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Tue02192019

Last updateTue, 18 Sep 2018 1pm

Astronomy

31 Jan 2019
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February offers beautiful sights for the unaided eye and the eye aided with binoculars—especially for early risers getting out an hour before sunrise. There’ll be close pairings of the moon with bright Venus just before and after the shortest month of the year—on Jan. 31 and March 2—providing chances to spot Venus in the daytime with binoculars and even the unaided eye. Venus and Saturn will appear just 1.1 degrees apart on Feb. 18. It’ll be worthwhile to watch that pair for changes on several adjacent mornings. Planets at dawn: The pairing of Venus and the crescent moon on Thursday, Jan. 31, will be unusually close and very striking, before dawn and even long after sunrise. From the Coachella Valley, Venus and the center of the moon’s disk will be just 1.5 degrees apart and closing at 5 a.m. Sunrise occurs in Palm Springs at 6:43 a.m., with Venus just…
31 Dec 2018
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6:37 p.m. PST on Sunday, Jan. 20: The moon enters penumbra. The edge of the penumbral shadow will not be noticed, but the moon may seem especially bright then, because the moon most strongly reflects light back toward the source—the sun (and Earth, when the moon is just outside the Earth’s shadow). Look up opposition effect. 7:34 p.m.: Moon enters umbra. The moon begins to enter the dark central core of the Earth’s shadow. How long before this will you first notice the inner penumbral darkening on the moon’s east-southeast edge? How many minutes after first umbral contact will you notice the circular edge of the Earth’s shadow? When will you first notice any color within the shadow? 8:41 p.m.: Total eclipse begins. A few minutes before this time, the almost totally eclipsed moon, with a northwest-north-northwest narrow edge still in sunlight, is likely to be strikingly beautiful. Within the…
31 Dec 2018
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The opening month of 2019 features outstanding sights for the unaided eye, as well as the eye aided with binoculars and telescopes. Who would fail to wonder at the sight of brilliant Venus near a predawn crescent moon? Separated in time by about a month, we have close pairings on Jan. 1 and 31, providing two easy chances to locate Venus in the daytime with the unaided eye and binoculars. Telescopic views reveal Venus’ changing phase, from 48 to 62 percent this month, and its shrinking apparent size as the planet moves from the near side toward the far side of its nearly circular orbit around the sun. Venus in January shines at magnitude -4.6 to -4.3, faded some since its peak in early December, but still at its best for 2019. Rising in a dark sky three hours or more before sun-up, it remains impressive! Another astronomical highlight is…

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