers—to fill in on bass for the few gigs that we had while Dan was in Austria. We had a friend make a music video for us, too. It was funny, because we ended up doing a bunch of stuff while Dan was gone.

“When Dan gets back, he asked us, ‘Am I still in your band?’ and we were like ‘Yeah!’ We decided Matt was a good fit personality-wise, and the record we have recorded has a lot of guitar work in it, so I thought adding Matt as the third guitarist would give me the freedom to be more of a frontman and play less guitar. … It’s the same thing as the Foo Fighters: They have three guitarists, and it works well for them.”

Riebsomer explained what people can expect to be on the EP.

“Everybody knows ‘Alone’ and ‘Downtown,’” he said. “(And there’s) ‘Cleaning Up the Mess,’ which we don’t play very often, but it’s the last song on the EP. It’s kind of this Verve-like ballad. All these songs, I wrote when I moved back to the desert four years ago about somebody who completely broke me. I was trying to figure out the best way to cope with it and trying to not sound emo about it, (but instead write) something eloquent about how I felt, while keeping the rock ’n’ roll aspect of it.”

Riebsomer explained what’s important to him when he writes a song.

“I think first and foremost, it has to be believable,” he said. “There’s a perfect equation of having a song that makes people go, ‘Oh, that’s cool; I’d listen to it again.’ I think that in this time in modern music, making it believable is lost, and trying to pump out something that’s going to make money and pleasant to hear is more important.”

I asked Riebsomer about his favorite desert songwriters.

“I would say as far as songwriting goes and structure of the songs that I relate to, Will Sturgeon of Brightener (is a favorite), especially for his age,” he said. “Some of the songs off of his album Hummingbird caught me in the moment. He’s a fantastic songwriter. That’s why I asked Brightener to play this show. The style of Brightener is what I would describe as “innocent.” (The members of) Brightener aren’t as rock as other people, but I love Will’s music. He’s done more than a lot of musicians out here have done. He’s played Coachella; he’s played really big gigs in Los Angeles; and he’s had his music played on MTV, but he doesn’t really talk about that, and he’s so humble about it.”

Originally, the band thought about doing an EP-release show at The Hood Bar and Pizza, but the members decided to take it to the Big Rock Pub instead.

“We wanted to do something different,” he said. “We played the Big Rock Pub before, and we had a good experience. They’ve given David and me work on Sunday mornings, too. I was there recently, and they had some rock band that was playing ’90s nostalgia kind of stuff, but the sound was really good.”

Black Water Gospel will perform with The Flusters and Brightener at 7 p.m., Sunday, Feb. 18, at Big Rock Pub, 79940 Westward Ho Drive, in Indio. Admission is free. For more information, visit www.facebook.com/BlackWaterGospel.

Published in Previews

July is going to be hot—but never fear, because there are some great air-conditioned events going on.

Fantasy Springs Resort Casino is again the place to be in July. At 8 p.m., Saturday, July 2, get some advice on how to know when to hold them, and know when to fold them, when Kenny Rogers performs. The pop-country icon has sold more than 120 million albums! Tickets are $29 to $69. At 8 p.m., Saturday, July 9, pop-star Kesha will be stopping in. Since 2010, Kesha has taken the music world by storm—although many still don’t know what to make of her. After a nasty court battle with producer Dr. Luke, she’s returning to live performances and seems to be heading down a different creative path. Tickets are $39 to $79. At 8 p.m., Friday, July 29, get out your dancing shoes, because Earth, Wind and Fire is coming back to town. It’s been a rough year for the group due to the death of founding member Maurice White, but the band is still in demand and continues to dazzle audiences. Tickets are $49 to $79. Fantasy Springs Resort Casino, 84245 Indio Springs Parkway, Indio; 760-342-5000; www.fantasyspringsresort.com.

Agua Caliente Casino Resort Spa has several intriguing events in July. At 8 p.m., Saturday, July 16, standup comedian Brian Regan will perform. Regan, who is known to refrain from using profanity, is quite popular across all age groups and has been going strong since the ’90s. Tickets are $55 to $85. There’s another event worth mentioning if you are a fan of world music: At 6:30 p.m., Saturday, July 30, there will be a show by Armenian singer Armenchik. Born in Armenia and raised in Los Angeles, Armenchik showed a natural talent for singing at a young age and has performed all around the world. Tickets are $60 to $150. The Show at Agua Caliente Casino Resort Spa, 32250 Bob Hope Drive, Rancho Mirage; 888-999-1995; www.hotwatercasino.com.

Spotlight 29 is going to heat up at 8 p.m., Friday, July 22, when Maxwell (right) stops by. In 1996, Maxwell released Maxwell’s Urban Hang Suite, which is said to have changed R&B forever. Maxwell’s singing ability is right up there with that of Marvin Gaye; it’s no wonder that Urban Hang Suite was a hit, even though Maxwell did it without much commercial support. In fact, the album went on to sell 2 million copies. If there is one show you shouldn’t miss in July, this is the one. Tickets are $71 to $111. Spotlight 29 Casino, 46200 Harrison Place, Coachella; 760-775-5566; www.spotlight29.com.

Pappy and Harriet’s Pioneertown Palace has a solid schedule through July. Ted Quinn, the longtime host of the free open-mic nights on Mondays, has stepped down. During July, Pappy’s is bringing in a series of guest hosts: Jesika Von Rabbit on July 4; Leslie Mariah Andrews of the Small Wonder Experience on July 11; Bella Dawn on July 18; and Lee Joseph on July 25. In other news: At 9 p.m., Sunday, July 10, the group Imarhan will be performing. Imarhan performs Tuareg music, which has a soulful and groovy rhythm. Sadam, Imarhan’s frontman, is the cousin of Eyadou Ag Leche, of Tinariwen, who also helped write some of the music for Imarhan’s self-titled debut album. Tickets are $15 to $17. At 8:30 p.m., Saturday, July 16, the queen of the high desert, Jesika Von Rabbit, will take the stage. Also on the bill: Death Valley Girls. Hopefully this performance will mark the return of Von Rabbit’s dancing man, Larry Van Horn, who recently told me he suffered a leg injury, but is getting back into the groove. Last but certainly not least, at 8 p.m., Saturday, July 30, The Evangenitals will be coming back yet again for a guaranteed great time. The show is free! Pappy and Harriet’s Pioneertown Palace, 53688 Pioneertown Road, Pioneertown; 760-365-5956; www.pappyandharriets.com.

The Coachella Valley Art Scene is teaming up with the Ultrastar Mary Pickford Theatre in Cathedral City for the second summer in a row. Each Friday, a local band will play from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. On Friday, July 1, Giselle Woo will be performing. On Friday, July 8, David Morales from EeVaan Tre and the Show will take the stage; on Friday, July 15, The Flusters are the act; on Friday, July 22, EeVaan Tre himself will be performing, and on Friday, July 29, Madison Ebersole will perform. Admission is free. Ultrastar Mary Pickford Theater, 36850 Pickfair St., Cathedral City; 760-328-7100; www.ultrastarmovies.com.

Copa Palm Springs will be hosting comedian and actor Leslie Jordan (below) again at 8 p.m., Friday, July 1; 8 p.m., Saturday, July 2; and 7:30 p.m., Sunday, July 3. He’ll be performing his one man show, Straight Outta Chattanooga. Tickets are $25 to $45. Copa, 244 E. Amado Road, Palm Springs; 760-322-3554; www.coparoomtickets.com.

Published in Previews

After a recent performance by EeVaan Tre and the Show at the Coachella Valley Art Scene, I asked Tre: “Why R&B and soul music?”

He laughed. However, David Morales, the bassist, had an answer.

“It’s how we feel.”

The powerful R&B and soul of EeVaan Tre and the Show has not only made the group one of the valley’s best bands; it also landed the group a slot at Coachella in 2015. The band’s live show is exceptional; it’s truly feel-good music.

“I personally love the R&B from the ’80s,” Tre said, “the real cheesy love stuff. I guess it’s just a reflection of how we grew up and what we like. We all really dig the same stuff. … I guess that’s why I like to perform R&B and soul. I guess for myself, my exposure to it was in a specific way. I grew up listening to doo-wop. Doo-wop was first for me, and then pop music.”

Before a performance at The Hood Bar and Pizza earlier this year, Tre invited DJ Alex Harrington and me to his car, where he showed us some of his used vinyl purchases from that day: Marvin Gaye, Diana Ross and Bobby Womack albums.

“For me, some of the new stuff is the old stuff,” Tre said. “When I first started to work on this project, I was inspired by the latest Daft Punk album and just how they created the music. They basically made it to where you don’t need any rules, and you can break into strings here or there if you want, and that’s the shit. That kind of did it all for me, and it made me say, ‘Fuck it; let’s just do whatever it is that comes out of us. We’ll make it work.’”

When it comes to writing music, Tre said he has no problem making it personal.

“On my own, I find it kind of easy. It’s really personal, and some artists like to be personal at times,” Tre said. “Some people are really reserved about their feelings. … I love feeding off of different vibes and energies in the room when I perform. It creates an environment for me to be creative and do something out of the box.”

Performing at Coachella was definitely a highlight for a group.

“I remember going into Coachella, and it was so last minute when we were called in to do it,” he said. “We didn’t think we were prepared going into it, knowing we weren’t performing at the level we were supposed to be. Coachella has amazing performers from all over the world, and we went there to learn what it really takes to be at that level.

“Other than that, the experience was amazing, because I got to spend it with my friends. My best friends are all my band members. It was a learning experience, because it’s different when you’re standing behind the artist onstage watching how they do it, as opposed to being in front of it watching them as part of the audience. It’s different, and we learned from it.”

There is plenty of room to grow and evolve, and EeVaan Tre and the Show is open to new music and new inspiration, Tre said.

“I think we always overthink it, and we’ve learned that music is an in-the-moment thing,” he said. “When you got something and you put it down, that’s what it is as far as capturing the moment. … I think that further along, it will have another feel if it’s destined to feel different. I feel that the sound will progress, because we will continue to learn different sounds, create and be curious. We’re always listening to different records.”