CVIndependent

Fri10182019

Last updateTue, 18 Sep 2018 1pm

As you drive in the dark to the Joshua Tree Music Festival on Highway 62, you have to look carefully for the right turn. As I tried to enter, I was met by a security person manning a handmade level barrier with the word “Alto” hand-painted on it.

I stopped. Lucky for me, I am bilingual.

This was the 10th year for the fall Joshua Tree Music Festival, which took place Oct. 8-11 at the Joshua Tree Lake Campground. This micro-festival takes place an hour away from the spot where those mega-festivals take place in Indio. With the help of volunteers, this is definitely a DIY affair. Familiar faces were everywhere, helping with everything from food to production to the construction of the grounds.

Gene Avaro Jr. and the Family (which just finished a national tour with RCA recording artist Elle King) provided the soul of the festival: The musical genes of the Evaros were sprinkled all over this fest. On Thursday night, Gene Jr. and the Family performed at the Boogaloo stage and was a crowd favorite. I loved Ronkat Spearmans Katdelic, who funked things up after the Gene Jr. and the Family set. 

The Boogaloo Stage had an excellent lounge that rivals those at the mega-festivals. It came free with the price of admission—and included complimentary beans and rice on Thursday.

On Friday, the Ben Miller Band brought a mishmash of Appalachian style rock that was exceptionally cool. Meanwhile, Brooklyn funk band Turkuaz turned in a well-executed set; imagine an Anglo George Clinton who listened to the Talking Heads on a regular basis.

Although you would think the festival would be packed with psychedelic bands, anyone in attendance would be very pleased with the diversity of music—and the precise set times, which is a rarity these days.

On Saturday, Oakland’s Bang Data was a stand out hip-hop act. Daby Touré brought African fusion to the Indian Cove stage that was awe-inspiring.

You could consider Gene Jr. the emcee of Joshua Tree, as he hosted a variety bands. The Desert Rhythm Project with Gene Evaro Jr. on keys, Bryanna Evaro on bass and Michael Reyes on lead vocals was another example of how the Evaros dominated multiple stages.

Moon Hooch brought EDM with two saxophones and drums; the group was full of energy and had fans dancing during the beat-driven set.

One of my favorites on Sunday was Xavier Rudd and the United Nations, an Aussie band whose heavy reggae tunes were well-received.

It’s a pleasure to be at a fantastic musical happening with no VIP section and no special entrances—just the chance to hang out with joyful individuals who just want to listen to music for the sake of music.

Published in Reviews

While the 2015 Stagecoach headliners are larger than life, there are a lot of other acts you should include in your schedule. Here are our suggestions.


Friday, April 24

Lindsay Lou and the Flatbellys

It’s always a good thing to hear the upright bass and banjo at Stagecoach. Featuring singer-songwriter Lindsay Lou, this folk group has a beautiful sound—and Lindsay Lou can sing.

The Lone Bellow

These days, the term “alt-country” is (over-) used to describe country music that doesn’t fall in with the mainstream. Well, The Lone Bellow is often described as an alt-country band, so take that for what it’s worth. Hailing from Brooklyn, N.Y., this group has some great tunes that are heartfelt—and isn’t afraid to rock.

Steve Earle

Sugarland wrote a song called “Steve Earle” for a reason: The chorus goes “Steve Earle, Steve Earle, please write a song for me.” He’s one of the best songwriters in country music; heck, he’s even written a novel. He’s also a sensible lad who has written a lot of politically themed songs championing left-wing causes. (Check out our interview with him next week here at CVIndependent.com.)

Merle Haggard

The legendary Merle Haggard is one of the champions of the Bakersfield sound—and he has quite an extensive history that includes a stint in prison, making him a true outlaw. While Haggard has written some tunes that have angered some people, such as “Okie From Muskogee,” he’s still mentioned in the same breath as Waylon Jennings, George Jones and Willie Nelson.


Saturday, April 25

Old Salt Union

There’s a touch of bluegrass in this group’s acoustic rock sound. In fact, Old Salt Union was named the Best Bluegrass Band by St. Louis’ Riverfront Times, and the band has toured all across the country. Show up early to take these guys in.

The Cadillac Three

If you’re looking for some Southern rock, The Cadillac Three are your band. The group has even recorded with Dierks Bentley (who is also performing). These guys have a dirty Southern sound that would make Lynyrd Skynyrd proud; listen to their song “I’m Southern.”

ZZ Top

I last saw ZZ Top about 15 years ago when I was living in Cleveland—and I left disappointed. Here’s hoping they’ll put on an epic show at Stagecoach. The beards of Billy Gibbons and Dusty Hill are legendary, and the group reportedly refused millions of dollars from Gillette to shave them. They remarked: “We’d look ugly without them.”


Sunday, April 26

Ben Miller Band

Confession: I’ve been fruitlessly hoping that The Rev. Peyton’s Big Damn Band would be booked at Stagecoach for the past couple of years—but the Ben Miller Band is not a bad consolation prize. Both groups excel with washboards, spoons and a vintage blues sound. These guys should bring the house down on Sunday.

Oak Ridge Boys

In 2013, I had the honor of interviewing Richard Sterban of the Oak Ridge Boys. These guys have stayed relevant for four decades, making great music throughout their career. This is one of the vintage country acts you need to see at Stagecoach.

The Band Perry

The Band Perry, likely to appear on the main stage, is excellent. The group has some hints of bluegrass with a Nashville sound. This family act features Kimberly Perry on vocals—and she has earned her stripes as a powerful voice in Nashville.

Published in Previews