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If you don’t yet know the music of Jennifer Corday, you will soon. The Long Beach native has called Palm Springs home for about six months now, and is playing more and more around town; for example, you can catch her regularly at Oscar’s Café and Bar in Palm Springs, and she’ll be at the Rock Yard at Fantasy Springs on Saturday, May 23, with her full band, Classic Rock Revolution (classicrockrevolution.com). Learn more at jennifercorday.com. Here are her answers to The Lucky 13!

What was the first concert you attended?

A Flock of Seagulls at Bogart’s in Long Beach. But Howard Jones and Bon Jovi at Irvine Meadows were the first big ones!

What was the first album you owned?

Rick Springfield—oh, how I wanted to be Jessie’s Girl. I had a mad crush on Andy Gibb. And AC/DC’s Back in Black, played LOUD.

What bands are you listening to right now?

I’m digging a few songs from the 50 Shades of Grey soundtrack right now: Annie Lennox’s cover of “I Put a Spell on You”—she kills it, almost better than Manson—and “Earned It” from The Weeknd. And Maroon 5; I can never get enough of Adam’s sweet hooks!

What artist, genre or musical trend does everyone love, but you don’t get?

I appreciate just about everything, but I get particularly irritated when a song is on the radio with ridiculously shallow lyrics and no melody to speak of.

What musical act, current or defunct, would you most like to see perform live?

Zeppelin, Joplin and Gaga.

What’s your favorite musical guilty pleasure?

Old Madonna albums. Or new Taylor Swift.

What’s your favorite music venue?

To play: I always dig House of Blues’ sound and lights, but the Rock Yard at Fantasy Springs is a blast. We play on the outdoor stage surrounded by ponds (which always makes rocking out interesting, as one COULD fall in), with a packed crowd rockin’ out under the stars! Let’s not forget Oscar’s, my new favorite Palm Springs local spot which I play regularly.

What’s the one song lyric you can’t get out of your head?

“Your sugar, yes, please. Won’t you come and put it down on me?” Maroon 5, “Sugar.”

What band or artist changed your life? How?

Melissa Etheridge. Gay girl with guitar gets famous, discovered at the local bar! Hey, maybe that could happen to me?

You have one question to ask one musician. What’s the question, and who are you asking?

Kurt Cobain: “Tell me everything.”

What song would you like played at your funeral?

“At Last” by Etta James, because love is really all there is, and how lucky am I that I did find it at last? And then I want to blast something ridiculously fun, like “Rock and Roll All Nite” by Kiss.

Figurative gun to your head, what is your favorite album of all time?

Oh, don’t make me pick one. Bon Jovi’s Slippery When Wet. The Best of Led Zeppelin Disc 2. And more off the radar: Poe’s Haunted is another all-time favorite.

What song should everyone listen to right now?

My new album: Tastiest Licks, a greatest hits collection, packed with 20 songs including several award-winners.

Published in The Lucky 13

Comedy

Gabriel Iglesias

The famously fluffy comedian performs. 8 p.m., Saturday, May 2; and 6 p.m., Sunday, May 3. $45 to $75. The Show at Agua Caliente Casino Resort Spa, 32250 Bob Hope Drive, Rancho Mirage. 888-999-1995; www.hotwatercasino.com.

Film

Arthur Lyons Film Noir Festival

This unique festival features an eclectic mixture of landmark and obscure vintage movies from the classic film noir era. Various times and prices, Thursday, May 14, through Sunday, May 17. Camelot Theatres, 2300 E. Baristo Road, Palm Springs. Arthurlyonsfilmnoir.ning.com.

Music

Dueling Pianos

America’s top dueling-pianos show returns for one night only of energetic song, fun and audience participation by two extremely talented piano performers. What makes this show unique? The audience chooses all the songs. The audience also chooses what not to play and when to stop. 7 p.m., Saturday, May 2. $10. Purple Room, 1900 E. Palm Canyon Drive, Palm Springs. 800-838-3006; purpleroompalmsprings.com

Fantasy Springs Rock Yard Concert Series

At 7:30 p.m., full-throttle rock music fires up, and the live music continues until midnight. Friday, May 1: Tribute to Duran Duran. Saturday, May 2: Tribute to Red Hot Chili Peppers. Saturday, May 9: Tribute to Queen. Friday, May 15: Tribute to ZZ Top. Saturday, May 16: Tribute to Van Halen. Saturday, May 23: Tribute to Prince. Saturday, May 30: Tribute to Guns N’ Roses. Call for other shows. Free. Fantasy Springs Resort Casino, 84245 Indio Springs Parkway, Indio. 888-331-5645; www.fantasyspringsresort.com.

For the Love of Broadway With Carole Cook

Meet a true Broadway star, Carole Cook, of 42nd Street and TV shows The Lucy Show and Here’s Lucy. 7 p.m., Friday and Saturday, May 22 and 23; and 1 p.m., Sunday, May 24. $30. Purple Room, 1900 E. Palm Canyon Drive, Palm Springs. 800-838-3006; purpleroompalmsprings.com.

Grooves at the Westin: Hiroshima

Grammy-nominated Hiroshima creates a musical world all its own. The intoxicating mix of traditional Japanese folk music and instruments interwoven with jazz, R&B, salsa and more has been a pioneering voice in contemporary music since the 1970s. 7 p.m., Saturday, May 16. $45 and up. Westin Mission Hills Golf Resort and Spa, 71333 Dinah Shore Drive, Rancho Mirage. 760-770-2150; www.westinmissionhills.com.

Vanessa Sheldon, Harpist, With PSHS Orchestra

Vanessa Sheldon will perform a variety of solo harp music and the Handel Concerto with the Palm Springs High School Orchestra. Soloists from the high school will also be featured on flute, saxophone and viola. 4 p.m., Sunday, May 10. $15. Palm Desert Community Presbyterian Church, 47321 Highway 74, Palm Desert. 760-861-0350; www.gold2ivory.com.

Special Events

AIDS Assistance Program’s Evening Under The Stars Gala

The 22nd annual Evening Under the Stars gala will feature a performance by music legend Darlene Love, followed by dancing to a high-energy band. Love has had several Billboard hits and was featured in the Academy Award-winning movie Twenty Feet From Stardom. The event includes cocktails, dinner, dancing, and silent and live auctions of extraordinary trips, one-of-a-kind collectibles, marvelous merchandise and more. 5:30 p.m., Saturday, May 9. $395 and up. O’Donnell Golf Club, 301 N. Belardo Road, Palm Springs. 760-325-8481; aidsassistance.org/evening-under-the-stars.php.

Brew at the Zoo

"Save Wildlife One Beer at a Time." Enjoy a sampling of handcrafted beers, food and live entertainment from more than 50 local breweries and restaurants. Proceeds help The Living Desert care for more than 500 animals and 1,600 protected acres, and provide scholarship programs for thousands of visiting school children. 6:30 p.m., Saturday, May 2. $50; $40 members; $125 VIP. The Living Desert, 47900 Portola Ave., Palm Desert. 760-346-5694; www.livingdesert.org/event/brew-at-the-zoo.

Discover Indio Block Party

Join the city of Indio and the Indio Chamber of Commerce to celebrate the 85th anniversary of Indio with a free community block party. Included in the festivities will be a motorcycle show, classic car show, carnival rides, food trucks, barbecue, kids activities, mini-train rides, art installations, live bands and more. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, May 16. Free. Indio Chamber of Commerce, 82921 Indio Blvd., Indio. 760- 347.0676; indiochamber.org.

The Geology of Gold and Silver

This lecture by D.D Trent, a professor emeritus at Citrus College, is part of the Old School House Lecture Series, which started in 1999 and is run in partnership with the Twentynine Palms Historical Society. 7 p.m., Friday, May 8. $5 at the door. Old Schoolhouse Museum, 6760 National Park Drive, Twentynine Palms. 760-367-5535.

Memorial Day Flower Drop and Air Fair

This special day at the Palm Springs Air Museum includes a brief memorial service dedicated to all of our fallen comrades, who paid the ultimate price for our freedoms. In their honor is a fly-by and flower drop of more than 3,000 red and white carnations from a B-25 Mitchell bomber. 1 p.m., Monday, May 25. $16 with discounts. Palm Springs Air Museum, 745 N. Gene Autry Trail, Palm Springs. 760-778-6262; palmspringsairmuseum.org.

Visual Arts

Summoning Ghosts: The Art of Hung Liu

This exhibition of art by prominent Chinese artist Hung Liu features more than 65 works, including 34 large-scale paintings, ephemera (sketch books, photos, informal paintings) and studies from private and public collections from around the world. On display 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Sunday; and noon to 8 p.m., Thursday, through Sunday, May 24. $12.50, with various discounts and free periods. Palm Springs Art Museum, 101 Museum Drive, Palm Springs. 760-322-4800; www.psmuseum.org.

Submit your free arts listings at calendar.artsoasis.org. The listings presented above were all posted on the ArtsOasis calendar, and formatted/edited by Coachella Valley Independent staff. The Independent recommends calling to confirm all events information presented here.

Published in Local Fun

May is here, which means the Coachella Valley is quieter, with less traffic and temperatures starting to rise. However, locals know the truth: The Coachella Valley never sleeps, and there are plenty of great things going on to see and do.

At 1 p.m., Saturday, May 2, the Desert Daze festival will be taking place at the Sunset Ranch Oasis in Mecca. The bill includes Warpaint (right), RJD2, Deap Vally, Minus the Bear and many others. General admission tickets are $55. Sunset Oasis Ranch, 69520 S. Lincoln St., Mecca; desertdaze.org.

The Joshua Tree Music Festival is back, coming Thursday, May 14, through Sunday, May 17 to the Joshua Tree Lake Campground. The Last Internationale, The Floozies, Airtist and many others will be performing. Single-day passes start at $60 to $90; it’s $180 for a four-day pass. Joshua Tree Lake Campground, 2601 Sunfair Road, Joshua Tree; www.joshuatreemusicfestival.com.

Fantasy Springs Resort Casino is rocking into May. At 8 p.m., Saturday, May 9, you’ll be yelling “Timber!” when Pitbull takes the stage. The rapper has racked up a bunch of hits since his career began in 2001; it’s been said on the interwebs that the new formula for a popular song involves collaborating with Pitbull. Tickets are $69 to $129. At 8 p.m., Friday, May 15, you can enjoy some family tradition with Hank Williams Jr. The son of Hank is quite popular with country-music audiences, but in recent years, he’s pissed off a lot of people with his controversial statements—including his former friends at Fox News, whom he scorned in one of his recent songs, “Keep the Change.” Tickets are $49 to $109. At 8 p.m., Saturday, May 23, R. Kelly will be stopping by. It’s no secret that R. Kelly was the subject of a lot of news back in 2002 when a video surfaced of him … um … well, let’s just say it was a dirty video that supposedly showed him with a minor. (He was acquitted of charges, by the way.) Fun fact: R. Kelly was a talented basketball player; he even played in the USBL from 1997 to 1999. Tickets are $49 to $109. Fantasy Springs Resort Casino, 84245 Indio Springs Parkway, Indio; 760-342-5000; www.fantasyspringsresort.com.

Agua Caliente Casino Resort Spa is hosting some events worth mentioning. At 8 p.m., Saturday, May 16, it’ll be a magical night with Kalin and Jinger. This couple has left audiences speechless with their magic show and has enjoyed numerous television appearances. Tickets are $30 to $60. At 8 p.m., Saturday, May 23, you won’t want to miss Lynda Carter. The star of Wonder Woman is also a talented songwriter, as well as a gay-rights activist. She’s sure to impress. Tickets are $25 to $45. At 6 p.m., Sunday, May 31, you will be happy to know Theresa Caputo, the “Long Island Medium,” will be back at The Show. She’s received praise from a large fan base and criticism from figures such as James Randi; in any case, she’s a star: She sold out The Show the last time she was here. Tickets are $85 to $125. The Show at Agua Caliente Casino Resort Spa, 32250 Bob Hope Drive, Rancho Mirage; 888-999-1995; www.hotwatercasino.com.

Spotlight 29 Casino has a couple of events you won’t want to miss. Dwight Yoakam will be performing at 8 p.m., Saturday, May 9. Yoakam is also an accomplished actor who appeared in the movie Sling Blade, with Billy Bob Thornton, as the foul-mouthed, drunken boyfriend, Doyle. Yoakam’s Bakersfield sound is a throwback to the era of Buck Owens, and he’s a master performer. Tickets are $45 to $65. At 7:30 p.m., Saturday, May 16, there will be a Mariachi Festival, featuring Mariachi Sol de Mexico de Jose Hernandez, Graciela Beltrán and Mariachi Reyna de Los Angeles. Tickets are $20 to $40. Spotlight 29 Casino, 46200 Harrison Place, Coachella; 760-775-5566; www.spotlight29.com.

After a packed April, Morongo Casino Resort Spa has at least one must-see show in May. You heard it from a friend who heard it from a friend that at 9 p.m., Friday, May 15, REO Speedwagon will be performing. The ’70s and ’80s were good years for this arena-rock band, and they’re still going strong, having done several tours with Styx and other bands from that period. Tickets are $60 to $70. Morongo Casino Resort Spa, 49500 Seminole Drive, Cabazon; 800-252-4499; www.morongocasinoresort.com.

Pappy and Harriet’s Pioneertown Palace is operating at a slower pace after a crazy round of Coachella-related shows in April. There’s a sold-out Neutral Milk Hotel show taking place in late May. Beyond that, at 7:30 p.m., Thursday, May 7, there will be a performance by Mojave Sky. Mojave Sky is local to the Joshua Tree area and includes Pappy’s security man David Johnson, who plays bass. Admission is free. At 7 p.m., Friday, May 29, there will be another performance at Pappy’s by JD McPherson. McPherson’s vintage rock ’n’ roll sound, combined with a little bit of Americana, has been a hit; he played Stagecoach in 2014. Tickets are $15. Pappy and Harriet’s Pioneertown Palace, 53688 Pioneertown Road, Pioneertown; 760-365-5956; www.pappyandharriets.com.

The Copa in Palm Springs has a special music event coming in May. At 8 p.m., Friday, May 8, songwriter Crystal Bowersox (below) will be performing. She was a runner-up on American Idol in 2010 and is remembered for her struggles during the show with Type 1 Diabetes. Tickets are $25 to $35. Copa, 244 E. Amado Road, Palm Springs; 760-866-0021; www.copapalmsprings.com.

Published in Previews

It’s that time of the year again: Coachella and Stagecoach are here, and things are crazy before the season begins to wind down. Consider April to be last call before the summer heat comes.

I will be throwing my third NestEggg Food Bank Benefit Show, this time at the Coachella Valley Art Scene, at 8 p.m., Saturday, April 4. On the bill: John Robbins, The Rebel Noise, Alchemy and CIVX. There will also be a closing DJ set by Pedro Le Bass. The Rebel Noise and CIVX have recently had to reshape after changes to their lineups—but both bands are back and sound great. There will also be raffle items. Admission is $10, and all proceeds go to the NestEggg Food Bank. Coachella Valley Art Scene, 68571 E. Palm Canyon Drive, Cathedral City; www.thecoachellavalleyartscene.com.

The McCallum Theatre is concluding its season with a couple of great locally focused events. At 8 p.m., Saturday, April 11, the McCallum will host a special anniversary gala for the The Desert Symphony. The gala will be hosted by Jason Alexander of Seinfeld fame. Tickets are $65 to $125. At 6 p.m., Wednesday, April 22, Jewish Family Service of the Desert will be presenting Michael Childers’ production of One Night Only, which features music from the ’60s. Tickets are $75 to $195. McCallum Theatre, 73000 Fred Waring Drive, Palm Desert; 760-340-2787; www.mccallumtheatre.com.

Fantasy Springs Resort Casino will host Marie Osmond at 8 p.m., Saturday, April 4. She performed with her brother Donny under the name “Donny and Marie”; that led to a variety show during the late ’70s. She’s recorded 35-plus albums and has appeared on Broadway. Tickets are $39 to $79. At 8 p.m., Saturday, April 25, Earth, Wind and Fire (first below) will be performing. One of those disco groups that defied “Death to Disco,” EW&F has been inducted into the Rock ’n’ Roll Hall of Fame, earned eight Grammy awards and sold 90 million albums worldwide. Tickets are $49 to $79. Fantasy Springs Resort Casino, 84245 Indio Springs Parkway, Indio; 760-342-5000; www.fantasyspringsresort.com.

The Agua Caliente Casino Resort Spa only has one big music event scheduled in April, but it’s a good one: At 8 p.m., Saturday, April 4, it’ll be time to boogie with Kool and the Gang. Since 1964, the band has sold 70 million albums worldwide. Tickets are $45 to $65. The Show at Agua Caliente Casino Resort Spa, 32250 Bob Hope Drive, Rancho Mirage; 888-999-1995; www.hotwatercasino.com.

Spotlight 29 has a couple of events worth mentioning in April. At 8 p.m., Friday, April 3, you can enjoy a personal evening with Barbara Eden (above right), of I Dream of Jeannie fame. The actress has had an acting career for six decades—and she has a lot of stories to tell. Tickets are $25. At 8 p.m., Saturday, April 18, R&B singer Keith Sweat will be stopping by. With several hit singles in the late ’80s and early ’90s, Sweat became a household name. Tickets are $30 to $45. Spotlight 29 Casino, 46200 Harrison Place, Coachella; 760-775-5566; www.spotlight29.com.

Morongo Casino Resort Spa is the place to be in April. At 9 p.m., Friday, April 3, Lily Tomlin will be performing. She’s as busy as ever, with rumors of a possible 9 to 5 sequel and various television appearances. This is a great time to see her live. Tickets are $49 to $59. You’ll be happy to know Margaret Cho will be returning to the area at 9 p.m., Friday, April 24. The Korean comedienne includes anecdotes from her family and personal issues in her comedy. Just a warning: She can get raunchy. Tickets are $35 to $45. Morongo Casino Resort Spa, 49500 Seminole Drive, Cabazon; 800-252-4499; www.morongocasinoresort.com.

Pappy and Harriet’s Pioneertown Palace looks ready to open the outdoor stage for the spring/summer season, so there are probably some great outdoor shows coming. At 7 p.m., Saturday, April 11, The Evangenitals will be returning to Pappy’s for a free show. If you missed them back in December, don’t miss them again. I can guarantee there will be plenty of laughs. At 7 p.m., Tuesday, April 14, Jenny Lewis will be performing in between Coachella performances. Tickets are $25. At 7 p.m., Thursday, April 16, Jamie xx from The xx will be performing. Tickets are $35 to $45. Pappy and Harriet’s Pioneertown Palace, 53688 Pioneertown Road, Pioneertown; 760-365-5956; www.pappyandharriets.com.

The LED Day Club will be featuring performances during both weekends of Coachella at the Hilton Palm Springs. On Thursday, April 9, Chromeo will be doing a DJ set; on Friday, April 10, Panda Funk will be appearing; on Saturday, April 11, Odesza will be doing a DJ set; on Sunday, April 12, Flosstradamus will be appearing. On Thursday, April 16, CHVRCHES will be doing a DJ set; on Friday, April 17, Porter Robinson will be doing a DJ set; on Saturday, April 18, Skrillex and “friends” will be appearing (that guy has friends?); and on Sunday, April 19, DJ Snake will perform. A four-day pass to the event is $125 per weekend (which is really not bad); day passes vary. Hilton Palm Springs, 400 E. Tahquitz Canyon Way, Palm Springs; leddayclub.frontgatetickets.com.

The Hood Bar and Pizza has a couple of notable events taking place in April. At 6 p.m., Thursday, April 9, Fishbone will be performing at an outdoor show. The Pedestrians, which now features Machin’s David Macias on guitar, will be opening. Tickets are $25 pre-sale and $35 at the door. My suggestion: Get your tickets now! Remember McLovin from Superbad? Or “The Motherfucker” in Kick-Ass? Well, Christopher Mintz-Plasse will be bringing his band Bear on Fire (second below) to The Hood at 9 p.m., Saturday, April 18. Local bands Caxton and War Drum will also be on the bill, and admission is free. The Hood Bar and Pizza, 74360 Highway 111, Palm Desert; 760-636-5220; www.facebook.com/thehoodbar.

Published in Previews

Marie Osmond has recorded numerous albums, been on many television shows, and written a handful of books; now she’s bringing “An Intimate Evening With Marie and Friends” to Fantasy Springs Resort Casino on Saturday, April 4.

Marie Osmond comes from a Mormon family, and was one of nine children. Some of her brothers—she’s the only female among the nine—were teen-pop megastars as The Osmonds. The Osmond family’s musical success was due in large part to their father, George.

“My dad believed in hiring the best and managed our finances,” Osmond said during a recent phone interview. “My dad was a brilliant orchestrator, and he made sure we always worked with the very, very best.”

The family’s success in the music business is well-documented. “There are not many of us who can say we’ve worked consistently in the entertainment business for five decades,” she said. “We’re fortunate to say we’re still relevant.”

Osmond said there were times during her childhood when she wished she could have been doing something else.

“I have a very unique experience as someone who grew up in the entertainment industry. What is normal?” she asked. “My brothers played football with the Jacksons, and Janet (Jackson) and I were the cheerleaders. I could go on with the oddities in my life, but the principle is: We’re all going to go through up and downs through our life. God could care less who we are, but he cares about how we do it.”

Osmond has spoken openly about her struggles with postpartum depression. In 2010, her son Michael committed suicide due to issues related to depression.

“My son struggled his whole life with depression, and he eventually took his life,” she said. “I don’t know if I ever could have understood what my son went through continually if I had not gone through postpartum depression. I don’t care what they call it—depression is depression.”

Osmond explained she’s open about her struggles in hopes of making people feel comfortable asking for help.

“That’s one of the reasons why I’m open with my life,” she said. “The things I do disclose when I talk about postpartum—do you know how many women are ashamed? Women used to be institutionalized for postpartum depression, which is just barbaric to me. It’s one of the reasons why I spoke, because if you can talk about things, you can eliminate that fear that’s attached to it, and you create an open dialogue and bring peace to the situation. We’re all human beings going through life, and no one should feel ashamed for depression. There needs to be compassion and understanding for it.”

Regarding her career, Osmond has been recording new music.

“When you’ve been singing for five decades, you say, ‘Really? An album at your age?’” she said. “I should say age should never define our ability to give back. There are a lot of things that can be said musically when you hit the big 5-0 that could never be expressed any other way. I’m so excited about it, and one of the songs I’ll be doing in the show is a song that I recorded with Marty Roe, the lead singer of Diamond Rio. Marty has one of the most incredible voices.”

Osmond explained the concept behind her tour.

“The show is called ‘An Intimate Evening,’ and it’s the music through my life,” she said. “My brother Donny and I have been in Vegas for about seven years now. … Musically, this is not a Vegas show. This show, I produced it in the sense I’m a New York Times best-selling author; I’m invited to speak quite a bit as a motivational speaker; and I thought it would be really fun to combine my love of writing with my passion of music. I would say it’s a one woman show with music, and it’s an emotional journey that we’ll go on together. Part of the reason I chose the venues I’ll be performing in is because they’re more intimate.”

Osmond said she picked the Palm Springs area in hopes of performing for a multigenerational audience.

“I really like the Palm Springs area. There are multiple age groups out there, and it’s one of the reasons I chose that area,” she said. “My demographic is very diverse. I want to pull in as many people age-wise as possible, because there’s something for every age group in my show.”

“An Intimate Evening With Marie and Friends” takes place at 8 p.m., Saturday, April 4, at Fantasy Springs Resort Casino, 84245 Indio Springs Parkway, in Indio. Tickets are $39 to $79. For tickets or more information, call 800-827-2946, or visit www.fantasyspringsresort.com.

Published in Previews

Despite the absence of Davy Jones and Michael Nesmith, Micky Dolenz and Peter Tork managed to put on an outstanding two-hour performance as The Monkees at Fantasy Springs Resort Casino on Friday night, March 27.

Some of the fans in attendance were in their teens during The Monkees’ rise to fame in the ’60s—but The Monkees have a multigenerational audience, and a good percentage of the crowd consisted of younger folks.

Davy Jones died in 2012, and Michael Nesmith decided not to take part in the current Monkees tour, so Dolenz and Tork were left to carry the show. Before The Monkees took the stage, the video wall in the background played an intro that included footage of the television show, as well as modern-culture references to the group, including clips of the group’s music playing on television shows such as Breaking Bad and Mad Men. Also included: Tork’s cameo on one show during which a fan told him he had a Monkees lunchbox. Tork’s reply: “We never made any money on those things.”

Tork and Dolenz took the stage, and they wasted no time diving into the classics, opening with “Last Train to Clarksville,” “Your Auntie Grizelda” and “She.” Micky Dolenz’s vocals on “She” were almost opera-quality—his vocal range is still intact. The song of the night was “Mary, Mary”; Dolenz and Tork couldn’t have performed it better, and the backing band handled its duties nicely.

Other highlights included Tork’s cover of Tadg Galleran’s “Even White Boys Get the Blues,” and Micky Dolenz’s performance of “Randy Scouse Git,” which he said was about his experiences in the United Kingdom. He joked, “I was told I had a good time.”

The two told a story about how The Monkees were offered “Sugar, Sugar,” which went on to be performed by The Archies; they said they rejected the song in protest for more creative control—and the two then proceeded to perform a slow version of the song. They also performed their mid-1980s hit, “That Was Then, This Is Now,” while showing clips of various periods through their history.

Michael Nesmith was referenced in between numbers at one point, mentioned as their “sometimes partner.” They also paid tribute to the late Davy Jones at the end of the show with “Daydream Believer,” performing as a video played showing Jones dancing by himself with a psychedelic background.  

Before ending their excellent two-hour show with “I’m a Believer,” Micky Dolenz told the audience to go home and tell the “small children” that he sang the tune long before Shrek did.

Scroll down to see more images from the show, from photographer Kevin Fitzgerald.

Setlist

  • Last Train to Clarksville
  • Your Auntie Grizelda
  • She
  • Mary, Mary
  • The Girl I Knew Somewhere
  • I’ll Be Back Upon My Feet
  • For Pete’s Sake
  • Randy Scouse Git
  • Tear the Top Right off My Head
  • Take a Giant Step
  • Sometime in the Morning
  • Papa Gene’s Blues
  • I’ll Spend My Life With You
  • Cuddly Toy
  • DW Washburn
  • No Time
  • Words
  • Low Down
  • Can You Dig It
  • Sugar, Sugar
  • Even White Boys Get the Blues
  • Do I Have to Do This All Over Again
  • That Was Then, This Is Now
  • Daydream Believer
  • Listen to the Band
  • I’m Not Your Stepping Stone
  • Pleasant Valley Sunday
  • I’m a Believer
Published in Reviews

The Monkees were originally a fake band made up for a TV show—but before they knew it, the members were both television stars and pop music idols.

Almost 50 years later, The Monkees are still performing, and on Friday, March 27, members Peter Tork and Micky Dolenz will be performing at Fantasy Springs Resort Casino.

The Monkees first aired in 1966. The vision of Davy Jones, Michael Nesmith, Tork and Dolenz as a struggling rock band was inspired by the Beatles’ A Hard Day’s Night film. During a recent phone interview, Dolenz discussed the hectic schedule the band members faced when the show went on the air.

“Oh boy, fortunately I was only about 21 years old at the time,” Dolenz said with a laugh. “I had a lot of energy, but I’m not sure I could do it these days. It was intense. I had already been in the business for 10 years at that point, and I had a series as a kid, so I was familiar with the process. Those were long days filming a 30-minute sitcom, 10 to 12 hours sometimes. Then I had to go into the studio, and sometimes, I sang two or three lead vocals in one night—and they needed so much material for the show. During the weekends, we’d be rehearsing for the tour. Those couple of years were pretty intense.”

While The Monkees came together as a result of TV producers’ casting, Dolenz said it wasn’t hard to work with the other members.

“I think it’s easier to get along, because you show up one day, and it’s more formal,” he said. “It’s, ‘Hi, my name is Micky, and this is Michael, and you guys are going to be cast in a TV show. Your first call is at 8:30 in the morning, and in wardrobe by 9.’ In that sense, it’s a lot easier, because you start out in square one, and it’s sort of new.

“After years and years of being together, lots of things can happen, and you hear about that all the time—(like) that sort of feud between a couple of actors on Star Trek. … I can’t speak for the other guys, but I always approached it as I was an actor/singer/entertainer, and I was cast into a show, much like I’ve been cast into musicals recently. I played the wacky drummer on the television show, and The Monkees was an imaginary group. It really didn’t exist. … We didn’t all live in a beach house together.”

In 1967, The Monkees’ members won their creative freedom and began to write their own material.

“We had the control, and sometimes, I think we didn’t know what to do with it, but the sessions were a lot of fun and intense, because there was a lot riding on it,” Dolenz said. “I just remember loving being more and more involved in it. But it was a lot tougher, and it meant a whole lot more responsibility, but I still remember it being a lot of fun, and being more intimately involved in the process.”

One rather amusing story: The Monkees once had Jimi Hendrix on tour as the opening act. Monkees fans were not impressed with Hendrix at all, and Hendrix eventually left the tour, because he was finally seeing success on his own.

“It was pretty obvious back then what he would become. It was also pretty obvious what an incredible talent he was,” Dolenz said. “I had seen him at the Monterey Pop Festival, and I had suggested to the producers that they look at him as an opening act, because he was very theatrical, and that was a persona he was portraying onstage. I remember just seeing him at Monterey, thinking, ‘Now that’s a great act!’”

One of the more fascinating moments for The Monkees came when they were offered the chance to make a full-length film, which went on to become Head. The film was produced by Jack Nicholson and directed by Bob Rafelson; it had no plot and featured strange sequences with each of the members. The film was not only a flop; it alienated many Monkees fans. The film has since gained a cult following and was released in 2010 by the Criterion Collection as part of the America Lost and Found: The BBS Story box set.

“You always hope that something will be successful, but in retrospect, it probably wasn’t the kind of movie the fans were expecting,” Dolenz recalled. “But we had made a conscious choice. The consensus was we didn’t want to do a 90-minute version of the show, which commercially would have been the correct thing to do. At the time, the attitide was we wanted to stretch our wings a bit and do things and say things we weren’t able to do on the television show … and when you do a film, that’s not a problem. We all wanted to make a statement and do something kind of crazy, and we certainly did. I love it, and I’ve always thought it’s a great movie.”

The Monkees have been off and on since their initial split in 1971. In the mid-’80s, MTV ran a marathon of The Monkees TV show that introduced the band to a new generation of fans. During the mid-’90s, the group had a cameo in The Brady Bunch Movie. In 2010, the Monkees reunited again—and shortly after a reunion tour, Davy Jones passed away due to a heart attack, in 2012. Shortly thereafter, Michael Nesmith, who was hesitant to take part in past reunions, finally agreed to appear with the other members. While Tork and Dolenz are the only members performing on this tour, Dolenz said the door is always open for Nesmith.

“Frankly, my understanding is he’s writing a new book and has since decided he really wants to focus on that,” Dolenz said. “He has written a couple of books in the past, and Mike has drifted in and out through the years, but he’s always welcome. He’s a little bit like Neil Young with Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young.”

The Monkees will perform at 8 p.m., Friday, March 27, at the Fantasy Springs Resort Casino, 84245 Indio Springs Parkway, in Indio. Tickets are $29 to $59. For tickets or more information, call 760-342-5000, or visit www.fantasyspringsresort.com.

Published in Previews

Ne-Yo first hit the charts in 2006 with his hit single “So Sick”—and ever since, every album he’s released has hit the Top 10. A lot of people know that.

A lot of people don’t know he’s also a talented and acclaimed songwriter who has penned hits for Mary J. Blige, Beyonce and many others.

Ne-Yo will be performing at Fantasy Springs on Saturday, March 14.

Ne-Yo (Shaffer Smith) was born in Camden, Ark.; his mother was from Arkansas, and his father was from Nevada. His parents, both musicians, split up when he was young, and he was raised by his mother in Camden before they eventually moved to Las Vegas.

“There wasn’t a whole lot that was going on out there (in Camden),” Ne-Yo said during a recent phone interview. “It was the skating rink or the parking lot of the post office where the young people hung out, and that was pretty much it.”

Music runs in his family, he said.

“My mom sings; my dad sings; my aunts and uncles—everyone does it,” he said. “I guess it was hereditary.”

However, that doesn’t mean he’s always been confident in his singing abilities.

“I didn’t like my voice, because I didn’t sound like the kind of heavy-voiced artists that my mom used to listen to,” he said. “It was my mom who introduced me to Michael Jackson and Stevie Wonder and how they sang. It helped me get a little bit more comfortable with my own voice. The first artist where I was really in love with music (was) Michael Jackson.”

He used a journal while growing up—which helped develop his songwriting abilities.

“I was kind of a pent-up kid, and I was aggravated and irritated,” he said. “My dad headed out really early, so it was just my mom, my sister and my grandmother. I didn’t have much of a male role model to vent all this aggravation to. My mom gave me a pen and a pad and told me, ‘Write it down.’ Journal entries became poetry, and poetry eventually became transformed into songs.”

While he’s written hits for himself and others, he said he hasn’t written his best song yet.

“I feel like with every song that I write, I grow a little bit,” he said. “I get a little better at what I’m doing, and as far as my best song, I don’t know what it is yet.”

Ne-Yo has worked with numerous artists, and he admitted that he has some favorites.

“Rihanna and I always have a lot of fun,” he said. “… I just love that she’s so honest. She’s all killer and no filler. She makes up her own mind and makes no apologies for it. … With her it’s, ‘This is how it is; this is how I feel, and take it or leave it.’

“I haven’t worked in Beyonce for a while, but she’s super-sweet and the nicest person on the planet. Despite the fact she’s a megastar, she’s just regular people and really down to earth. She has an untouchable thing that you feel  … but she’s the kind of person who would get up and go to the kitchen and get you a glass of water if you asked her to.”

In January, Ne-Yo released his latest album, which collaborations with artists including Pitbull, Jeezy and David Guetta.

“The album is called Non-Fiction, and I call it that because just about every song is a true story,” he said. “The songs are a story that’s mine, or stories from my fans that I got through social media. As far as the sessions went, I wish I could say I know when I’ve made the hits, but I really don’t. I just do what I feel and let everyone else do the same. “

What can you expect from Ne-Yo’s live show?

“Expect a show that is mainly about the music,” he said. “I’m not really the bells-and-whistles guy. I don’t do a lot with pyrotechnics, special effects and all that. It’s me, a band, dancers—and that’s pretty much it. We have a really good time, and that’s what it’s all about.”

Ne-Yo will perform at 8 p.m., Saturday, March 14, at Fantasy Springs Resort Casino, 84245 Indio Springs Parkway, in Indio. Tickets are $49 to $109. For tickets or more information, call (760) 342-5000, or visit www.fantasyspringsresort.com.

Published in Previews

It’s March … so we all know what’s comin’, weather-wise. We strongly recommend getting out and enjoying some fantastic events before the broiler gets turned on.

The McCallum Theatre’s schedule is full of music events in March. While Johnny Mathis’ March 7 and 8 performances are sold out, here are some other shows to consider: At 8 p.m., Tuesday, March 17, singer-songwriter Don McLean will be stopping by. McLean wrote the 1971 hit single “American Pie,” for which he’s widely known; however, he’s written many other great songs, too. After catching his performance at Stagecoach last year, I can say he’s worth seeing. Tickets are $25 to $65. At 8 p.m., Friday, March 27, Chinese classical pianist Lang Lang will be performing. Tickets are $65 to $125. McCallum Theatre, 73000 Fred Waring Drive, Palm Desert; 760-340-2787; www.mccallumtheatre.com.

Fantasy Springs Resort Casino has some great stuff going on in March. At 8 p.m., Saturday, March 7, Grammy Award-winning singer-songwriter Melissa Etheridge will play. Etheridge won an Academy Award for her song “I Need to Wake Up,” for Al Gore’s documentary An Inconvenient Truth. Tickets are $29 to $59. At 8 p.m., Saturday, March 14, R&B superstar Ne-Yo will be stopping by. Ne-Yo has won multiple Grammy Awards; this is one you don’t want to miss. Tickets are $49 to $109. I was very excited when I heard about the next event … but there’s a twist: At 8 p.m., Friday, March 27, ’60s pop group The Monkees will perform. Here’s the twist: The show is slated to include only Micky Dolenz and Peter Tork. Michael Nesmith, with whom Tork and Dolenz reunited with after the death of Davy Jones in 2012, will for some reason not be taking part in this show, barring a change in plans. Tickets are $29 to $59. Fantasy Springs Resort Casino, 84245 Indio Springs Parkway, Indio; 760-342-5000; www.fantasyspringsresort.com.

Agua Caliente Casino Resort Spa has a couple can’t-miss shows scheduled, too. At 8 p.m., Saturday, March 7, comedian Kathy Griffin will be returning to The Show for what should be a very funny performance. After a successful run with her reality show Kathy Griffin: My Life on the D-List, Griffin is still going strong. Tickets are $65 to $85. At 8 p.m., Saturday, March 28, the ’90s-swing-revival band Big Bad Voodoo Daddy will take the stage. If you don’t remember, swing music enjoyed a very brief comeback in the decade thanks to acts such as the Brian Setzer Orchestra and the Cherry Poppin’ Daddies. Big Bad Voodoo Daddy has continued on successfully since then. Tickets are $40 to $70. The Show at Agua Caliente Casino Resort Spa, 32250 Bob Hope Drive, Rancho Mirage; 888-999-1995; www.hotwatercasino.com.

Spotlight 29 had a strong February—and that strength continues into March. At 8 p.m., Saturday, March 7, you’ll be happy to find a night of “country music without prejudice” with Big and Rich and special guest Cowboy Troy (pictured above right). During the ‘MERICA! years of the previous decade, Kenny Alphin and John Rich rode the charts, and also had several successful collaborations with Cowboy Troy, an African-American artist who does rap country music. Tickets are $80 to $100. At 8 p.m., Saturday, March 28, plus-size comedian Ralphie May will be performing. May was the runner up on the first season of Last Comic Standing. He was also a contestant on Celebrity Fit Club. Tickets are $25 to $35. Spotlight 29 Casino, 46200 Harrison Place, Coachella; 760-775-5566; www.spotlight29.com.

Morongo Casino Resort Spa has one event in March that leads to this question: Are you ready to rock? OK, just joking: At 9 p.m., Friday, March 13, Kenny G (pictured below) will be stopping by. That’s right: The smooth-jazz sax man will be performing here! Despite harsh criticism from some of bop-jazz’ notable musicians, Kenny G has captivated audiences while selling millions of records around the world. Haters gonna hate! Tickets are $60 to $70. Morongo Casino Resort Spa, 49500 Seminole Drive, Cabazon; 800-252-4499; www.morongocasinoresort.com.

Pappy and Harriet’s Pioneertown Palace will host some amazing musicians in March. At 8:30 p.m., Saturday, March 14, Dave Catching and Rancho de la Luna will be taking over Pappy’s with performances by Earthlings?, Dinola and Rancho de la Lunatics. Tickets are $10. At 8 p.m., Friday, March 27, there will be a much-anticipated performance by Gang of Four. The English post-punk outfit just released a new album. Tickets are $25. Pappy and Harriet’s Pioneertown Palace, 53688 Pioneertown Road, Pioneertown; 760-365-5956; pappyandharriets.com.

Copa has several interesting events booked for March. At 8 p.m., Friday, March 6 and Saturday, March 7, Copa will be hosting performances by actress Molly Ringwald. Actually, she’s more than just an actress: Ringwald is also a decent vocal jazz singer! Her 2013 album Except Sometimes included a jazz-style cover of the Simple Minds’ “Don’t You (Forget About Me)” from her ’80s film The Breakfast Club. Tickets are $45 to $75. Copa, 244 E. Amado Road, Palm Springs; 760-322-3554; www.coparoomps.com.

Be sure to watch the websites and social-media presences of venues not listed here for newly announced events. Have a great March, everyone!

Published in Previews

Although he’s 88 years old, Tony Bennett is still the consummate showman—a fact he proved at Fantasy Springs on Friday night, Jan. 30.

Before Tony Bennett came out, his daughter, Antonia Bennett, performed for about 20 minutes, singing standards such as “Teach Me Tonight,” “Taking a Chance on Love” and “Always on My Mind.” She dedicated her performance of “Thank Your Lucky Stars” to her father before introducing him.

A vintage audio clip of Frank Sinatra introducing Tony Bennett played before he walked across the stage, waving and smiling. He began with “Watch What Happens,” and then followed with “They All Laughed,” a song that mentions great scientists and inventors who were laughed at before their moments of triumph. During the song, Bennett even offered a bit of a dance move.

Bennett’s voice isn’t as powerful as it once was, although his power and range are still strong enough, as he showed during “Maybe This Time.” During a performance of Gershwin’s “I Got Rhythm,” he pointed out his drummer, Harold Jones; Bennett said Jones was “Count Basie’s favorite drummer.”

Bennett invited Antonia to return to perform Stephen Sondheim’s “Old Friends” with him. The result was beautiful; they hit the harmonies perfectly.

“Steppin’ Out With My Baby,” “But Beautiful” and “The Best Is Yet to Come” were all delights that showed off the talents of his backing band. Gary Sargent, his guitarist, played beautiful jazz solos and showed off a lovely sound that fit in nicely with all of Bennett’s standards. Mike Renzi, Bennett’s pianist (who also worked with the late Mel Torme and many others), also showed off his individual talents at times. Bennett pointed out singer Jack Jones, who attended the show and stood up when Bennett mentioned him.

After “Boulevard of Broken Dreams,” Bennett mentioned his most recent recording, an album with Lady Gaga called Cheek to Cheek. “In case you’re wondering why, she needed the money,” he said—in a tone that didn't sound like he was joking. The remark got some laughs from the audience—and it was all he said about the album.

The performance lasted more than an hour and, of course, ended with “I Left My Heart in San Francisco.”

Bennett was a pleasure. He still has energy, class and countless fans who enjoy going to his shows and “being old fashioned” with him.

Photos by Kevin Fitzgerald

Published in Reviews