CVIndependent

Tue08212018

Last updateWed, 27 Sep 2017 1pm

The 2018 edition of the PGA CareerBuilder Challenge ended late on Sunday, Jan. 21, after four days, four regulation rounds and four sudden-death playoff holes—with Jon Rahm celebrating his second career PGA win, just moments before a dramatic Sunday sunset.

After Day 1, Rahm was in the lead by one shot. At the end of Days 2 and 3, he remained within a few shots of the leader, and came from behind to tie Andrew Landry after 72 holes. Then came sudden death.

In the post-match press conference, the 23-year-old Rahm—the latest in a long line of dominant PGA Tour players from Spain including Seve Ballesteros and Sergio Garcia—described the drama of play on those final sudden-death holes.

“On the first hole, I hit probably one of the best (shots). Actually, each time I played 18, I hit probably one of the best 3-woods I'm going to hit all year,” he said. “(Then, I) hit a great shot to nine feet. … I was really confident I was going to make that putt. I know the break; I know how it was, and I think that the nerves might have gotten the best of me, and pulled it a little bit.”

After two more deadlocked holes, Rahm and Landry came back to the 18th for yet another attempt to anoint a winner. “Once we got back to 18,” Rahm said, “I was really aware that it was going to be probably the last hole that we were going to play today, and I did not want to come back the next day and play it. I was really glad I had the opportunity to putt first. I wanted to putt first, because I felt something in me. I just trusted myself, trusted my stroke and hit (the ball at) a little-bit-below-perfect speed and caught the lip, and (it) went in. I’m sure glad Andrew didn’t make the last putt. But again you got to give props and congrats to Andrew.”

Other notable winners were revealed on Saturday, when sponsor CareerBuilder announced the awarding of 500 scholarships to four Boys and Girls Clubs in the Coachella Valley. The scholarships will enable 125 underprivileged children to enroll at each of the four participating clubs by covering the costs associated with sending a child to one of the clubs for a year. Roughly 80 current members attended the announcement and spent the day learning about the professional commitments from the tour pros, while enjoying the action on the course—as well as on the concert stage, where the Goo Goo Dolls performed.

One young valley resident fell short of his goal Charlie Reiter, the popular Palm Desert High School senior playing in the pro section of the draw courtesy of a sponsor exemption, missed the cut for Sunday’s final round after shooting 5-over par on Saturday.

See more photos from the tournament below.

Published in Snapshot

One of the keys to the success of the big sporting events here in the Coachella Valley is the ability to attract top-notch volunteers. It is a not-so-secret fact that without volunteers, these tournaments would grind to a halt. After all, volunteers are the people work in the trenches and help with everything from parking to general information.

Meet Ellen Roy. She’s an Indian Wells resident who will begin her 20th year of volunteering this week at the local PGA Tour event, now known as the CareerBuilder Challenge, taking place Jan. 19-22. One of Ellen’s jobs is to keep a walking scoreboard, which allows fans to see the tournament leaderboard. The grandmother of four says she does it to help the community—and to meet new people, too.

“I consider many of the volunteers my friends,” she says. “We share the same interest in golf, and I have known some of these people for many years. If you are new to the valley and sitting around feeling lonely, this is a great way to get out of the house and meet some new people.”

Ellen is also competing in PGA Tour Volunteer Challenge. The winner can get up to $10,000 for the charity of their choosing. Roy—along with three other volunteers—is supporting the Boys and Girls Club of Coachella Valley.

“I have been very fortunate in my life, and I want to pay it forward,” she said. “Two of my grandchildren lost their father when they were young, and they spent a lot of time at the Boys and Girls Club, so I know firsthand how valuable the clubs are. They do marvelous work locally, especially in the East Valley.”

People can vote for Ellen’s team—or for the CareerBuilder Challenge volunteers as a whole—at PGATour.com/volunteer.

Steve Kelly can be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Follow him on Twitter @skellynj.

Published in Sports

The Peace in the Streets Global Film Festival offers young people around the world an opportunity to share their experiences and ideas about creating peace—by making films.

Carole Krechman, a 12-year resident of Rancho Mirage, is the driving force behind this transforming project, which is sponsored by her group, The Peacemaker Corps, a non-governmental organization established as a result of Carole’s experience as chairman of the board of the Friends of the United Nations.

Carole took a rather circuitous path to this endeavor. She graduated from Beverly Hills High School and went on to study architecture at UCLA. She spent many years redoing homes for famous people in the entertainment industry (she can drop names with the best of them!) before moving her specialty to roller-skating rinks, and then in the 1990s, to “family entertainment centers” including ice rinks, bowling alleys and so on.

“I’m especially proud of working in the late 1970s to establish the World on Wheels in South Central Los Angeles,” she recalls. “After the Watts riots, there was a need to rebuild the community. We convinced local politicians and the police that we could provide a safe environment for kids to come. We installed metal detectors, and ended up with a place that was safe and self-integrated, where young people could find companionship and community.”

Carole spent nine years working on projects in China, and as a result was asked to join the board of the Friends of the United Nations, a nongovernmental organization. In 1995, she was made chairman of the board.

“That was the year of the 50th anniversary of the UN,” she says, “and our role was to tell the world what was going on at the UN, to disseminate information that would help to build civil society around the world.”

Carole remembers the impact of listening to UN Secretary General Kofi Annan. “He called for a decade of peace and tolerance,” she says, “and the Friends of the UN thought about creating a tolerance award. I left Friends in 1997 and spun off the Peacemaker Corps as a stand-alone NGO specifically focused on young people and those goals.”

Carole was able to secure a grant from Department of Housing and Urban Development and worked in partnership with malls around the country to offer restorative justice programs for youth.

“Our goal has always been to bring people together as colleagues instead of enemies,” she says. “We use education to empower youth to be actively involved in peacemaking in their own communities. When they attend mall events, they can download a free app to participate in global networks and activities.”

The Peace in the Streets Global Film Festival allows young filmmakers to use any technology available to share their own stories. Entries must be no more than five minutes long, and are judged in three categories: age 8 and under, 9-13, and 14-18.

“It hits my heart,” says Carole, “to get a film done on a cell phone from a young boy in a refugee camp, talking about the conditions and expressing his hope for a better life.”

Among the 2015 award winners are two local films made by participants in the Boys and Girls Clubs of the Coachella Valley and Palm Springs. Ashelly Alvarez, of the Boys and Girls Club of Coachella Valley, took second place in the 8 and under category with her film, “Coachella Valley Peace in the Streets.”

Tiwahna Whyte, Vanessa Ledezma and Hayden Poulain of the Boys and Girls Club of Palm Springs won third place in 2015 in the 14-18 category. Their film, “Finding My Strength,” is a powerful personal statement by Tiwahna, who was bullied; she shares the way she handled her reactions. She first talks of confronting a bully and opening a dialogue that led to them becoming friends.

“All I did was stand up for myself. It was the first time I felt powerful. I said, ‘This is how I feel, and you can’t do anything about it, because I’m still going to do what I’m put on earth to do,’” she says in the film. Later, when she was again subject to bullying, she developed coping skills that included writing and sharing her feelings. Her film is a compelling testament to the difference it can make for youngsters to learn from others facing similar situations.

I urge you to go to the film festival website or scroll down to the end of this article to watch the amazing award-winning films submitted by young people from all around the world. The messages include one young man’s response to bullying: “Turn around and look at yourself.” A young girl walked around the streets of New York asking, “If you could change the world in one sentence, what would it be and why?” and submitted responses that vary from eating healthy to making peace. Another boy’s film, depicting physical confrontations, concludes, “You always have a choice, and it can change your own and everyone else’s lives.”

Carole Krechman has created and nurtured a wonderful organization dedicated to educating young people about their ability to influence each other to make a better world.

“I want kids to know they can walk anywhere in the world and know they’re not going to die, that violence won’t end their life,” she said.  

What have you done lately to make a difference? Supporting the Peacemaker Corps might be a good way to start.

Anita Rufus is also known as “The Lovable Liberal,” and her radio show airs Sundays from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on KNews Radio 94.3 FM. Email her at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Know Your Neighbors appears every other Wednesday.

Published in Know Your Neighbors

It was a big day for 30 children with the Boys and Girls Club of Palm Springs.

On Friday, July 31, the children received their very own bikes, all of which were gathered during a bike drive that was spearheaded by the City of Palm Springs Office of Sustainability. The children also received a bike lock, a helmet and a safety lesson.

The giveaway came on the heels of a similar donation of more than 60 bikes to children with the Boys and Girls Club of Mecca.

"There is a great need in the Coachella Valley for children's bicycles," said Brett Klein, chair of the Palm Springs Sustainability Commission. "Many families can't afford to provide new bikes to each of their children. We are very proud on how successful this has been over the last couple years. There is no better joy than to see the smile on a child's face when they receive their bike."

In addition to the Office of Sustainability, the bike drive was supported by the Coachella Valley Bicycle Coalition, Hot Purple Energy, Palm Springs/Palm Desert Cyclery, Sun Tran, Incight.org and Hocker Productions. The drive was greatly boosted by a $3,000 donation from Trek Bicycles. The Independent was also a supporter of the drive.

Scroll down to view a gallery from the presentation of bikes to the kids with the Boys and Girls Club of Palm Springs.

Published in Snapshot

A bike can mean a lot to a kid.

“It comes down to wellness,” said Brett Klein, chair of the Palm Springs Sustainability Coalition. “It also comes down to the ability to get from point A to point B.”

He used a not-so-hypothetical child who lives in the East Valley as an example.

“A kid may need to get to the Boys and Girls Club—and may need to travel three to five miles to get there, at a time when the parents are working,” he said.

This is why the City of Palm Springs Office of Sustainability, in conjunction with the Coachella Valley Bicycle Coalition and Sun Tran, is in the midst of a bicycle drive. The goal: To get more than 100 working, functioning bicycles to kids in need via both the Boys and Girls Club of Palm Springs, and the Boys and Girls Club of Coachella Valley, in Mecca.

The drive runs through Saturday, June 20. As of this writing (on Thursday, June 11), Klein said the drive, which kicked off in earnest on June 1, had garnered about half of its goal, boosted in part by a $3,000 donation by Trek Bicycles. He also said a local hotel/resort donated a bunch of old cruisers it had replaced with new bicycles.

Klein said used bicycles are more than welcome—so if you have a bike or two gathering dust in a garage, for example, bring it on down. New bicycles for children of any age are also appreciated, as are donations via cash or check (made out to “City of Palm Springs—Bike Drive”). All donations are tax-deductible, by the way.

The drop-off/donation locations:

• Hot Purple Energy, 810 N. Farrell Drive, Palm Springs

• Palm Springs Cyclery, 611 S. Palm Canyon Drive, Palm Springs 

• Palm Desert Cyclery, 77750 Country Club Drive, Palm Desert 

• SunLine Transit Agency, 32505 Harry Oliver Trail, Thousand Palms

The kids in need will not only receive the bicycles donated during the drive; they will also all receive a bike lock and a helmet, in addition to a safety lesson.

For more information, visit healthyplanethealthyyoups.com.

Full disclosure: The Coachella Valley Independent is a partner in the bicycle drive. In other words, we’re donating time and space to help spread the word.

Published in Local Issues

Duroville is synonymous with abject poverty, disgusting messes, noxious fumes, electrical fires, feral dogs and sewage ponds. In the backyard of the glitzy Coachella Valley, our fellow humans were allowed to live in conditions like those in the slums of what we call Third World countries.

The park was due to be shut down in 2003 for health and safety violations. And in 2007. And again in 2009. On tribal land near Thermal, Duroville belongs to a man named Harvey Duro Sr., a member of the Torres Martinez Desert Cahuilla Indians.

At one time, almost 4,000 people lived there. The majority of residents are migrant farm workers, picking vegetables and fruit in the nearby agricultural fields. Most of them moved into a new government-subsidized housing development called Mountain View Estates, just a few miles away, at various stages during 2012. There, they can turn on the tap and see clear water, rather than the brown liquid that would leak out in Duroville.

They have air conditioning. The toilets don’t back up. Wires aren’t hanging out in the open, and raw sewage isn’t forming puddles on the streets.

Yet there are still families living at Duroville, hoping to be re-housed. They may be moved by May 2013.

After the majority of families had left, so, too, did the regular services that residents had been paying for. For weeks, the trash was not picked up.

That is where Rudy Gutierrez, a South Coast Air Quality Management District liaison officer for the east Coachella Valley, came in. Together with the Economic Development Agency (EDA), the office of Riverside County Supervisor John Benoit, and Burrtec, he organized a community cleanup on Saturday, March 30, to help the remaining residents by hauling off any bulk items they wished to get rid of.

Cleaning up Duroville is a massive undertaking, and this was a great start. There will be more cleanups in the future.

Approximately 120 volunteers came, mostly youth, from all over Coachella Valley. There was a girls' softball team, Kaos from La Quinta, composed of mostly sixth-graders. The boys’ boxing and basketball team from Mecca, the Boys and Girls Club and a variety of high school teams from all over the valley were also there. Some of the school teams were receiving a stipend for their volunteering, to benefit their teams.

I joined the teams and the respective adults, and together, we went around Duroville. We asked residents whether they would like to have any items removed. Burrtec’s large dump trucks would follow us around, and we would gather and place items in the bin. In some cases, the families were there to direct us to what they wanted us to take. In other cases, they had already placed items in their yards. Dust and dirt whirled all around as we picked up items ranging from fridges to tables, chairs to broken toys, broken bicycles to pieces of metal. The kids were motivated to help, but we were all very safety-conscious. The relief was evident on the residents’ faces, the thank-yous loud and clear.

The coach of the girls’ softball team said something very poignant when we spoke about participating in the cleanup. He brought the girls out here to do something as a team, outside of softball, and to let them see how others live. He wanted the young athletes to learn to be appreciative of what one has.

Indeed, it is sobering. No one should have to live like that. No one.

The end of Duroville is nigh. The remaining families are anxious to know when they will be moved, and where they will end up. Most of the residents will end up in homes currently being finished in the Mountain View Estates. Others are unsure what the future will bring. Not all residents will qualify to live in Mountain View and thus are looking for alternatives.

After helping with the cleanup, I can’t imagine anywhere that would not be a step up from Duroville.

Published in Local Issues