CVIndependent

Tue04072020

Last updateFri, 03 Apr 2020 5pm

Skateboarding and punk rock have long been connected—but for the members of GFP, aka General Fucking Principle, they are both ways of life.

The relatively new punk supergroup is scheduled to play at The Hood Bar and Pizza on Saturday, Sept. 21.

GFP consists of former DFL (Dead Fucking Last) vocalist Tom Paul Davis, aka Crazy Tom; skateboarding legend and Dogtown Z-Boy Tony Alva on bass; Bad Religion and Circle Jerks guitarist Greg Hetson; and drummer Grant Garrison, who played with H.R. of the Bad Brains.

Davis originally had the idea for GFP back in 2009.

“We came together after I went to see The Germs and Suicidal Tendencies reunion concert in Los Angeles,” said Davis during a recent phone interview. “I had an itching to get back into music. I skated a pool before with Alva, and it just sort of came to me. I thought, ‘Hey, I should call Alva, and we should get together and do a jam.’ I had a drummer who I was thinking about for a little while, and I kind of worked to put the pieces of the puzzle together from there.

The band has suffered through some lineup changes in its relatively brief time. There were originally two guitarists when the band went into the studio, but Davis had a hard time getting along with guitarist Aime Caron.

“We went to record a demo, and he wanted to kick the other guitar player out of the band,” Davis explained. “He went ahead and did that. He was like, ‘I can handle the whole load by myself,’ and I was like, ‘All right, dude. I’m not going to keep having these brawls with you. If you think you can handle it, go ahead.’ We went to do the demo, and he just kinda bugged out on my idea, which was to go into the recording studio to do our 14 songs live and record them as fast as possible without a whole bunch of overdubs and Pro Tools tracking-style stuff, which he was used to doing.”

That’s when Davis reached out to Hetson. “What happened is we asked Greg to help us produce the demo, and he liked the music a lot. When I called Greg and told him Aime quit the band, and I asked him if he felt like playing guitar, he said yes.”

While the band members are all decidedly unique individuals with independent visions, Davis said there haven’t been any problems.

“Actually, everything is organic between me, Greg and Alva,” he said. “We all come from Hollywood, Los Angeles and beach cities, so we’re all influenced by the same bands we grew up with—Black Flag, The Germs, The Weirdos, TSOL and X. … The rest of the guys are a little older than me, so I look up to them as big brothers.”

Alva is one of the pioneers of skateboarding and was a part of the Zephyr skateboarding team in the ‘70s in Venice Beach. While Alva is known more for skateboarding, he has been involved in the punk scene as the bassist for The Skoundrelz.

“He is an incredible bass-player,” said Davis. “He plays without a pick, which is a really incredible bass-playing style in punk rock.”

While punk rock never died, it did go through a dry spell in the last decade. Today, the drought is over: GFP is one of several newer punk-rock supergroups, while older punk bands are reuniting or recording again.

“Some of the bands I grew up with are Pennywise, NOFX and Rancid. DFL was on Epitaph with all those guys,” Davis said. “When we broke up, those bands just continued to keep playing. They didn’t break up, but they didn’t get any bigger and just kept going. I think a lot of bands just watched what happened and realized it and said, ‘We should get back together.’

“What’s amazing is all these bands are still out there from when I was a kid and when I was on Epitaph. It’s great to see it still going strong. I think a lot of it has to do with skateboarding being a major influence in punk rock. Skateboarding is popular as well.”

The band is currently recording its debut album, which Davis said has been delayed due to the departure of drummer Amery Smith, of Suicidal Tendencies. Davis said that they hope to have the album out within the next six months.

When it comes to their show at The Hood, Davis said he is excited.

“I really enjoy the shows away from Los Angeles,” Davis said. “People here are controlled by stargazing and shoegazing. … I would expect an old-school vibe; we like to bring our skateboards. We like to hang out in the crowd and talk to people. I think it’s going to be really fun.”

Davis did have one concern about playing in the Coachella Valley.

“I hope there’s air-conditioning!” he said.

GFP will play with Year of the Dragon and Throw the Goat at 9 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 21, at The Hood Bar and Pizza, 74360 Highway 111 in Palm Desert. Admission is $5, and there are no presales. For more information, call 760-636-5220, or track down the event on Facebook.

Published in Previews

People are often amused (or bemused) by Jeremiah Saint’s “goth” appearance. However, Jeremiah Saint is even more amused by those people’s reactions to his appearance.

He’s playing at The Hood on Thursday, Aug. 15, as a member of DieSineGration, a band which is playing its final show that night. Saint’s newly formed solo project, DECAYEDen, will open for DieSineGration. They will be followed by metal-band Sinister X.

The 32-year-old Palm Desert resident refers to himself as a “band whore.” He’s been a part of several local groups, including Phase Theory, Regenerator (as a touring member) and DieSineGration. He has also worked as a producer and sound engineer, and has even written a book that can be found on Amazon.com. In other words, he’s a workaholic who stays busy.

As for his new project DECAYEDen, he explained that he got the idea from a personal hardship.

“It’s been in the back of my mind for five years: I was going to be a father, and the child passed away in the womb,” said Saint. “I took the first name of what I was going to name my son, which was Decayeden. I took that, and I wrote it into an industrial, dark-wave format.”

He recently self-released a new album, Dead Angels and Forgotten Ghosts.

“It’s really hard to classify,” said Saint. “Almost every song on the album can be classified as a different genre. To keep it simple, I call it ‘electronic, experimental dark-rock.’ The project (includes) a lot of how I see myself, how I see society, how I see the government, and the relationships and friendships that I have been through.”

Despite Saint’s goth-like image, he hates the term and refutes the stereotypes that are given to people with similar appearances.

“I don’t view myself as goth,” Saint said. “I’m a dude who wears makeup, who doesn’t always wear black, and who has a dark life, but I almost view it as an insult. I’m not emo; I’m not into Twilight; and I don’t worship Satan. I’m an atheist, and I’m a vegan. As a kid, I was always obsessed with the study of dark arts, magic, Aleister Crowley, H.P. Lovecraft and Edgar Allan Poe. It’s stereotypical, but it’s enthralled me and inspired me. For me, it’s just my artistic being.”

Does pain make great art? Saint would have to say yes.

“Pain makes beautiful art,” said Saint. “It makes some of the most beautiful art we’ve ever seen. It’s void of multimedia facets trying to sell it and without the sham of ‘everything is going to be all right.’ A lot of people skip over that.”

As a local musician, Saint noted the many changes that have occurred over the years in the local music scene.

“I just see it different now. Everything has changed so much,” said Saint. “I remember sneaking into the local clubs here, going to Peabody’s to see local bands, or being in one those local bands. It was so much different. Everybody wanted to be there to see the shows. People wanted to play, and no one cared back then about getting paid: It was just about the shows.”

On the subject of being both the opening act (as DECAYEDen) and playing as keyboardist in DieSineGration’s last show, Saint said the pairing simply made sense.

“We were looking at the lineup, and I figured since I had my sequences ready that I could do a DECAYEDen show,” said Saint. “I can open that up and then play in DieSineGration, and I figured, ‘Why the hell not?’ I’m looking forward to it: Put on one more amazing show with DieSineGration, and maybe get some new people to hear DECAYEDen.”

DieSineGration, DECAYEDen and Sinister X will play on Thursday, Aug. 15, at The Hood Bar and Pizza, 74360 Highway 111, in Palm Desert. Doors open for the 21-and-over show at 9 p.m. Admission is free. Call 760-636-5220, or track down the event’s Facebook page for more information.

Published in Previews

Hide the kids! Hide the wife, and take cover! The Dwarves are coming to The Hood on Friday, Aug. 16.

Formed in 1982 in the suburbs of Chicago, the Dwarves came together playing garage rock. As they crafted their early hardcore-punk sound, they became one of the first bands to use samples and drum loops.

Their live performances later became notorious for onstage acts that included violence, drug use and GG Allin-style self-mutilation. The band’s frontman, Blag Dahlia, had an infamous violent altercation backstage at Los Angeles’ Dragonfly club with Queens of the Stone Age frontman Josh Homme in 2004. It earned Homme a court-ordered trip to rehab and anger management classes.

When asked whether the violence might be taken too far someday, Blag says the day has already come.

“I’ve been stabbed. I’ve been beaten over the head, and I’ve had my throat slit,” said Blag, during a recent phone interview from Los Angeles. “All the guys in the band have suffered various violent altercations. We’ve given in to the goodness of God sometimes. It’s all part of what rock n roll is: You don’t exactly know what’s going to happen, and it just goes. The music is very energetic, and it kind of inspires those kinds of responses. Shit happens.”

Blag added that people who say “Blag got his ass kicked at the show” have it all wrong. “Anyone who ever tried to kick my ass got it back just as bad as they thought they were giving it out,” said Blag.

In another controversial episode, the band issued a press release in 1993 that stated their guitar-player, HeWhoCannotBeNamed, was stabbed to death. Turns out that was a hoax, and the incident led to the band being dropped from Sub-Pop Records.

However, Blag has a different point of view on the events.

“(HeWhoCannotBeNamed) is the creature who transcends life and death,” said Blag. “At times, there are those who believed he was no longer among us. He’s like a very material sort of entity, and he’s an icon of rock and roll. So these concepts of life and death sort of have a different meaning for him.”

Through all of the controversy, the band has had a successful recording career. Blag has also produced albums for the Swingin’ Utters, The God Awfuls, and former Queens of the Stone Age bassist Nick Oliveri’s group Mondo Generator. (Oliveri is also a member of the Dwarves, playing under the alias of Rex Everything.) He’s written two novels: Armed to the Teeth With Lipstick and Nina.

In what some would call an unexpected move, Blag also recorded “Doing the Sponge” for an episode of SpongeBob SquarePants.

“One of our former members, Salt Peter, has written a lot of material for SpongeBob,” said Blag. “He wrote a bunch of novelty songs that they do in there. So early on in the first season, he had written a song for them. They wanted somebody who sounded like Lux Interior of The Cramps, and he’s one of my favorite singers; I said, ‘I can go in there and sound like Lux,’ and so I did. It was a lot of fun, and it makes me popular with those in the 8-years-old crowd.”

Blag said he looks back on the band’s musical accomplishments with unapologetic pride.

“We’re undoubtedly more known for the controversy, but that’s not because we haven’t left a bunch of great music behind,” said Blag. “We’re the only punk band that gets better with time, and the only one anyone can conceive of … (that) continues to be great. This is a band that makes classic record after classic record. We just keep pushing the boundaries of genres. We’ve had outstanding musicianship, outstanding production with Top 10 producers, and great studio players. The Dwarves are one of the best-recorded bands in history. The fact that people don’t know that has a lot more to do with marketing (than) the quality of the music.”

What does the future hold for the Dwarves? They’ve been in the studio recording and are hoping to release a new album within the next year. (Their most recent studio album was 2011's The Dwarves Are Born Again.) In the meantime, they’ve booked some shows (including the one at The Hood) to keep them busy. Blag also does a podcast called Radio Like You Want.

They’re also no strangers to the Coachella Valley.

“We played there with Kyuss when they didn’t have a club there, and there was a nudist colony that people used to do shows at,” said Blag. “We just got done doing some recording in Joshua Tree. I’m looking forward to going out there and seeing some of our friends in the desert. We’ve always loved the desert.”

The Dwarves will play with the Hellions, the Atom Age and Hot Beat Acoustic at 8 p.m., Friday, Aug. 16, at The Hood Bar and Pizza, 74360 Highway 111 in Palm Desert. Admission is $10, and there are no presales. For more information, call 760-636-5220, or visit thehoodbar.com.

Published in Previews

After 25 years and nine albums, the Voodoo Glow Skulls aren’t phased by changes in the music industry—and are still going strong with thanks in part to their DIY work ethic.

The band will return to the desert to perform at The Hood Bar and Pizza on Thursday, July 18.

The Casillas brothers—Frank (lead vocals), Eddie (guitar) and Jorge (bass)—formed the Riverside punk/ska outfit in 1988.

“Back in those days in Riverside, backyard parties were the only gigs you could get,” said Frank Casillas during a recent phone interview. “Shortly after, we learned how to play our instruments and had enough songs; it led to us playing at the only local club, which was Spanky’s Café.”

At Spanky’s Café, which was a historic venue in Riverside, the band started getting booked to play with headliners like The Dickies, fIREHOSE, and Mighty Mighty Bosstones, just to name a few. The group eventually found themselves with an increasing following throughout Southern California. They signed with Dr. Strange Records in 1993 and released Who Is, This Is?. They then went on to sign with Epitaph Records and released four albums with the label, the first of which was Firme, in 1995.

“We sold a lot of records on Epitaph,” said Frank Casillas. “It just got us to the next level. We were able to go to Europe for the first time. For us, the first time traveling abroad and playing our music to an audience overseas was pretty cool. We were this little band that started playing out of a bedroom in Riverside, and all of a sudden, five or six years later, we’re playing these big festivals in Europe.”

After their contract was up with Epitaph in 2000, they decided signed with Victory Records, which was at the time an exclusive punk/hardcore music label with a controversial reputation. However, that soon began to change.

“We felt Victory Records was becoming the next Epitaph at the time we signed with them. But they were starting to attract the demographic of the emo, post-hardcore crowd. We were on the label when it was cool, but it just seemed they were going through the motion with us. We didn’t fit in with that crowd of bands,” Frank Casillas said.

The band left Victory Records in 2007 for Smelvis Records, and after four years of recording in a home studio, put out Break the Spell in 2012. Alternative Press hailed the album as “kick-ass in both tone and message.”

The band values their creative freedom; they shun the idea of having business managers. They book their own dates, are in control of their own merchandising, and continue to do well financially.

In part because they continue to succeed, Frank Casillas doesn’t believe in the saying “punk rock is dead.”

“I think things are going back to full circle. It’s also going back to the roots of the underground,” he said. “A lot of the older bands are starting to come back and play again. You have two different versions of Black Flag out on tour right now, and a lot of the old British bands are coming back.”

Frank said the band loves playing in the desert. Having performed one show at The Hood before, they’re excited to be coming back.

“It’s very similar to Riverside,” said of the Coachella Valley. "It’s not a big city, and it seems that any of the bands that go out there are more appreciated, and the shows are always pretty good. It’s a cool place for us to play.”

Voodoo Glow Skulls play at 8 p.m., Thursday, July 18, at The Hood Bar and Pizza, 74360 Highway 111, in Palm Desert. Spankshaft will open. Admission to the 21-and-older show is $10, and there are no presales, so attendees are advised to arrive early. For more information, visit thehoodbar.com.

Published in Previews

Jack Kohler, 23, sings and plays the keyboard for War Drum, a band described on their Facebook page thusly: “From the sun-dripped hills of the desert comes WAR DRUM, a self-described psychedelic spook rock sound.” When he’s not playing psychedelic spook rock, the Indio resident and La Quinta native works in music promotion at the Ace Hotel, among other activities; he is also a member of the band WAXY. War Finder just got done with a European tour in support of its latest album, Fortune Finder, and they’ll celebrate their homecoming on Friday, May 24, at The Hood Bar and Pizza, 74360 Highway 111, in Palm Desert. Tribesmen will join the men of War Drum for the free show, which kicks off at 9 p.m. For more, head to www.wearewardrum.com, or seek out the band on Facebook.

What was the first concert you attended?

Probably Styx or something weird with my parents.

What was the first album you owned?

The Doors, The Soft Parade.

What bands are you listening to right now?

Tame Impala, The Black Angels, Sleepy Sun, Father John Misty, The Asteroid #4, WAXY.

What artist, genre or musical trend does everyone love, but you don’t get?

Dubstep. What’s going on there?

What musical act, current or defunct, would you most like to see perform live?

Pink Floyd, Syd Barrett era. I always wanted to see what that was all about.

What’s your favorite musical guilty pleasure?

ELO. I don’t know why I like them so much, but every time I put them on at a party, everyone hates it.

What’s your favorite music venue?

No brainer: Pappy and Harriet’s Pioneertown Palace. Long live Pappy’s!

What’s the one song lyric you can’t get out of your head?

“And I’ve made my mind up, you’re going to be mine!” Donovan, “Sunshine Superman.”

What band or artist changed your life? How?

Pink Floyd. I remember hearing them for the first time and having this overwhelming desire to find out how and why they did what they do. Still figuring that out to this day.

You have one question to ask one musician. What’s the question, and who are you asking?

I’d ask R. Kelly why he’s such a genius.

What song would you like played at your funeral?

My band can pick that one. They know me best.

Figurative gun to your head, what is your favorite album of all time?

Lonerism by Tame Impala. These guys are way ahead of our time, or maybe way behind in the best way. All the tones are there; the lyrics are relevant; and the musicianship is unmatched. Best band playing right now.

What song should everyone listen to right now?

“Low Light,” War Drum. (Scroll down to hear it.)

Published in The Lucky 13

Of all the Coachella Valley musicians who have walked The Lucky 13 gauntlet so far, Zach Huskey is the most mysterious. The Dali’s Llama vocalist/guitar-player told us his age was “40ish.” His day job? “Sorry, that’s classified.” Where does he live? “The desert.” Catch the man of mystery and his heavy-rock band mates at 9:30 p.m., this Saturday, March 9, for a “heavy night of music” at The Hood Bar and Pizza, 74360 Highway 111 in Palm Desert. Admission is free; the bill also includes the Whores of Tijuana and Lazy Cobra. For more information on the band—which is still celebrating the release of its new album, Autumn Woods—visit www.reverbnation.com/dalisllama.

What was the first concert you attended?

The Plasmatics.

What was the first album you owned?

Neil Young and Crazy Horse, Rust Never Sleeps.

What bands are you listening to right now?

Sleep, Down, Electric Wizard, The Sword, The Damned.

What artist, genre or musical trend does everyone love, but you don’t get?

Rap and new country.

What musical act, current or defunct, would you most like to see perform live?

Jimi Hendrix or Black Sabbath, circa 1972.

What’s your favorite musical guilty pleasure?

Danzig.

What’s your favorite music venue?

The Double Down Saloon in Las Vegas.

What’s the one song lyric you can’t get out of your head?

“She's like heroin to me, she cannot miss a vein,” The Gun Club, “She’s Like Heroin to Me.”

What band or artist changed your life? How?

The Who’s Live at Leeds. Power and brains.

You have one question to ask one musician. What’s the question, and who are you asking?

I'd ask Lemmy if I could have a blood sample.

What song would you like played at your funeral?

“Resolved” by Dali's Llama.

Figurative gun to your head, what is your favorite album of all time?

Machine Head, Deep Purple.

What song should everyone listen to right now?

"Bad Dreams" by Dali's Llama. (Scroll down to check out the video.)

Published in The Lucky 13

When he’s not playing bass for reggae band Tribe-O, Palm Springs native Michael Gardner works as a sales associate at a local health-food store. The Palm Desert resident is also a husband, and a proud father of a 1-year-old. Celebrate the late Bob Marley’s birthday (a few days belatedly) with Tribe-O at 9:30 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 9, at The Hood Bar and Pizza, 74360 Highway 111 in Palm Desert. Admission is free; check out Tribe-O on Facebook for more information.

What was the first concert you attended?

Lollapalooza ’97. Such an epic lineup, now that I look back.

What was the first album you owned?

Beastie Boys, Licensed to Ill.

What bands are you listening to right now?

Karmic Basis, Inna Vision, Zincfence Band, and Protoje

What artist, genre or musical trend does everyone love, but you don’t get?

Country.

What musical act, current or defunct, would you most like to see perform live?

Black Uhuru with Mykal Rose and Sly and Robbie.

What’s your favorite musical guilty pleasure?

Bruno Mars.

What’s your favorite music venue?

The Belly Up, Solana Beach.

What’s the one song lyric you can’t get out of your head?

“One good thing about music, when it hits you feel no pain,” "Trenchtown Rock" by Bob Marley.

What band or artist changed your life? How?

Ras Rebel brought me out from the garage sessions and up on the stage. (He gave me) inspiration to take a hobby and turn it into a passion and way of life.

You have one question to ask one musician. What’s the question, and who are you asking?

Asking Robbie Shakespeare: What is your process for creating such amazing bass lines?

What song would you like played at your funeral?

Bob Marley, “Forever Loving Jah.”

Figurative gun to your head, what is your favorite album of all time?

Bob Marley, Legend.

What song should everyone listen to right now?

Jah Meek featuring Luciano, “Everything Is Possible.” (Scroll down to listen.)

Published in The Lucky 13

The Butchery Boys’ Marcus Bush (aka Marco D’Beast), 27, is one busy dude. By day, he installs Murphy beds; by night, he cooks at The Hood Bar and Pizza. The Palm Desert resident and his psychobilly bandmates will be releasing a six-song EP, USDA Condemned, this spring; watch for updates on a release show by following the band on their Facebook page.

What was the first concert you attended?

I can't remember, ha ha. Probably my uncle’s band, RedRum, when I was a wee lad.

What was the first album you owned?

Billy Idol, Rebel Yell, on vinyl.

What bands are you listening to right now?

Every Time I Die, He Is Legend, Between the Buried and Me, The Devil Makes Three, Koffin Kats, Propagandhi, August Burns Red, Mad Sin—usually something different every day.

What artist, genre or musical trend does everyone love, but you don’t get?

Dub step. I'm not one to bash anyone's musical taste, I just don't understand the monotony.

What musical act, current or defunct, would you most like to see perform live?

It would be awesome to see Sikth reunite.

What’s your favorite musical guilty pleasure?

Although I have a lot of them, Cradle of Filth, I'd say, is the most favorite. I just grew up on it and at one point had every album. One that I don't usually admit to is old Blink-182. Ha ha.

What’s your favorite music venue?

Growing up, I was extremely fond of the (defunct) Showcase Theatre in Corona. Now it is definitely The Hood, not only because I work there, but because it's a small, intimate venue where some really good shows have gone on in the past year or so.

What’s the one song lyric you can’t get out of your head?

There are a ton of them, but I always find me and my co-workers singing “Saturday Night” by the Misfits.

What band or artist changed your life? How?

Between the Buried and Me and their drummer, Blake Richardson. After hearing about them, I developed a whole new world of inspiration. Although their style of music is very different from what I typically play, it helped me to understand how to mash together multiple styles of music and the importance in tasteful transitions.

You have one question to ask one musician. What’s the question, and who are you asking?

I would probably ask Glenn Danzig if he would sign my fishnet shirts, ha ha.

What song would you like played at your funeral?

Christina Aguilera, "Genie in a Bottle." (Don't ask, ha ha.)

Figurative gun to your head, what is your favorite album of all time?

Lagwagon, Trashed.

What song should everyone listen to right now?

"The Plank" by The Devil Makes Three. (Scroll down to listen.)

Published in The Lucky 13

By day, Palm Desert resident Daniel Wheat, 28, works in pest control. By night, Wheat plays bass and sings backup vocals in “anthemic pop punk-esque rock” band Boycott Radio, and “melodic death metal” band Remnants of Man. Catch Boycott Radio as part of “Bar-Nival” at 9 p.m., Friday, Jan. 18, at the Hood Bar and Pizza, 74360 Highway 111 in Palm Desert. Admission is free, but please bring donations for two causes. According to the folks at the Hood, “Half of the money raised will go to fund supplies for an after-school arts literacy program that integrates creative writing, art, music and drama for elementary school children throughout the Coachella Valley. The other half of the donations will be used to create 'homeless care packages' in order to help those without adequate housing get through these next few winter months." For more information on the show, call the Hood at 636-5220, or visit thehoodbar.com. For more info on Boycott Radio, visit www.facebook.com/boycottradio.

What was the first concert you attended?

Good Riddance, Dead Kennedys and Strung Out at the Orange Show in San Bernardino.

What was the first album you owned?

The first album I ever bought with my own money was Green Day, Dookie. I was in fourth-grade. My mom hated it (lyrically), so I had to hide it. The first was ever given was Michael Jackson, Bad. I was 5, I think.

What bands are you listening to right now?

Bracket, Coheed and Cambria, Sky Eats Airplane, Atmosphere, and Belvedere.

What artist, genre or musical trend does everyone love, but you don’t get?

Anything with Auto-Tune. Just don't get me started.

What musical act, current or defunct, would you most like to see perform live?

The Dillinger Escape Plan. I've seen them before, and, by far, it was the best set I've ever seen. Pretty much a re-birthing experience.

What’s your favorite musical guilty pleasure?

Dubstep. I don't know why.

What’s your favorite music venue?

The first that comes to mind is the El Rey Theatre in Los Angeles. Went there last year on a solo mission, and it was fantastic.

What’s the one song lyric you can’t get out of your head?

"But you forget that in your fairy tale, bitch, I'm the wolf. All this attention got you thinking you were a queen. You thought that everything in life you want should be free, but nothing is what you think," The Dillinger Escape Plan’s "Black Bubblegum." A bit dark, I know, but so meaningful to me.

What band or artist changed your life? How?

NOFX. Fat Mike was the first person who made me want to play bass. He was doing it differently than anyone (that I had heard at the time) in the punk scene back then. I was given my first NOFX album (So Long and Thanks for All the Shoes), and shortly after, got my first bass.

You have one question to ask one musician. What’s the question, and who are you asking?

Victor Wooten: “What the hell, man? Who'd you sell your soul to? Because the devil couldn't make you THAT amazing.”

What song would you like played at your funeral?

Victor Wooten, "The Vision."

Figurative gun to your head, what is your favorite album of all time?

A Wilhelm Scream, Ruiner.

What song should everyone listen to right now?

CB4, "I'm Black Ya'll.” Hahahahaha!! (Scroll down to hear it.)

Published in The Lucky 13

His real name is Philip Maag, and the Cathedral City resident works in agricultural sales for his day job—but area music fans know him as Philvis, the lead vocalist (who also handles guitar, blues harp and ukulele) for The Deadbeat Daddies. Catch the Daddies at 8 p.m., Saturday, Jan. 5—just as you can every first Saturday—at The Hood Bar and Pizza, 74360 Highway 111 in Palm Desert. There's no cover, and the Daddies will be joined by The Buzz Jumpers. Check out The Deadbeat Daddies' Facebook page for more info.

What was the first concert you attended?

The Doobie Brothers.

What was the first album you owned?

Led Zeppelin II.

What band or bands are you listening to right now?

JD McPherson.

What artist, genre or musical trend does everyone love, but you don’t get?

Rap.

What musical act, current or defunct, would you most like to see perform live?

Janis Martin.

What’s your favorite musical guilty pleasure?

Writing music.

What’s your favorite music venue?

Irvine Meadows (now known as the Verizon Wireless Amphitheatre in Irvine, Calif.).

What’s the one song lyric you can’t get out of your head?

"I'm gonna shadow my baby. ... Find out where my money goes," from "Shadow My Baby" by Glenn Barber.

What band or artist changed your life? How?

Elvis and Led Zeppelin, as they introduced me to rockabilly.

You have one question to ask one musician. What’s the question, and who are you asking?

Buddy Holly: Where did he get his sound and ideas from? They were different and fresh for the time.

What song would you like played at your funeral?

"Sleep Walk," Santo and Johnny.

Figurative gun to your head, what is your favorite album of all time?

Led Zeppelin II.

What song should everyone listen to right now?

Our new original, "Livin' Doll."

Published in The Lucky 13

Page 12 of 12