CVIndependent

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Last updateWed, 27 Sep 2017 1pm

With the repeal of marijuana prohibition—at least as far as the state of California is concerned—comes lots of choices for those of us who have not been part of the medical-marijuana community.

Yeah, Attorney Jeff Sessions is still speaking out against marijuana. Luckily, the state is fighting the current presidential administration’s reversal of Obama-era protections for recreational use, so we probably don’t have much to worry about—at least for the moment.

How we ingest recreational pot is just as important as what types of pot we choose to consume. Each method comes with pros and cons—and everyone reacts differently, so take it slow at first. After all, you can always have more pot, but once you’ve ingested it, you can’t have less.

The most common and the easiest way to ingest cannabis is the old-fashioned “smoke up Johnny”—most of us first encountered marijuana by joint, bong hit, or a pipe fashioned out of something like an apple. Partially because of the nostalgia, and partially due to the shared experience, this is still my favorite way to consume “leaf.” It’s simple, effective and easy control the dosage—and to come down if you have been a bit overserved.

Although smoking leaf does come with health risks (yes, smoking’s bad for you!) this low-commitment method is the way many people will probably be consuming pot, at least initially. For about $10, you can buy a small glass, wood, metal or stone pipe. Crumble up some leaf; light it on fire; and inhale. You will feel the effects almost immediately … and you will most likely start coughing. Ignore the old axiom—“If you don’t cough, you don’t get off”—as it only takes about three seconds for your body to absorb the THC. If you’re feeling extra-high after a harsh coughing fit, it’s probably because the coughing deprived your brain of oxygen for too long.

I love a joint, and although you can roll your own, the dispensaries have pre-rolled joints available for sale, either in six packs or individually. A joint is also the most forcibly social method of consumption, because one joint is too much for a person to consume alone. For me, there is nothing better than sitting with some friends and passing a joint around as we discuss the meaning of life, or the latest blockbuster movie.

Many people I know are now vaporizing, or “vaping,” their cannabis. This gives a similar consumption experience to smoking, without many of the detrimental side effects. Vaporizers heat pot to a level that releases the THC and cannabinoids, but not so hot that it actually burns the product; the theory is that the toxins and carcinogens that would normally be released in smoke stay in the product. I say “theory,” because more research is needed to confirm this—and the federal government’s hostility toward marijuana also extends to scientific studies.

There are many different vaping methods, from pens that vaporize marijuana concentrates (upper right) to the PAX, which vaporizes leaf. The manufacturers of the various cartridges have luckily decided to make their connectors universal; this means you can easily buy one of the rechargeable “pen” bases and use a variety of different oils. Personally, I find the “Heavy Hitter” brand to be an excellent product with good flavors and lots of different strain options. These pens are easy to use, produce almost no smell and can provide the social interaction that smoking creates—without the time commitment of a joint. One drawback, at least for me, is that the disposable cartridges create quite a bit of waste, in both packaging and the cartridges themselves. That being said, this has become my primary method for cannabis consumption.

The PAX—some call it the iPhone of vaporizers—is sleek and fairly easy to use, plus it doesn’t create as much waste. Just get favorite leaf strain; grind it up; fill the hopper; and you are good to go. It’s more work than the pens and can be a bit messy, but it is a very good option. Plus, if you save the “spent vapes,” you can use them to make your own pot butter and create your own edibles.

We’ll discuss edibles in a minute … but first, let’s talk tinctures. Oral delivery methods are all the rage, and in terms of avoiding lung problems, this is probably the safest way to consume cannabis; in fact, my previous doctor—who helped write the recreational marijuana bill in the state of Washington—advocated for this method of consumption.

Tinctures contain THC that has been dissolved, usually into alcohol (although vinegar and glycerol can also be used); a few drops are placed under the tongue, and you get an immediate effect without the dangers of smoking. However, this is about as non-social as marijuana use can get, and it has never really resonated with me.

Edibles (below) are another safe way to consume cannabis, and they come in just about every snack form you can imagine. From the well-known brownie to goldfish crackers, and from candy ropes to popcorn, it’s all out there for your consumption pleasure. Cannabis has usually been infused into either olive oil or butter; that is then used to make or coat your favorite foods. Dosage guidelines are included on all edible packaging, but keep in mind that effects may vary depending on your tolerance.

Because edibles need to pass through the digestive system, it can take between 20 and 45 minutes for you to start to feel the effects—if not longer. The danger here is that you may think you aren’t experiencing any effects and take another dose—or that you may consume too much in the first place. Once you have consumed edibles, it is difficult to “sober up” quickly—and the high you get from them is much more full-body and less cerebral than the highs from the other ingestion systems. These two factors can lead to some difficulty if you are not careful. Personally, I don’t use edibles; I’ve had one too many experiences that were simply no fun.

No matter how you choose to ingest marijuana, take it slow at first; do it socially; and have fun.

Published in Cannabis in the CV