CVIndependent

Sat11172018

Last updateTue, 18 Sep 2018 1pm

There are a lot of cool things to see at Stagecoach—and Pokey LaFarge was the coolest thing to see on Saturday afternoon in the Mustang Tent.

The St. Louis-born and -raised performer is a true roots-music enthusiast. He’s not a revival act; he lives and breathes vintage music from the ’30s and ’40s.

On Saturday, he was clad in a vintage button-down shirt, navy jeans cuffed around his cowboy boots, and a vintage black hat. He often wears suits with cuts from the ’30s and ’40s, as well as other vintage clothing. One thing’s for sure: He looked dressed and ready for Stagecoach.

Starting his set with “Something in the Water,” Pokey LaFarge made it clear right away that his live show includes elements you don’t always hear on his records: In person, you can hear hints of big-band jazz, calypso, Latin, Americana and country-Western in his repertoire.

The large crowd that gathered in the smaller-sized Mustang tent loved him, and was clapping and singing along to the choruses to his songs. He led a sing-along during “Central Time,” about being a plain-old Midwestern boy trying to survive in the Central Time Zone. He declared that while he doesn’t have a problem with the East Coast or the West Coast, he wouldn’t live in either.

One interesting moment came late in the set when he performed a country-Western/roots-style cover of Warren Zevon and Jackson Browne’s “Carmelita.” The chorus: “And I’m all strung out on heroin on the outskirts of town.” It proved that although much of Pokey LaFarge’s music is upbeat, he’s not afraid to venture into the dark side. There was a lot of variety to be had in Pokey’s 45-minute set—and it was never dull.

Pokey LaFarge is not the only Americana revivalist to come through Stagecoach and put on a fine performance—but nobody that I have seen has ever won over a crowd as well as he did, especially inside the Mustang Tent, a place where Stagecoach attendees often seek shade or even take a nap on one of the bales of hay. With a horn-section, banjo and acoustic guitars, and swing-jazz style drumming, LaFarge won over the audience easily—and proved that he can not only play for a crowd of Americana purists; he can easily entertain the audience of Stagecoach.

See more Stagecoach Day 2 photos below, by Kevin Fitzgerald.

Published in Reviews

This year’s Stagecoach lineup—one of the better slates in recent years, despite the high number of repeat performers—includes a nice variety: big Nashville stars, country legends, and new players in the game. Americana, outlaw country and a bunch of other genres are being mashed together for an unforgettable weekend.

Here are the acts I’ll be sure to catch at Stagecoach.


Friday, April 29

Dale Watson

Hank Williams III has given Watson (right) a nod, as have many other alternative-country bands and outlaw-country purists. Watson is a true outsider and has written songs about his distaste for the modern Nashville country machine that sells millions of records—even though no one is singing real country songs anymore. Well, Watson’s music is the real deal, and while he’s not a big name, he’s loved by alt-country fans and underground/indie music critics. That’s worth something.

Emmylou Harris

Emmylou Harris is often mentioned along with Gram Parsons and Willie Nelson—both because she’s on the same footing as a country-music legend, and because she’s worked with them both extensively. During her early career, she was actually Parsons’ creative partner. She’s won 12 Grammy awards, is a member of the Grand Ole Opry, is an inductee to the Country Music Hall of Fame, and is one of the most influential women in rock ’n’ roll. Need any other reasons to catch her set at Stagecoach?

Robert Earl Keen

He may not be the biggest name, but this guy has written songs that have been covered by the Dixie Chicks, Lyle Lovett, The Highwaymen and many others in country music. Not only is he a fantastic songwriter; he’s one of the Americana music scene’s crown jewels. Dig out some of this guy’s music if you need any more convincing. I am truly excited about the opportunity to see him live.

Eric Church

I was sort of skeptical of the Friday headliner, given he is a big modern Nashville success story. However, he’s one of the few who has earned that success by doing things his own way—a way that, at times, sort of scares people. His band members look like they’d fit right in with some of the nastiest metal bands; his fans wear T-shirts with skeletons flipping the bird that say “Eric Fucking Church” on the back; and his material touts marijuana-smoking, Jack Daniels and Bruce Springsteen. He’s the one headliner I will definitely watch.


Saturday, April 30

Jamestown Revival

Hailing from Magnolia, Texas, this duo sports a name that references one of the first European settlements in what became the United States. These guys are country-music storytellers in the spirit of Willie Nelson, Louis L’Amour, John Prine and others. They have a brand of folk music that meets Americana, and then meets country. As a result, this standout group is starting to build a faithful audience. In the short time they’ve been on the scene, the duo has played at Coachella, Bonnaroo and Austin City Limits. They’re on the path to becoming one of the biggest new things in country music à la Sturgill Simpson and Shovels and Rope, so be sure to check them out.

Langhorne Slim and the Law

It’s hard to believe this guy has been around since 1999 and has toured with the Avett Brothers, Violent Femmes, Old 97’s and many other big name acts—yet he remains an independent artist. He’s probably one of the best modern-day songwriters, yet not that many people know about him. This is someone you’ll definitely want to put on your list; whether you’re going for the Big Nashville bands or the Americana and alternative-country acts, you’ll agree that he belongs at Stagecoach. Also: Do the music world a solid by buying some of his merchandise and telling your friends about him.

Pokey LaFarge

Pokey LaFarge is to country music as Nick Waterhouse is to rock ’n’ roll: They’re young men who have an appreciation for the old-school style. Pokey hails from St. Louis, performs country-swing music, and expresses distaste for most modern music. He grew up on his grandfather’s music, dresses the part of an old Americana performer, and has a sound that is a throwback to another time—and he pulls it all off brilliantly. He released a record on Third Man Records and was produced by Jack White himself; that alone should give him some credibility.

John Fogerty

Creedence Clearwater Revisited, which just played a show here, is successful and fun to watch. But let’s face facts: John Fogerty was the driving force behind Creedence Clearwater Revival. Fogerty has found success beyond the nasty end to Creedence Clearwater Revival, and he continues to play Creedence songs in his set. Considering there was a lot of Southern influence in the legendary band’s brand of rock ’n’ roll, Fogerty fits in at Stagecoach. In fact, he played a fantastic set at Stagecoach in 2008.


Sunday, May 1

Emi Sunshine

I interviewed Emi Sunshine (below), now 11, for her show at Pappy and Harriet’s last summer, and I was instantly charmed by her Southern accent, her love for old country music, and her fondness for the ukulele. Considering she’s already played the Ryman Auditorium (the former Grand Ole Opry House), has been on national television and has toured the United States extensively, she’s going to be a hit at Stagecoach.

The Marshall Tucker Band

When it comes to Southern rock, the Marshall Tucker Band is a name that always comes to mind. “Can’t You See” and “Heard It in a Love Song” are Southern-rock staples and continue to be played on radio stations across the country. While the band has endured a lot of lineup changes, frontman Doug Gray is keeping the group going strong. Word is the band is still great live.

The Doobie Brothers

The Doobie Brothers seem sort of out of place at Stagecoach—but that’s not a bad thing. Numerous acts have been considered out of place at Stagecoach in the past, including Don McLean and The Eagles. This is one of best rock bands of all time, and there’s no doubt the group will turn in a great performance at Stagecoach.

Little Big Town

I reviewed Little Big Town’s show at Fantasy Springs last fall, and while I’m not usually a fan of the Nashville sound, Little Big Town put on a marvelous performance that was energetic and nearly flawless. This is a great live band, and songs such as “Little White Church” and “Girl Crush” will likely get an enthusiastic crowd response. They are the one “Mane Stage” act I highly recommend; you won’t be disappointed.

Published in Previews

The Stagecoach 2016 lineup was released today—and it marks a huge improvement over the 2015 slate.

That’s not to say the lineup for the 10th Stagecoach festival does not include a lot of performers that have taken the Stagecoach stage before. Eric Church headlined Friday night in 2014; Luke Bryan also headlined in 2014, on Sunday. With two headliners returning just two years later—on the same nights to boot—one has to wonder if there are a limited amount of artists from which festival organizer Goldenvoice can choose.

That’s also not to say that many people weren’t disappointed in the absence of one, big rumored name: Garth Brooks. While there don’t seem to be too many complaints about the lineup on the Stagecoach Facebook page as of this writing, there are some comments about how it seems the list of headliners and performers seem to be repeating.

There are also complaints regarding Stagecoach’s strict RV-resort policies, limited spaces, and the application process for those spaces. The prices of the RV resort—ranging from $550 to $950—are also a sore subject. Goldenvoice has greatly reduced the amount of on-site RV camping in recent years.

Now, to the ample positives: There are some great smaller names for those who aren’t into the mainstream Nashville country scene. Dale Watson is popular to alt-country fans, especially those who reject the modern Nashville sound. Lucero, a country-punk band that has played at Coachella, will be making its Stagecoach debut. Third Man Records artist Pokey LaFarge, an old-time Americana artist, will be a real crowd pleaser for those who love bluegrass and the old Americana sound. You can also never go wrong with performers such as Emmylou Harris, Billie Joe Shaver, Robert Earl Keen, John Fogerty and the Doobie Brothers.

Who knows what memorable moments 2016’s Stagecoach fest will offer? There have been many memorable moments, such as The Eagles performing in 2008, Rascal Flatts announcing the death of Osama Bin Laden in 2011, Nick 13 of Tiger Army’s first ever solo performance in 2010, and a day of mourning and tributes to George Jones after the announcement of his death on the first day of the festival in 2013.