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04 Apr 2018

Know Your Neighbors: Meet Bryanna Czarny, Someone Who Has Found the Answer to Life's Big Question at a Young Age

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Bryanna Czarny: "I’ve learned to tell myself: ‘You are beautiful and special. Don’t ever let anyone take away your dreams. You’re capable of achieving what you want through hard work and dedication, and when you get a ‘yes,’ it’s worth every ‘no’ you’ve ever received.’" Bryanna Czarny: "I’ve learned to tell myself: ‘You are beautiful and special. Don’t ever let anyone take away your dreams. You’re capable of achieving what you want through hard work and dedication, and when you get a ‘yes,’ it’s worth every ‘no’ you’ve ever received.’"

At what age do we finally figure out what our life is all about? Some of us never figure it out—while others are seemingly lucky enough to figure it out quite young.

Bryanna Czarny, 24, was born in Bellflower, Calif., as the oldest of five children. She spent her early years in Yucca Valley, and has been in La Quinta since the seventh-grade. She came out of a hard-working family: Her father has been a UPS employee for many years, while her mother has proven it’s never too late to go back to school for a career.

Czarny had done some acting in high school, including being nominated for a supporting-actress award. “I had acting coaches who believed in me and pushed me,” she says.

After graduating from La Quinta High School, Bryanna was dead-set on moving to Los Angeles to pursue her education toward a career in television and film production. “My mom kept saying I should go to San Diego, to study toward becoming a newscaster or doing public relations,” says Czarny. “But acting was my dream. Singing was my dream. I wanted to be in entertainment. They finally stopped pestering me.

“My story took twists and turns like I couldn’t have imagined. In the Coachella Valley, I was protected, but didn’t feel like I was expected to do a lot. In L.A., I got in with the wrong crowd and got into drinking and drugs for the first time in my life. I was abused. I was homeless. I even had a gun pulled on me once. I felt overwhelmed, like there was no way to find any help—no tutors or faculty support like I had in high school. No one really knew what was going on.

“I was told that my grades were slipping, and I was going to get kicked out of school. The hardest thing I ever had to do was tell my parents. I was lucky enough to finally talk with a counselor who told me, ‘It’s not over,’ and to pick my head up, go home and start fresh.

“Then an amazing thing happened. It was Christmastime, my first day home, with my car still all packed up. I got a text through a friend on Facebook, from a guy I didn’t even know—who is now my boyfriend. I feel as if God gave us each other. We were both going through things, and we were magically put together at what was then the lowest point in our lives.”

Czarny enrolled at College of the Desert. “Little did I know COD was my best option,” she says. “My life changed dramatically. I’ve been maintaining a high GPA, became captain of the soccer team, wrote for the Chaparral newspaper and was featured in The Desert Sun. I’ve had lead roles in COD productions, created the first annual COD talent show, and took part in student government.

“I was even lucky enough to meet Mary Jane Sanchez-Fulton,” a member of the COD board of trustees and a local political activist, “who took me under her wing. I helped her run a march at the state Legislature supporting education. I also got seriously involved again in acting and was lucky enough to get the lead role in Sylvia, for which I was thrilled to win a Desert Theatre League award up against so many experienced people.

“I think I had to go through the struggles to be as strong as I feel right now.”

Czarny is close to her parents, although she doesn’t think they fully understand what she went through.

“I know I messed up, but I’m a whole new person now. My eyes are open,” she says. “I know my family just wants me to be happy and successful, and I’ll do whatever I must to make them proud of me. If I had lots of money, I’d want to (help) my dad retire so my parents wouldn’t have to work so hard. I don’t always say how much I appreciate them.

“I’m not ashamed of what I went through, because I feel as if I can be a messenger for others. Although I still love film and singing and acting, I now know that teaching is the right path for me.”

Czarny, however, has not abandoned her dream of acting and singing. “I’ve been acting since I was a little kid. I even got to do the school announcements over the intercom in elementary school!

“I still hope to get on American Idol or The Voice,” she laughs.

The best advice Czarny has received: “My best friend always tells me, ‘If ever you’re down or in need, keep a fighting spirit, and keep a smile on your face.’ I’ve learned to tell myself: ‘You are beautiful and special. Don’t ever let anyone take away your dreams. You’re capable of achieving what you want through hard work and dedication, and when you get a ‘yes,’ it’s worth every ‘no’ you’ve ever received.’ Whatever happens, never give up.”

I wish I had learned that lesson by the time I was 24. Don’t you?

Anita Rufus is also known as “The Lovable Liberal,” and her radio show airs Sundays at noon on KNews Radio 94.3 FM. Email her at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Know Your Neighbors appears every other Wednesday.

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