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Way back in 1992, several states and Canada attempted to boycott or outright ban the sale of Eclipse’s “True Crime” trading-card series, a hot-selling item depicting notorious serial killers instead of baseball players, replete with artful portraits and murder stats. In pre-Internet days, this was an outrage.

Fast-forward 20 years later: People can’t get enough of serial killers—books, podcasts, Etsy subcategories (go ahead, search it) and, of course, TV series. Movies? Not so much, because you can’t spell “serialization” without “serial”: Only so many murder victims can be squeezed into a two-hour flick, but a six-to-13-hour serialized TV show? Now we’re talkin’ respectable body counts.

Here are eight of the best serial-killer TV shows currently available in the streamverse (“all killer, no filler” setup not included—you’re welcome):

Mindhunter (Season 1 on Netflix): FBI agents Holden Ford (Jonathon Groff) and Bill Tench (Holt McCallany) team up with psychology professor Wendy Carr (Anna Torv) to learn from incarcerated murderers how to profile future serial killers—it’s 1977; this isn’t a thing yet. The individual backstories and character quirks are slowly unveiled over 10 episodes featuring the trio kicking against skeptical Bureau pricks with their “egghead” approach, but it’s the killers themselves who steal the show. Particularly, Edmund Kemper (Cameron Britton) is such an intelligent, amiable nerd that it’s almost easy to overlook that he decapitated his own mother and had sex with her severed skull. (“Head” joke goes here.) Producer/director David Fincher lends Mindhunter a tense, cinematic sheen, but he should can his music director. (Talking Heads’ “Psycho Killer”? Really?)

The Killing (Seasons 1-4 on Netflix): Based on Danish TV series The Crime, The Killing debuted on AMC in 2011, back when the cable network was still trying to figure out how to blow all of its new Walking Dead money—turns out dark prestige crime dramas were not the way to go. As the title implies, The Killing initially followed a single case of a teenage girl’s murder, but the murder count eventually escalated—we’re still more-or-less in serial-killer territory here, so relax. Seattle Police Det. Sarah Linden (Mireille Enos) is wholly unique in the cop-show genre in that she’s a real, three-dimensional person, not a “troubled genius”; likewise, The Killing is a slow, slow burn that subverts the episodic payoffs of Law and Order-type series in favor of a moody long game. (Maybe a little too long: Season 4, which went straight to Netflix, was unnecessary.)

The Fall (Seasons 1-3 on Netflix): Yes, Jamie Dornan was terrible in Fifty Shades of Grey, but to be fair, everyone was terrible in Fifty Shades of Grey … I mean, never saw it. In British series The Fall, he’s Belfast family man Paul Spector, a serial killer who stalks, strangles and then stages women after cleaning them and painting their nails—other than the whole murder thing, he’s almost boyfriend material. He meets his match in Det. Stella Gibson (Gillian Anderson), who discerns his identity early on, setting up a tense, quasi-sexy twist on the psychological thriller. Dornan is effectively deadly-dreamy, but Anderson’s zero-bullshit woman-on-a-mission is the real draw here. (After this, it’s easy to see why she doesn’t want to go back to playing second fiddle on The X-Files.) The Fall wraps tidily at 17 episodes total, with little fat or filler.

Marcella (Season 1 on Netflix): If The Fall is the gold standard of contemporary British crime dramas, 2016’s Marcella takes the silver—but it’s still deeper than most American cop shows. (God, I’m such a hipster.) This one comes from producer/writer/director Hans Rosenfeldt (who created FX’s late, great The Bridge—another murder-y thriller), with Anna Friel (Pushing Daisies, The Girlfriend Experience) in the title role as a troubled London detective pulled back into the case of a suddenly-active-again serial killer. Marcella also has 99 problems: Her husband (Nicholas Pinnock) has just left her for a younger woman at his legal firm; said woman is among the killer's latest victims; Marcella suffers from rage blackouts from which she sometimes awakens covered in blood (!). Friel is fantastic; Season 2 arrives later this year.

Hannibal (Seasons 1-3 on Amazon Prime): This actually aired on primetime broadcast network television—though some NBC affiliates opted to pre-empt it after they finally figured out that Hannibal, based on not-at-all-obscure film The Silence of the Lambs, was about a serial-killing cannibal. And a dandy one, at that: Lead Mads Mikkelsen so artfully and lovingly crafts human-based dishes, an argument could be made for giving him his own Food Network show. Likewise, producer Bryan Fuller—who went on to realize, then abandon, American Gods—uses gorgeously gory imagery and psychological density that somehow thrived within standard TV constraints. Hannibal is a prequel, chronicling his pre-Lambs days assisting the FBI in tracking like-minded (but, of course, inferior) serial killers. A 39-episode work of pure art.

True Detective (Seasons 1-2 on HBO Now): In True Detective, creator/writer Nic Pizzolatto envisioned an anthology series that would introduce new plots and casts in subsequent seasons—and he screwed himself by producing an incredible first run, with stars Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson turning in some of their most memorable performances ever. The two play disparate detectives (Harrelson’s Martin Hart is a linear-thinking traditionalist; McConaughey’s Rust Cohle is hyper-smart profiler who monologues about the futility of existence) investigating an occult-style murder in 1995 Louisiana. The twist: The two are telling the story from their own viewpoints in the present, being interviewed by police about a similar recent killing. And don’t believe the haters about Season 2: It holds up … just not quite as well.

Bates Motel (Seasons 1-5 on Netflix): The origin story of young Norman Bates (played to maximum creep-out effect by Freddie Highmore) doesn’t quite end where you think it will, knowing Psycho lore, but the journey is profoundly N-U-T-S. Norman loves his mother, Norma (Vera Farmiga, who was rightfully nominated for all the awards for her fiercely protective/alluringly unhinged portrayal). Like, really, really, really loves her—we’re talking Lannister-level “Incest Is Best” fan fiction. He also has blackout-and-kill episodes, not to mention the occasional tendency to become Norma, posh vintage dresses and all. Thing is, you genuinely feel for the kid, and Bates Motel’s other surprisingly fleshed-out characters as well. Even when going off the rails, the series maintains its eerie, suspenseful trajectory toward an end you only think you know.

Dexter (Seasons 1-8 on Netflix): The murderer who only takes out murderers—Dexter! Michael C. Hall’s portrayal of self-narrating Miami PD forensics specialist Dexter Morgan swept pop culture when the Showtime series debuted in 2006, and “Dexter” became shorthand for “serial killer.” The more-recent shows on this list make Dexter look like a relative lightweight in comparison, but at the time, it was dark stuff, and Seasons 1-4 are unassailable as great, twisty drama (Season 4, with John Lithgow’s acclaimed Trinity Killer turn, in particular). Dexter had a sly, underlying sense of humor as well: “It’s said there are seven stages of grief. I suppose killing someone with my bare hands in a men’s room was my way of working through the anger stage. Whatever the other six stages are … I don’t have time for them”—that’s comedy. Maybe just skip Seasons 5-8.

Bill Frost talks about television on the TV Tan podcast (BillFrost.tv) and tweets about it at @Bill_Frost.

Published in TV

If you watched the first season HBO’s True Detective, you’re familiar with The Handsome Family’s “Far From Any Road”—it’s the title-sequence song.

That fact marks a career highlight for Chicago husband-and-wife duo of Brett and Rennie Sparks, who have been performing as The Handsome Family for 23 years, recording 10 albums in the process. They’ll be performing at Pappy and Harriet’s on Saturday, Dec. 10.

During a recent phone interview, Rennie Sparks credited the work of Uncle Tupelo for paving their way in the Americana-music world.

“Just about every band there at the time was some kind of version of Americana,” Sparks said. “Chicago is kind of a heartland of music. I think Uncle Tupelo set a template that was good for most of the bands for the next 20 years. … We were always inspired by older things than that—mostly early 20th-century recordings and folk music. Luckily, most American music is inspired by that, so no one really noticed for a while.”

Rennie Sparks said that being in a band with her husband has thankfully not put a strain on their marriage.

“I think it would be harder to be doing this with someone I wasn’t married to,” Sparks said. “I feel much worse for (musicians who) are in bands with their friends and leave their loved ones behind. If I’m going to have to do this—and music careers these days require a lot of traveling—why not travel with someone you love? It makes it easier.”

The Handsome Family’s latest album, Unseen, was released back in September. Sparks said that with every album, it feels like the songwriting process becomes harder.

“The first record is always things you want to say that you’ve never said before,” she said. “Now it feels like you’re digging deep down into a well that’s pretty used up to begin with. It doesn’t get easier, but it does feel like it becomes more meaningful with each song that you write. It’s a pretty strange gift.”

A few weeks before the interview, Carrot Top Records, the record label The Handsome Family had been with since the beginning, closed due to the turbulence in the music industry. Sparks said that she and her husband financed most of the new record.

“There were never really any resources to begin with,” she said about Carrot Top. “We’ve always recorded at home with our own money, and our label has always been there to help us pay for public relations and manufacturing. But now, Carrot Top Records is gone. This is the first record we’ve done on our own, and we’ve had to pay for everything. But we’ve never had people telling us what to do, which is nice. It makes you feel in control of your musical output.”

Sparks said there’s a certain type of Americana music that she and Brett love.

“I wouldn’t say that I love Americana music, but I love songs, and I love stories,” she said. “If you look in the history of songs and the history of story-based songs, there’s going to be love for Americana. What we really like is what I call pre-Christian magic spells, and old songs sung for important reasons, like singing a song to make spring come back, or songs to make the dark not kill us. Those are the songs I think are important.”

The Handsome Family has toured more in recent years—and touring has become the only source of music income.

“It’s necessary now,” she said. “Before, we did it because it was a nice way to meet fans, and it wasn’t crucial. We had some record sales back then. Now the only way we survive is playing and performing. I’m glad the Internet hasn’t completely replaced the need for live music. Otherwise, we wouldn’t have any source of income.”

Sparks said that “Far From Any Road” being used as the theme for the acclaimed first season of True Detective has been the most fascinating moment of the group’s career.

“It’s certainly been interesting, getting our song from 15 years ago about living in the desert taken out of context and becoming the theme of a show about Louisiana cops,” she said. “That’s been quite interesting. It’s been a surreal feeling to hear that little static beginning of HBO shows and then (seeing) the HBO logo, then hearing your song. It’s a pretty cool feeling.”

If you’ve seen the band in the past, you probably saw just Brett, Rennie and a drum machine. However, Rennie Sparks said they now have two other members currently touring.

“We have a really great band now,” she said. “Before, we were just a duo with a drum machine, and now we’re lucky enough to have found a great percussionist to play with us. We also have a really great multi-instrumentalist playing with us now.”

The Handsome Family will perform at 9 p.m., Saturday, Dec. 10, at Pappy and Harriet’s Pioneertown Palace, 53688 Pioneertown Road, in Pioneertown. Tickets are $15. For tickets or more information, call 760-365-5956, or visit pappyandharriets.com.

Published in Previews

Another Period (Comedy Central): After a meh first episode, Natasha Leggero and Riki Lindhome’s Downton Abbey/Kardashians parody became bolder and funnier (and dirtier) every week. It’s Wet Hot 1902 Summer.

Halt and Catch Fire (AMC): Just ended and most likely canceled, ’80s tech drama Halt and Catch Fire really did catch fire in Season 2 by focusing on its women (Kerry Bishé and Mackenzie Davis, killing it). Maybe just skip the first season.

UnReal (Lifetime): And another female-led powerhouse: UnReal’s behind-the-sordid-scenes drama about a Bachelor-esque “reality” show was brutal, discomfiting and, for all we know, completely accurate. Shiri Appleby and Constance Zimmer FTW.

Wayward Pines (Fox): It was obvious that M. Night Shyamalan’s Wayward Pines meant “limited series” business when it killed off two big-name cast members (no spoilers!) early on. A taut, weird sci-fi conspiracy yarn.

Maron (IFC): No hype, just Marc Maron being Maron in Curb Your Enthusiasm: The Next Generation.

Dark Matter (Syfy): The setup of really, really, really ridiculously good-looking amnesiac fugitives in space didn’t seem sustainable, but Dark Matter rolled out the back-stories (and ass-kicking action) more intelligently than expected.

Killjoys (Syfy): Ditto on the looks and action here, though Killjoys was a bit more complex (read: confusing) and even more low-budget than Dark Matter (which seems impossible). Still, Hannah John-Kamen is the sci-fi heroine to top this summer.

True Detective (HBO): Quit your whining and just watch all eight episodes in a row.

The Brink (HBO): It was sold as a Jack Black comedy, but The Brink (a modern-day Dr. Strangelove via Homeland) belongs to Tim Robbins as the tenacious secretary of state, and Maribeth Monroe as his impossibly loyal assistant.

Mr. Robot (USA): Rami Malek’s mumbling, monologue-ing hoodie-rat hacker isn’t a logical TV hero—which makes Mr. Robot’s Fight Club-meets-The Matrix-meets-Dilbert existence encouraging (especially on a network like USA). Another binge-watch candidate.

Humans (AMC): The biggest surprise from this British import about synthetic “humans” living/serving amongst us? Joe (Tom Goodman-Hill) waited four whole episodes before bedding his nanny-bot (Gemma Chan). Humans was creepy, but with a heart—rare combo.

Extant (CBS): Halle Berry’s alien-takeover thriller is still insane—but at least it’s evolved into decent sci-fi, and new Season 2 co-star Jeffrey Dean Morgan handily replaced what’s-his-name. Bonus: David Morrissey acting even harder than he did on The Walking Dead!

The Spoils Before Dying (IFC): Eric Jonrosh (Will Ferrell) and his lost crime-noir masterpiece somehow made jazz tolerable. That’s an accomplishment.

Rectify (Sundance): So rich, so moving, so … slow. Ray McKinnon’s Southern-gothic character study isn’t for everyone, but the quality of the performances (not limited to main stars Aden Young and Abigail Spencer) are undeniable.

The Strain (FX): Guillermo del Toro and Chuck Hogan’s vampire-invasion thriller kicked into high gear in Season 2, thanks partially to letting Kevin Durand’s badass Fet inject some comic relief into the occasionally too-damned-serious affair. Pretty vamps are so over.

Sex&Drugs&Rock&Roll (FX): Denis Leary’s comic love letter to rock wasn’t groundbreaking by any stretch, but it was loud and fun. That’s rock ’n’ roll, right?

BoJack Horseman (Netflix): You will feel all the feels of a cartoon horse (Will Arnett).

Ray Donovan (Showtime): As if Jon Voight weren’t enough, Liev Schreiber’s titular thug-to-the-stars Ray had to fight for screen-chewing time with new Season 3 guest Ian McShane—and he held his own.

Stitchers (ABC Family): Impossibly pretty 20-something scientists “stitch” into the memories of the recently deceased in CSI: Dead Brains. Sure, it sounds similar to iZombie, but Stitchers was even stoopider—and yet oddly entertaining.

The Meltdown With Jonah and Kumail (Comedy Central): Backstage is sometimes funnier than what’s onstage at the comic-book-store stand-up show; comedians, actors and sometimes even porn stars drop in randomly, adding to the anarchic atmosphere of The Meltdown. So all stand-up shows aren’t like this?

Your Pretty Face Is Going to Hell (Adult Swim): Season 2 of hell as a workplace comedy … not a workplace reality show.

Married (FX): The second season of Nat Faxon and Judy Greer’s domestic comedy may have found a groove, if not viewers. Married is pretty much canceled; proceed at your leisure.

Rick and Morty (Adult Swim): It’s probably best that Community is now dead as a TV show, because Rick and Morty is a far better use of Dan Harmon’s time. There’s not a more off-the-charts science-geeky show out there—sorry, Cosmos—and the funny is relentless.

Wet Hot American Summer (Netflix): First Day of Camp bested the 2001 movie by streamlining the gags and going for ridiculous broke. So how do I get a gig at Rock & Roll World Magazine?

Published in TV

The Daily Show With Jon Stewart (Thursday, Aug. 6, Comedy Central), series finale: Jon Stewart is leaving television much richer with comedic fake news reporting than when he took over The Daily Show from Craig Kilborn (’member him?) in 1999. Now, we have Comedy Central’s own Nightly Show With Larry Wilmore, HBO’s Last Week Tonight With John Oliver, Fox News’ Hannity, er, Greg Gutfeld Show, and others current and canceled (you’re still missed, Onion News Network), but none have the faux gravitas of Stewart. We all got over the loss of The Colbert Report fairly quickly, because we know Stephen Colbert will be back on TV come September as the new host of CBS’ Late Show, but Stewart’s probably going to opt for the quick fade, à la David Letterman (or make more movies like Rosewater… let’s hope for the quick fade). Say goodbye and salute the man who forced all TV news—fake, real and Fox—to up their respective games.

The Comment Section (Friday, Aug. 7, E!), series debut: Of all the ill-conceived half-hours E! has attempted to pair up with long-running hit The Soup, The Comment Section is, well, the latest. After a stretch of failures that includes recent airballs The Grace Helbig Show (not the worst thing E!’s ever run) and New Money (literally the worst thing E!’s ever run), The Soup’s producers took it upon themselves to come up with their own lead-out … and it’s a show about Internet comments. Admittedly, there’s plenty of funny/hateful/inexplicable material out there, but that’s the problem: It’s already out there! To find yourself! There’s no need for a TV show about the Internet! (Notable exception: Comedy Central’s @Midnight.) The concept makes about as much sense as watching a YouTube clip of someone else playing a videogame … OK, never mind.

America’s Next Weatherman (Saturday, Aug. 8, TBS), series debut: For a network dedicated to “Very Funny” comedy, TBS has had little luck producing an original series to complement its endless blocks of old broadcast sitcoms and movies that invariably star Owen Wilson. On the surface, America’s Next Weatherman looks like another desperate TBS future-fail on par with King of the Nerds and anything that isn’t Conan—but wait! ANW is an odd collaboration between reliable comedy platform Funny or Die and reality-show king Mark Burnett, and there’s a new regime at the network that seems more interested in quality than insta-crap. After surviving challenges both professional and ridiculous, as well as the dead-eyed stare of kinda-celebrity-newser Jillian Barberie, the winning weatherperson (both men and women compete, despite the WeatherMAN title) will receive $100k (sweet) and a gig on CNN (oh, so sorry …).

True Detective (Sunday, Aug. 9, HBO), season finale:The majority of complaints about Season 2 of True Detective from pros and civilians alike boil down to: “It’s not exactly like Season 1!” Yes, stars Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson, and then-director Cary Fukunaga, set an impossibly high bar, but creator/writer Nic Pizzolatto and new stars Colin Farrell, Rachel McAdams and Taylor Kitsch have brought serious heat to the anthology series’ second chapter. (For the sake of my own argument, I’m going to conveniently leave out Vince Vaughn and Kelly Reilly.) Try this: Finish your hate-watching tonight; give it a few months; then revisit True Detective S2 during some holiday downtime. If you’re still not impressed, come find me and give me a front-porch beat-down, cool?

Kevin From Work (Wednesday, Aug. 12, ABC Family), series debut: Like TV Land, ABC Family is slowly phasing out multi-camera laugh-tracked sitcoms and going after the audiences who grew up on The Office, Curb Your Enthusiasm and Arrested Development. Kevin From Work is nowhere near as funny as any of those, but at least it’s a step in the right direction away from Melissa and Joey (R.I.P.). The titular Kevin (Noah Reid) is an office drone who, upon the eve of his transfer to another company position overseas, declares his long-secret love/lust for co-worker Audrey (Paige Spara), because he’s outta there—so why not? Transfer falls though; awkwardness ensues. The pluses (McG directs, and Amy Sedaris co-stars) outweigh the minuses (Reid and Spara are boooring), but Kevin From Work is at least as funny as The 700 Club (which ABC Family is contractually bound to run until Pat Robertson is Raptured—true story).

Published in TV

True Detective (Sunday, June 21, HBO), season premiere: How do you top Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson from True Detective’s killer debut season? Double-down on the star power: Besides Colin Farrell and Vince Vaughn, Season 2 also features Rachel McAdams and Taylor Kitsch as co-leads, and the supporting-cast bench isn’t lacking, either. Vaughn is a mob boss looking to go legit; Farrell is a troubled—to put it mildly (he makes McConaughey’s Rust Cohle look like a Walmart greeter)—detective who owes him; Kitsch is a highway patrolman with a past; and McAdams is a hard-as-nails cop written to single-handedly obliterate Season 1’s Weak Female Problem. Season 2 also ditches its predecessor’s supernatural hoodoo and time-jumping plot in favor of a linear, hard-boiled California crime story that doesn’t seem to be leading to Season 1’s “happy” ending. To paraphrase Spinal Tap: How much more bleak could this be? The answer is none. None more bleak. But sooo damned pulp-good.

The Brink (Sunday, June 21, HBO), series debut: After True Detective, some comic relief is needed—so how about the threat of World War III? The Brink stars Jack Black as a low-level State Department hack in Pakistan who is out to score weed with his driver (Aasif Mandvi) when protests break out, and a none-too-stable general (Iqbal Theba) threatens to go nuclear. Back at the White House, the womanizing, boozehound secretary of state (Tim Robbins, stealing the show) attempts to talk the secretary of defense (Geoff Pierson) and the president (Esai Morales) out of striking pre-emptively—as a bomber pilot (Pablo Schreiber, better known as Pornstache from Orange Is the New Black) is already en route. As a Veep-meets-Dr. Strangelove geopolitical comedy, The Brink smartly keeps Black’s we’ve-seen-it idiot from dominating the show, but your faith in government … well, probably won’t change at all.

Ballers (Sunday, June 21, HBO), series debut: Dwayne Johnson has become such a larger-than-life action star that “The Rock” qualifier is irrelevant; casting him as a painkiller-popping ex-NFL star trying to scrape together a post-football life almost feels like a Saturday Night Live sketch. Sure, he’s as charming as ever as Spencer Strasmore, a retired Miami Dolphin transitioning into becoming a financial manager for his fellow money-burning retirees and clueless rookies (or “monetizing friendships,” as his boss, played by Rob Corddry, says)—but a sympathetic underdog? Not happening. Ballers critiques the chew-’em-up-spit-’em-out culture of pro sports almost as much as it revels in the glamour, but Johnson is just too big—in every sense—for his role. Maybe HBO should have called Kenny Powers of Eastbound and Down out of retirement.

UnReal (Mondays, Lifetime), new series: Marti Noxon has contributed to some classic TV series (like Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Mad Men) and created at least one winner (2014’s Girlfriends’ Guide to Divorce), but her new UnReal probably won’t be listed among them—but not for a lack of trying. A drama set behind the scenes of a reality-dating show, UnReal pits a ruthless showrunner who’s not above manipulating anything on the screen for ratings (Constance Zimmer, in her usual ballbuster Constance Zimmer role) against a producer with at least a twinge of conscience and TV-PTSD issues galore (Shiri Appleby). Thing is, no one here is remotely likable (very Showtime, but not very Lifetime), but at least there’s a winking acknowledgement that this brand of “reality” is complete bullshit.

Another Period (Tuesday, June 23, Comedy Central), series debut: The Bellacourt sisters (Natasha Leggero and Riki Lindhome) were the Kardashians of the early 1900s, concerned only with being rich, famous and relatively disease-free. Leggero and Lindhome are two of the funniest comic actors around, and the rest of the cast (including Michael Ian Black, Paget Brewster, Brett Gelman, Christina Hendricks, David Koechner, Jason Ritter and David Wain) is equally impressive. But Another Period is more silly than stellar, like a leftover episode of Drunk History (same director, coincidentally) that wasn’t done cooking yet. It’s nice summer filler behind Inside Amy Schumer, but it likely won’t last any longer than that. Leggero deserves her Big Break—has Season 3 of True Detective been cast yet?

Mr. Robot (Wednesday, June 24, USA), series debut: Vigilante hacker by night/corporate IT drone by day Elliot (Rami Malek) is recruited by the mysterious “Mr. Robot” (Christian Slater), the leader of an “underground hacker group,”  to e-destroy the company that employs Elliot. If you misread the title and were momentarily excited about a series based on the 1983 Styx hit “Mr. Roboto,” apologies.

Published in TV

Hannibal (NBC; Thursday, June 4, season premiere): Hannibal (Mads Mikkelsen) and Bedelia (Gillian Anderson) are hiding out in Europe—but can the doctor keep his “tastes” under the radar? What a bore that show would be.

Sense8 (Netflix; Friday, June 5, series debut): The Wachowski Brothers bring their Matrix-y weirdness to TV in the tale of eight people around the world who can tap into each other’s existences. Coincidentally, they’re all ridiculously good-looking.

Orange Is the New Black (Netflix; Friday, June 12, season premiere): The gang’s all back—and so is Alex (Laura Prepon), as well as new inmate Stella (Ruby Rose). Larry (Jason Biggs), not so much. Please contain your indifference.

Dark Matter (Syfy; Friday, June 12, series debut): The crew of an adrift spaceship wakes up with no memories, and to outside threats galore. Based on the graphic novel (woo!) and produced by the Stargate SG-1 team (uh-oh).

Proof (TNT; Tuesday, June 16, series debut): A brilliant-but-troubled surgeon (Jennifer Beals) is hired by a dying tech billionaire (Matthew Modine) to find proof—get it?—that death is not the end. TNT, maybe, but not death.

The Astronaut Wives Club (ABC; Thursday, June 18, series debut; pic above): Imagine Mad Men, but focused on the spouses of NASA heroes of the late ’60s. That would be a better show than this reheated network leftover—but the fashion is sooo cute!

Complications (USA; Thursday, June 18, series debut): A suburban doctor (Jason O’Mara) becomes embroiled in a gang war after saving the life of a kingpin’s son at a drive-by. From the creators of Burn Notice, so expect plenty of yelling and gunplay.

Killjoys (Syfy; Friday, June 19, series debut): A trio of sexy bounty hunters (Aaron Ashmore, Hannah John-Kamen and Luke Macfarlane) work the interplanetary warzone. It’s Firefly meets Guardians of the Galaxy meets a Canadian budget.

True Detective (HBO; Sunday, June 21, season premiere): Colin Farrell, Vince Vaughn, Rachel McAdams and Taylor Kitsch navigate murder and mustaches in the badlands of California. Hold your “Season 1 was better” critiques until at least after the opening credits.

Ballers (HBO; Sunday, June 21, series debut): A sports dramedy (!) about retired and rookie football players just trying to get by in Miami, starring Dwayne Johnson, Omar Miller and Rob Corddry, and produced by Mark Wahlberg and Peter Berg. Hut!

The Brink (HBO; Sunday, June 21, series debut): Bureaucrats (including Jack Black and Tim Robbins), military hawks (Geoff Pierson) and fighter pilots (Pablo Schreiber) scramble to avert World War III. It’s like Veep with higher stakes and (slightly) less profanity.

Mr. Robot (USA; Wednesday, June 24, series debut): Vigilante hacker by night/corporate IT drone by day Elliot (Rami Malek) is recruited by the mysterious “Mr. Robot” (Christian Slater) to e-destroy the company he works for. Never give up on TV, Slater.

Humans (AMC; Sunday, June 28, series debut): In the “parallel present” of suburban London, the must-have accessory is a “Synth,” a human-like servant/friend. But what happens when the Synths develop emotions? And, since they’re British, how do you tell?

Zoo (CBS; Tuesday, June 30, series debut): Animals are rising up against humans all over the planet, and only a “renegade biologist” (James Wolk) can stop the pandemic. People of Earth: If your lives are in the hands of a “renegade biologist,” you’re boned.

The Strain (FX; Sunday, July 12, season premiere): New York City is being overrun with not-pretty vampires, and it’s up to Eph (Corey Stoll) and Nora (Mia Maestro) to create a cure for the epidemic … if they can keep it in their pants. NYC, you’re also boned.

Sex&Drugs&Rock&Roll (FX; Thursday, July 16, series debut, pic below): A failed ’90s rock band (featuring Denis Leary and John Corbett) gets a second shot at fame with a hot young singer (Elizabeth Gillies). This will be the second-wiggiest FX series after The Americans.

Bojack Horseman (Netflix; Friday, July 17, season premiere): Everybody’s favorite Hollywood horse has-been (voiced by Will Arnett) is back! And so is Todd (Aaron Paul)!

Sharknado 3: Oh Hell No! (Syfy; Wednesday, July 22, movie): The chompstorm hits Washington, D.C.! Ian Ziering and Tara Reid are back! Mark Cuban is the president! Ann Coulter is the VP! Like you needed any more reasons to root for the sharks.

Wet Hot American Summer (Netflix; Friday, July 31, series debut): An eight-episode prequel to the beloved 2001 cinematic classic, all about the first day of summer at Camp Firewood—with all of the cast members anyone cares about! Bring on the short-shorts!

Fear the Walking Dead (AMC; TBA, series debut): A six-episode flashback to the beginning of the zombie apocalypse, set in Los Angeles. No “renegade biologists” involved.

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True Detective (HBO): Creator/writer Nic Pizzolatto probably screwed himself by launching this mesmerizing crime anthology with stars Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson at the top of their respective games. Good luck following up these eight near-perfect episodes.

Banshee (Cinemax): This left-field, visceral mashup of Justified, Twin Peaks and Fight Club went pulp-gonzo harder in Season 2, expanding the world of Banshee, Penn., just enough to introduce even more Amish mobster/Ukrainian thug mayhem. It’s that weird, and that cool.

Shameless (Showtime): Things somehow got worse as they got better for the Gallagher clan in Season 4, with William H. Macy and Emmy Rossum delivering alternately heartbreaking and hilarious performances. This is America’s family.

Justified (FX): Star Timothy Olyphant put his boot down and rescued Justified from becoming entirely the show of Boyd (Walton Goggins) in its fifth and penultimate season, and brought some new colorful characters along for the ride.

Broad City (Comedy Central): Few comedies arrive as fully-realized as Abbi Jacobson and Ilana Glazer’s Broad City (though it did have a head-start as a Web series); their broke Brooklynites are the female flipside of Workaholics, only smarter, funnier and occasionally grosser.

Helix (Syfy): This Arctic Andromeda Strain/Walking Dead hybrid from Ronald D. Moore (Battlestar Galactica) crept up with no big splash, but it did earn a second season for 2015—catch up on Netflix now.

The Americans (FX): Keri Russell and Matthew Rhys continued to out-spy Homeland while still stuck in Cold War 1981, facing down more danger (and wigs) than Carrie and Brody could ever imagine.

Archer (FX): Meanwhile, Archer (code-named Archer Vice) blew up its spy premise and dove face-first into cocaine and country music. Literally.

House of Cards (Netflix): Vice president Frank Underwood (Kevin Spacey) delivered a shocking twist in the first episode of Season 2, and the train didn’t stop a-rollin’ from there. As with actual D.C. politics, it’s best not to think too hard about the machinations en route to the presidency

Fargo (FX): Lorne (Billy Bob Thornton), Lester (Martin Freeman) and Deputy Molly (Allison Tolman) shut down the “You can’t touch that movie” doubters from frame one with this dark, funny adaptation that faltered fewer times than True Detective. Oh, you bet’cha.

From Dusk Till Dawn (El Rey): Another film-to-TV transition that defied the haters, From Dusk Till Dawn expanded the 1996 cult classic into an even crazier, racier 10-episode ride where the definition of “the good guys” is subjective.

Game of Thrones (HBO): Like anyone’s going to make a list without Game of Thrones. Get real.

Silicon Valley (HBO): Mike Judge finally, if not intentionally, created the sequel to Office Space with Silicon Valley, a hysterically profane (and tech-jargoned, at least at first) saga about programmers in waaay over their heads. If only Halt and Catch Fire had been half this much fun.

Veep (HBO): Speaking of profane: VP Selina Meyer (Julia Louis-Dreyfus) and her team continued to fail upward in Season 3, from WTF? to the brink of POTUS. Pray for your country.

Bates Motel (A&E): Murder, drugs, love triangles, commercial zoning disputes—Bates Motel has it all! Norman (Freddie Highmore) became as intriguing as mother Norma (Vera Farmiga) in Season 2, no small feat, as did some of the supporting players. Why wait for Showtime’s Twin Peaks revival? It’s already here.

Mad Men (AMC): Splitting the final season in half was a lousy idea (the Mad Men buzz is pretty much nil at this point), but those first seven episodes provided a course-correcting jolt that should make for a hell of a 2015 finale, whenever that happens (hopefully, not in the ’70s).

Orphan Black (BBC America): See Game of Thrones.

Last Week Tonight With John Oliver (HBO): Sure, it’s a Daily Show knock-off with F-bombs—but those rants! Corporations, media, condiments—suck it! Everything the overblown Newsroom attempted over three seasons, Oliver nailed in 30 minutes.

Legit (FXX): Poor Jim Jefferies. His Louie-like Legit finally got good by the end of its first season, then FX exiled it to the untested FXX for Season 2: no promotion, no viewers, just yelling into a vast, empty room. See what you missed on Netflix (along with Jeffries’ stand-up specials).

Playing House (USA): Jessica St. Clair and Lennon Parham as almost-uncomfortably close BFFs failed on network TV, but found a niche on cable with Playing House, which could be the first series ever to make pregnancy play funny and inclusive.

Parks and Recreation (NBC): While as excellent as ever, Season 6 probably should have been the last (maybe even halfway through), but at least we’ll get a proper sendoff for NBC’s last great Must-See comedy in 2015.

Rick and Morty (Adult Swim): Few “get” Community, but Dan Harmon’s other TV project, the animated, and simultaneously brainy and crude Rick and Morty—imagine Back to the Future with more universes, booze and malicious aliens—clicked immediately on Adult Swim.

Louie (FX): Louis C.K. made us wait two years for a new season, then delivered 14 arty-if-not-always-funny installments of Louie, which were rightfully hailed as “brave,” “experimental” and “mostly free of black T-shirts.”

Maron (IFC): Marc Maron didn’t stray too far from the formula of his debut season in his second go-round—regarding how difficult it is to be Marc Maron, specifically, and a middle-aged white dude with a podcast in general. Still brilliant.

Orange Is the New Black (Netflix): Season 2 leaned more dramatic than comedic, and pulled killer performances from everyone in (and out) of Litchfield Penitentiary. Creator Jenji Kohan is well on her way to achieving the heretofore-thought impossible: Topping her previous series, Weeds.

The Leftovers (HBO): Life sucks when you’re not Raptured, and The Leftovers was the ultimate summer-bummer wallow, not to mention the vehicle that finally made Justin Theroux matter.

Rectify (Sundance): And while we’re on the topic of dramas filmed in Depress-o-Vision … damn.

Longmire (A&E): In its third season, Longmire fully broke away from its Justified Out West trappings and became a gripping, dusty crime drama in its own right. A&E rewarded this creative triumph—and high ratings—with a cancellation notice in order to make way for more Duck Dynasty. Fortunately, Netflix came to the rescue, and Season 4 will be streaming by late 2015. I’m beginning to understand you cable-cutters …

Coming next week: Part 2—even more shows!

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Orange Is the New Black (Friday, June 6, Netflix), season premiere: How badly did Piper (Taylor Schilling) beat down Pennsatucky (Taryn Manning) at the end of Season 1? The bigger, more unexpected question is: Were the two alone at the scene? Orange Is the New Black grew stealthily and deliberately from a pretty-white-girl-goes-to-prison comedy into a racially diverse drama with real tension and consequences during its initial 13 episodes (while still retaining some laughs—this isn’t the female Oz yet); showrunner Jenji Kohan sends Season 2 down a darker path from the outset. (While the first episode is mostly Piper-centric, she’s not the same woman who entered Litchfield Penitentiary last year.) But, it’s not all a downer—two words: cunnilingus contest. Happy binging!

Power (Saturday, June 7, Starz), series debut: Ghost (Omari Hardwick) is a successful-if-unfortunately nicknamed New York City nightclub owner by night, but an even-more-successful drug dealer by … later night? The logistics don’t matter—can he turn his club into more than just a money-laundering front and go straight? Will the far-less-handsome drug-players of the city let him out of the game? Did no one bring up Boardwalk Empire in the Power pitch meetings? Can producer/recurring “actor” 50 Cent hear how hilariously unthreatening his own lispy voice is? No one at Starz bothered to answer, because Power is slicker, flashier and easier to digest than their last Boardwalk knockoff, Magic City. In other words, it’s good enough for Saturday night.

Finding Bigfoot (Sunday, June 8, Animal Planet), season premiere: The first episode of Season 5 (!) of Finding Bigfoot will be the 48th (!!) produced in three years. You know what they haven’t produced? BIGFOOT!

Murder in the First (Monday, June 9, TNT), series premiere: Since TNT seems dead-set on becoming ’90s NBC with wall-to-wall cop/legal dramas broken up by the occasional sci-fi show, it makes sense that genre veteran Steven Bochco would end up here with a tweaked take on his 1995 series Murder One: a single homicide case spanning an entire season. This time, however, he only has to deliver 10 episodes (as opposed to 22), and the cast (led by Taye Diggs and Kathleen Robertson as gorgeous-but-troubled San Francisco detectives) is more manageably sized as well. The case, in which a dickhead Silicon Valley tech CEO (TV and film’s new go-to villain) is connected to a pair of seemingly unrelated murders, is only slightly more twisty than a Rizzoli and Isles assignment, but Murder on the First is still grittier than anything else on TNT at the moment—except for the occasional Castle rerun. Or is it Bones? They’re different shows, right?

Big Smo (Wednesday, June 11, A&E), series debut: After the premiere of the sixth and likely final season of Duck Dynasty—it was fun, and then rabidly homophobic, while it lasted, but we’ve hit that Jersey Shore/Honey Boo Boo wall of indifference, boys—A&E debuts its next great white reality hope, Big Smo. For those unfamiliar with the pop phenomenon of “country rap” (a mashup of country, Southern rock and hip-hop with an explicable number of rhymes for “tailgate of my pickup truck”), Big Smo is a morbidly obese Tennessee hick-hopper whose star is rising as quickly as his cholesterol. His debut album is called Kuntry Livin’; his music is corporately contrived cheese calculated to suck bucks out of blue-collar Wranglers; and he projects the raw intellect of a stunned heifer. Shoehorn all this raw, oozing potential into a cookie-cutter, over-scripted redneck-family reality show and you have … probably a huge hit. Note that I didn’t say fat hit.


DVD ROUNDUP FOR JUNE 10!

Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit

An operative (Chris Pine) in the CIA’s Financial Intelligence Unit (sure, it’s a thing) uncovers a Russian plot to collapse the U.S. economy and flips into action-spy mode to save the day. Shouldn’t this be called Shadow Accountant? (Paramount)

Non-Stop

A U.S. Air Marshal (Liam Neeson) receives a mysterious text demanding $150 million, or a passenger will be killed every 20 minutes, so he flips into action-marshal mode to save the day. Shouldn’t this be called Dead Air? (Universal)

Ray Donovan: Season 1

“Fixer” to the Hollywood rich and famous Ray Donovan (Liev Schreiber) knows how to handle any problem—except his own father (Jon Voight), a career criminal just released from prison. Can this wacky family get it together? Ha! (Showtime)

The Secret Lives of Dorks

When a high-school nerd falls in stalker-lust with a head cheerleader, she sets him up with an equally awkward nerd girl and coaches him on “romance.” (“Always tell a hot girl she’s smart; always tell a smart girl she’s hot.”) Uh, brilliant! (Gaiam)

True Detective: Season 1

Two ex-Louisiana detectives (Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson) are interrogated about a serial-killer case they “solved” in the ‘90s; flashbacks and intense hair/acting ensue. Yes, it is as amazing as the hype says. (HBO)

More New DVD Releases (June 10)

Adult World, Alan Partridge, Bigfoot vs. D.B. Cooper, Cosmos: Season 1, Devil’s Knot, Klondike, Midrange, Murder 101, Resurrection: Season 1, Rizzoli and Isles: Season 4.

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Banshee (Friday, Jan. 10, Cinemax), season premiere: If you haven’t yet seen the first season of Banshee, do so—it’s a 10-episode rush of gonzo-pulp mayhem that defies reason, and yet it somehow still works, like a visceral mash-up of Justified, Twin Peaks, Fight Club and some sexy number you’d see much later in the night on Cinemax. You’d sprain something if you jumped in on Season 2 tonight. Go ahead; The Only TV Column That Matters™ will be here, waiting.

Shameless (Sunday, Jan. 12, Showtime), season premiere: Fiona (Emmy Rossum) and her job may finally have the family “creeping up on the poverty line,” but all is not yet well in Gallagher world: Lip (Jeremy Allen White) is finding college tougher than he thought; Carl (Ethan Cutkosky) and Debbie (Emma Kenney) have become hormonal-teen assholes; Ian (Cameron Monaghan) is still missing; and, even worse, Frank (William H. Macy) has been found and returned—and he’s learned a few … new ways … to get alcohol into his body now that he can’t drink. Four seasons in, Shameless has yet to run out of ways to simultaneously delight and disgust. Once more: Forget Modern Familythis is America’s family.

True Detective (Sunday, Jan. 12, HBO), series debut: Show creator/writer Nic Pizzolatto has set up True Detective as an anthology series that would introduce a new setting and cast every season—so he probably screwed himself by producing such an incredible first run, with stars Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson turning in some of their most intense performances to date. The pair play disparate detectives (Harrelson’s Martin Hart is a linear-thinking traditionalist; McConaughey’s Rust Cohle is hyper-smart profiler with a penchant for unsettling spiels about the futility of existence) investigating an occult-style murder in 1995 Louisiana. The twist is, the two are telling the story from their own viewpoints in 2012, being interviewed by police about a similar recent killing. Even with the time shifts, True Detective is seamless and riveting, more of an extended indie film than a crime series. If you see only one TV show this year, 1. Why are you on this page, snobby? And, 2. Make it True Detective.

Bitten (Monday, Jan. 13, Syfy), series debut: Welcome back to Gorgeous Supernatural Creatures Just Trying to Fit in Mondays, with returning series Lost Girl and Being Human, and new Syfy entry Bitten—for those keeping score, that’s a succubus, a vampire, a ghost and now three werewolves. Bitten stars Laura Vandervoort (Smallville) as a werewolf who’s split acrimoniously from her beardy-man pack to live the “normal” life of an urbanite—who has to strip down and wolf-out in the woods on occasion. Like Lost Girl and Being Human, Bitten looks like it was shot for $1,000 over the weekend in Vancouver, but it doesn’t achieve the deft humor/drama mix of either—so it piles on the sex scenes. Prediction: Hit.

Archer, Chozen (Monday, Jan. 13, FX), season premiere, series debut: As we—and they—learn in the first episode of Season 5, Sterling Archer (H. Jon Benjamin) and the International Secret Intelligence Service have been causing global havoc for years without the sanction of the U.S. government, thus setting up a season-long arc with the on-the-lam spy gang attempting to unload a ton of cocaine before Pam (Amber Nash) ingests it all, because, you know, Archer. Moving the show to Mondays seems like an equally suicidal mission, but at least FX finally has a semi-worthy animated companion in Chozen, the story of a gay white ex-con rapper on a mission; it’s from the minds behind Archer and Eastbound and Down. It’s half-baked, but Chozen is at least good enough to beat off the competition … phrasing.


DVD ROUNDUP FOR JAN. 14!

Army of the Damned

Followed by reality-TV cameras, a police chief (Sully Erna—yes, the singer of Godsmack) and his men battle a small-town zombie outbreak. Also starring rassler Tommy Dreamer, porn star Jasmin St. Claire and … Joey Fatone?! (Screen Media)

Carrie

An outcast high-schooler (Chloë Grace Moretz) with telekinetic powers gets revenge-y at her prom, and the Liberal Media blames it on her religious mother (Julianne Moore). Based on a book, movie and first-person shooter. (MGM)

Riddick

In the third and final (?) installment of the series, Riddick (Vin Diesel) finally decides to get the hell off of the stupid desert planet (good call) and sends a signal to the mercenaries out to capture/kill him (bad call). Oh, and now he has a pet! (Universal)

You’re Next

A gang of ax-wielding killers take a rich family hostage in their home, and it’s up to a 98-pound houseguest (Sharni Vinson) to save everyone from the animal-masked assailants. Surprise! They all die. (Lionsgate)

More New DVD Releases (Jan. 14)

A.C.O.D., Big Sur, Enough Said, Fresh Meat, Fruitvale Station, Gasland Part II, Getting That Girl, How to Make Money Selling Drugs, Lee Daniels’ The Butler, Short Term 12, A Single Shot, The Spectacular Now, 20 Feet From Stardom, Voodoo Possession.

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December—and 2013, really—is pretty much D-U-N done. Here’s what The Only TV Column That Matters™ recommends you look forward to in January 2014:

Community (NBC; Thursday, Jan. 2), season 5 premiere: The Greendale gang returns to save NBC Thursdays. And while we’re being overly optimistic: Six seasons and a movie!

Sex Sent Me to the E.R. (Discovery Fit and Health; Friday, Jan. 3), series debut: Fine. You win, Discovery. Repeats will air on TLC, too.

Killer Women (ABC; Tuesday, Jan 7), series debut: Tricia Helfer stars as a tall ’n’ troubled Texas Ranger who has a “sixth sense” about why the ladies sometimes murder. It usually involves a man. Or Zappos.

Intelligence (CBS; Tuesday, Jan. 7), series debut: Lost’s Josh Holloway is a hunky/stubbly U.S. intelligence operative with a Wi-Fi chip in his brain that allows him to hack online data. Insert virus joke here.

Justified (FX; Tuesday, Jan. 7), season 5 premiere: Marshal Raylan goes up against a new crime family from the Florida swamps, while Boyd gets in deeper with the Detroit mob. Whatever happened to Local First?

Cougar Town (TBS; Tuesday, Jan. 7), season 5 premiere: They’re back. They’re drunk. They’re still pretty damned funny.

American Horror Story: Coven (FX; Wednesday, Jan. 8), winter premiere: An unexpected visit from Stevie Nicks flusters obsessed witch-fan Misty. Aren’t all visits from Stevie Nicks unexpected?

Parks and Recreation (NBC; Thursday, Jan. 9), winter premiere/100th episode: That dozen-viewer bump from Community should get P&R right back on track.

The Spoils of Babylon (IFC; Thursday, Jan. 9), miniseries debut: Kristen Wiig, Will Ferrell, Jessica Alba, Val Kilmer, Tobey Maguire, Haley Joel Osment, Tim Robbins, Michael Sheen and others star in this epic, sweeping comedy of sweeping epic-ness.

Helix (Syfy; Friday, Jan. 10), series debut: The new sci-fi drama from Ronald D. Moore (Battlestar Galactica) is about a disease outbreak that could wipe out mankind—and the deeper conspiracy behind it, because the mankind-wiping-out disease wasn’t enough.

Banshee (Cinemax; Friday, Jan. 10), season 2 premiere: The weirdest series on premium cable (sorry, True Blood) returns with more violence, sex, Amish politics and Ukrainian mob intrigue than ever. See? Weird.

Shameless, House of Lies, Episodes (Showtime; Sunday, Jan. 12), season premieres: The Gallagher clan, the Kaan consultants and Matt LeBlanc are back for Seasons 4, 3 and 3, respectively. Pity the Home Box Office shows that have to go up against this killer lineup.

True Detective (HBO; Sunday, Jan. 12), series debut: OK, well-played, HBO: Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson star as Louisiana detectives who run up against one another over the course of a 17-year murder investigation. It’s followed by the one-hour Season 3 premiere of Girls—game on, Showtime.

Bitten (Syfy; Monday, Jan. 13), series debut: A ridiculously hot werewolf (ridiculously hot Laura Vandervoort) struggles to choose between her new big-city Earth life and her dumb ol’ ancestral world; it follows the season premieres of the equally-conflicted Lost Girl and Being Human.

Archer (FX; Monday, Jan. 13), season 5 premiere: New night, same … Danger Zone!

Chozen (FX; Monday, Jan. 13), series debut: An animated comedy about an ex-con gay white rapper, produced by the Eastbound and Down team. Need I even go on?

The Following (Fox; Sunday, Jan. 19), season 2 premiere: Bereaved Hardy (Kevin Bacon) is on the mend—but will he continue his hunt for presumed-dead serial killer Carroll (James Purefoy)? Well, it’s either that, or 15 episodes of AA meetings.

Wahlburgers (A&E; Wednesday, Jan. 22), series debut: Mark and Donnie Wahlberg help out with their brother Paul’s hamburger joint back home in Boston. This already sounds better than an Entourage movie.


DVD ROUNDUP FOR DEC. 24!

Adventures in the Sin Bin

A shy teen virgin (Michael Seater) lends out his van, the “Sin Bin,” to his pals for sex, all the while dreaming of being with Suzie (Emily Meade). Meanwhile, the director dreams of being Wes Anderson, and Jeff Garlin just hangs out. (Phase 4; released on Dec. 27)

Insidious: Chapter 2

The Lamberts (Rose Byrne and Patrick Wilson) are still haunted by evil spirits, as well as a film studio bent on making at least another billion bucks. Not to be confused with The Conjuring, the director’s other identical 2013 movie. (Sony)

Una Noche

A Havana teen must choose between helping his wrongly accused friend escape the country and reach Miami, more than 90 miles away across the ocean, and staying to protect his sister. This one was definitely filmed in Instagram. (MPI)

More New DVD Releases (Dec. 24)

The Berlin File, Caesar Must Die, Frontline: Hunting the Nightmare Bacteria, Humanity Has Declined: The Complete Collection, More Than Honey, WWE Survivor Series 2013.

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